Getting over the mighty log (jumping that is)

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Alan McClure, Jun 26, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Alan McClure

    Alan McClure Guest

    So, when most of you come across a log on the trail--let's say it is 8-12 inches tall.

    Do You:

    1) get off and carry your bike over
    2) hop over it
    3)bunny hop over it
    4)Other

    You see, out of all the obstacles I come across, this is the only one that consistently stumps me. I
    can get over them most of the time(especially when they are smaller--heheheh), but it never feels
    smooth(rear wheel bumps), sometimes I hit my chainring, and 1/3 of the time I fall or get stuck. I
    am so frustrated because I can't seem to figure out how to get over them easily after many, many
    times trying. Soooo, what do you all do when you see a log up ahead? And, what do you recommend me
    trying. I'll practice anything if it'll help.

    Thanks,

    Alan McClure
     
    Tags:


  2. Jason

    Jason Guest

    > 1) get off and carry your bike over

    Still need to develop the skillz. 8-12" is a bit much for me, maybe in a year or so Ill have
    the talent.
     
  3. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "Alan McClure" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > So, when most of you come across a log on the trail--let's say it is 8-12 inches tall.
    >
    > Do You:
    >
    > 1) get off and carry your bike over
    > 2) hop over it
    > 3)bunny hop over it
    > 4)Other
    >
    >
    > You see, out of all the obstacles I come across, this is the only one that consistently stumps me.
    > I can get over them most of the time(especially when they are smaller--heheheh), but it never
    > feels smooth(rear wheel bumps), sometimes I hit my chainring, and 1/3 of the time I fall or get
    > stuck. I am so frustrated because I can't seem to figure out how to get over them easily after
    > many, many times trying. Soooo, what do you all do when you see a log up ahead? And, what do you
    > recommend me trying. I'll practice anything if it'll help.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Alan McClure

    Hop it. If its under 6", and i've got speed, I'll just jump the sucker. I don't have a great bunny
    hop, its more of a lift both wheels at once clipless cheating thing, so anything bigger than that
    and I do my second technique, which is basically a slow motion bunnyhop (I've done it on logs up to
    approx 26"/wheelsize) -

    Approach log fairly slowly, but not superslow. Figure middle front, one of the three largest rear.
    Rock backwards on the bike, pulling the bar with you, and get the front wheel on the very top of the
    log. Try to stay forward on the bike, over the bars, when you get to the log - if you're too far
    back, then you'll simply run right into the log with the rear wheel and fall. Ok, here's the
    important step - and its pretty hard to do without clipless. What you want to do is pull up the rear
    wheel and put it on top of the log. At the same time, you want to throw the front of the bike
    forwards and down. This is a VERY explosive move, you actually get both tires off the ground for a
    bit. If you really do it well, and have enough speed, you can actually clear the whole log this way.
    Usually, especially on bigger logs, you'll simply end up with the front wheel down on the ground,
    and the rear wheel on top. If you had the speed perfect, and do it right, then the wheel will come
    right off, and not even hit the top hard. If not, you can give a very small pedal stroke and just
    watch your balance.

    Here's pretty much what I'm talking about, although Charlie doesn't quite get the rear wheel all the
    way on top. Give 'im some slack tho, he is in his mid 60s (and can still outpace me anyday, the
    guy's an animal!) http://pages.prodigy.com/CharlieB/log.htm

    Hope that helps.

    Jon Bond
     
  4. Alan McClure

    Alan McClure Guest

    "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Alan McClure" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > So, when most of you come across a log on the trail--let's say it is
    8-12
    > > inches tall.
    > >
    > > Do You:
    > >
    > > 1) get off and carry your bike over
    > > 2) hop over it
    > > 3)bunny hop over it
    > > 4)Other
    > >
    > >
    > > You see, out of all the obstacles I come across, this is the only one
    that
    > > consistently stumps me. I can get over them most of the time(especially when they are
    > > smaller--heheheh), but it never feels smooth(rear wheel bumps), sometimes I hit my chainring,
    > > and 1/3 of the time I fall or get stuck. I am so frustrated because I can't seem to figure out
    > > how to get over them easily after many, many times trying. Soooo, what do you all
    do
    > > when you see a log up ahead? And, what do you recommend me trying.
    I'll
    > > practice anything if it'll help.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Alan McClure
    >
    > Hop it. If its under 6", and i've got speed, I'll just jump the sucker.
    I
    > don't have a great bunny hop, its more of a lift both wheels at once clipless cheating thing, so
    > anything bigger than that and I do my second technique, which is basically a slow motion bunnyhop
    > (I've done it on logs up to approx 26"/wheelsize) -
    >
    > Approach log fairly slowly, but not superslow. Figure middle front, one
    of
    > the three largest rear. Rock backwards on the bike, pulling the bar with you, and get the front
    > wheel on the very top of the log. Try to stay forward on the bike, over the bars, when you get to
    > the log - if you're
    too
    > far back, then you'll simply run right into the log with the rear wheel
    and
    > fall. Ok, here's the important step - and its pretty hard to do without clipless. What you want to
    > do is pull up the rear wheel and put it on top of the log. At the same time, you want to throw the
    > front of the bike forwards and down. This is a VERY explosive move, you actually get both tires
    > off the ground for a bit. If you really do it well, and have enough speed, you can actually clear
    > the whole log this way. Usually, especially on bigger logs, you'll simply end up with the front
    > wheel down on the ground, and the rear wheel on top. If you had the speed perfect, and do
    it
    > right, then the wheel will come right off, and not even hit the top hard. If not, you can give a
    > very small pedal stroke and just watch your
    balance.
    >
    > Here's pretty much what I'm talking about, although Charlie doesn't quite get the rear wheel all
    > the way on top. Give 'im some slack tho, he is in his mid 60s (and can still outpace me anyday,
    > the guy's an animal!) http://pages.prodigy.com/CharlieB/log.htm
    >
    > Hope that helps.
    >
    > Jon Bond
    >
    >

    Okay, between photos 3 and 4, is he surging forward using a pedal stroke that just hasn't been
    photographed, or is he just shifting his weight forward (like in a bunny hop) explosively and
    letting the momentum carry him up and over. I must say, that he makes it look super easy, and yet, I
    can't imagine doing it myself. That is incredible.

    Alan
     
  5. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On Fri, 27 Jun 2003 00:01:13 GMT, "Alan McClure" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >So, when most of you come across a log on the trail--let's say it is 8-12 inches tall.
    >
    >Do You:
    >
    >1) get off and carry your bike over
    >2) hop over it
    >3)bunny hop over it
    >4)Other
    >
    >
    >You see, out of all the obstacles I come across, this is the only one that consistently stumps me.
    >I can get over them most of the time(especially when they are smaller--heheheh), but it never feels
    >smooth(rear wheel bumps), sometimes I hit my chainring, and 1/3 of the time I fall or get stuck. I
    >am so frustrated because I can't seem to figure out how to get over them easily after many, many
    >times trying. Soooo, what do you all do when you see a log up ahead? And, what do you recommend me
    >trying. I'll practice anything if it'll help.
    >
    >Thanks,
    >
    >Alan McClure

    Do as I do not as I say.

    1. Sometimes hitting the chain ring is unavoidable, sometimes desirable. I have a rock guard that I
    use to balance on sometimes.

    2. If possible use moderate speed. From your description it's impossible to tell the complete
    situation. The following assumes you have ample time and space to use moderate speed.

    3. As you approach pre-load and pop the front up onto the log. Timing and practice are critical.

    4. When the front is on top of the log, push your bike (not your body) forward and down while
    lifting your rear wheel off the ground. At this point your body position should be similar to
    what follows. Arms extended, butt off the back of your seat and over the rear tire, feet 3 and 9
    o-clock on the pedals. Your rear wheel will most likely contact the log, don't let that spook
    you. Again, timing and practice are critical.

    5. Done right the front should contact the ground first, use your arms as shock absorbers, whether
    or not if have front suspension. As the rear wheel hits pull yourself back onto the bike in your
    normal riding position.

    6. Practice this technique on small logs and gradually build up to bigger ones. It may feel weird
    but it's tried and true.

    Now I may have left something out so remember "Do as I do not as I say"

    Peace, Bill(works for me)Wheeler. The mind serves properly as a window glass rather than as a
    reflector, that is, the mind should give an immediate view instead of an interpretation of
    the world.
    :-]
     
  6. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "Alan McClure" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:D[email protected]...
    >
    > "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Alan McClure" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > So, when most of you come across a log on the trail--let's say it is
    > 8-12
    > > > inches tall.
    > > >
    > > > Do You:
    > > >
    > > > 1) get off and carry your bike over
    > > > 2) hop over it
    > > > 3)bunny hop over it
    > > > 4)Other
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > You see, out of all the obstacles I come across, this is the only one
    > that
    > > > consistently stumps me. I can get over them most of the
    time(especially
    > > > when they are smaller--heheheh), but it never feels smooth(rear wheel bumps), sometimes I hit
    > > > my chainring, and 1/3 of the time I fall or
    get
    > > > stuck. I am so frustrated because I can't seem to figure out how to
    get
    > > > over them easily after many, many times trying. Soooo, what do you
    all
    > do
    > > > when you see a log up ahead? And, what do you recommend me trying.
    > I'll
    > > > practice anything if it'll help.
    > > >
    > > > Thanks,
    > > >
    > > > Alan McClure
    > >
    > > Hop it. If its under 6", and i've got speed, I'll just jump the sucker.
    > I
    > > don't have a great bunny hop, its more of a lift both wheels at once clipless cheating thing, so
    > > anything bigger than that and I do my second technique, which is basically a slow motion
    > > bunnyhop (I've done it on
    logs
    > > up to approx 26"/wheelsize) -
    > >
    > > Approach log fairly slowly, but not superslow. Figure middle front, one
    > of
    > > the three largest rear. Rock backwards on the bike, pulling the bar
    with
    > > you, and get the front wheel on the very top of the log. Try to stay forward on the bike, over
    > > the bars, when you get to the log - if you're
    > too
    > > far back, then you'll simply run right into the log with the rear wheel
    > and
    > > fall. Ok, here's the important step - and its pretty hard to do without clipless. What you want
    > > to do is pull up the rear wheel and put it on
    top
    > > of the log. At the same time, you want to throw the front of the bike forwards and down. This is
    > > a VERY explosive move, you actually get both tires off the ground for a bit. If you really do it
    > > well, and have
    enough
    > > speed, you can actually clear the whole log this way. Usually,
    especially
    > > on bigger logs, you'll simply end up with the front wheel down on the ground, and the rear wheel
    > > on top. If you had the speed perfect, and do
    > it
    > > right, then the wheel will come right off, and not even hit the top
    hard.
    > > If not, you can give a very small pedal stroke and just watch your
    > balance.
    > >
    > > Here's pretty much what I'm talking about, although Charlie doesn't
    quite
    > > get the rear wheel all the way on top. Give 'im some slack tho, he is
    in
    > > his mid 60s (and can still outpace me anyday, the guy's an animal!)
    > > http://pages.prodigy.com/CharlieB/log.htm
    > >
    > > Hope that helps.
    > >
    > > Jon Bond
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Okay, between photos 3 and 4, is he surging forward using a pedal stroke that just hasn't been
    > photographed, or is he just shifting his weight forward (like in a bunny hop) explosively and
    > letting the momentum carry
    him
    > up and over. I must say, that he makes it look super easy, and yet, I
    can't
    > imagine doing it myself. That is incredible.
    >
    > Alan

    Its mostly just pulling up with the feet and pushing forwards and down with the bars. I can't bunny
    hop for shite, like I said, but I have no problems getting over logs, and have taught 3 of my
    friends to do it (2 with clipless, one with toe clips). Its easier if you see it done, so bug your
    experienced mountain biking friends!

    Jon Bond
     
  7. Jason

    Jason Guest

    "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Alan McClure" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:D[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > "Alan McClure" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > > So, when most of you come across a log on the trail--let's say it is
    > > 8-12
    > > > > inches tall.
    > > > >
    > > > > Do You:
    > > > >
    > > > > 1) get off and carry your bike over
    > > > > 2) hop over it
    > > > > 3)bunny hop over it
    > > > > 4)Other
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > You see, out of all the obstacles I come across, this is the only
    one
    > > that
    > > > > consistently stumps me. I can get over them most of the
    > time(especially
    > > > > when they are smaller--heheheh), but it never feels smooth(rear
    wheel
    > > > > bumps), sometimes I hit my chainring, and 1/3 of the time I fall or
    > get
    > > > > stuck. I am so frustrated because I can't seem to figure out how to
    > get
    > > > > over them easily after many, many times trying. Soooo, what do you
    > all
    > > do
    > > > > when you see a log up ahead? And, what do you recommend me trying.
    > > I'll
    > > > > practice anything if it'll help.
    > > > >
    > > > > Thanks,
    > > > >
    > > > > Alan McClure
    > > >
    > > > Hop it. If its under 6", and i've got speed, I'll just jump the
    sucker.
    > > I
    > > > don't have a great bunny hop, its more of a lift both wheels at once clipless cheating thing,
    > > > so anything bigger than that and I do my
    second
    > > > technique, which is basically a slow motion bunnyhop (I've done it on
    > logs
    > > > up to approx 26"/wheelsize) -
    > > >
    > > > Approach log fairly slowly, but not superslow. Figure middle front,
    one
    > > of
    > > > the three largest rear. Rock backwards on the bike, pulling the bar
    > with
    > > > you, and get the front wheel on the very top of the log. Try to stay forward on the bike, over
    > > > the bars, when you get to the log - if
    you're
    > > too
    > > > far back, then you'll simply run right into the log with the rear
    wheel
    > > and
    > > > fall. Ok, here's the important step - and its pretty hard to do
    without
    > > > clipless. What you want to do is pull up the rear wheel and put it on
    > top
    > > > of the log. At the same time, you want to throw the front of the bike forwards and down. This
    > > > is a VERY explosive move, you actually get
    both
    > > > tires off the ground for a bit. If you really do it well, and have
    > enough
    > > > speed, you can actually clear the whole log this way. Usually,
    > especially
    > > > on bigger logs, you'll simply end up with the front wheel down on the ground, and the rear
    > > > wheel on top. If you had the speed perfect, and
    do
    > > it
    > > > right, then the wheel will come right off, and not even hit the top
    > hard.
    > > > If not, you can give a very small pedal stroke and just watch your
    > > balance.
    > > >
    > > > Here's pretty much what I'm talking about, although Charlie doesn't
    > quite
    > > > get the rear wheel all the way on top. Give 'im some slack tho, he is
    > in
    > > > his mid 60s (and can still outpace me anyday, the guy's an animal!)
    > > > http://pages.prodigy.com/CharlieB/log.htm
    > > >
    > > > Hope that helps.
    > > >
    > > > Jon Bond
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > > Okay, between photos 3 and 4, is he surging forward using a pedal stroke that just hasn't been
    > > photographed, or is he just shifting his weight forward (like in a bunny hop) explosively and
    > > letting the momentum carry
    > him
    > > up and over. I must say, that he makes it look super easy, and yet, I
    > can't
    > > imagine doing it myself. That is incredible.
    > >
    > > Alan
    >
    > Its mostly just pulling up with the feet and pushing forwards and down
    with
    > the bars. I can't bunny hop for shite, like I said, but I have no
    problems
    > getting over logs, and have taught 3 of my friends to do it (2 with clipless, one with toe clips).
    > Its easier if you see it done, so bug your experienced mountain biking friends!
    >
    > Jon Bond
    >
    >

    I think my problem with this stunt is I cant get my arse over my seat! I dunno if its my seat
    (Specialized BG Milano) or my post it too high, or my short legs, probably the combination of all
    three. If I could get my butt back there I would probably try this. Looks like fun!
     
  8. Jon Bond

    Jon Bond Guest

    "Jason" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Alan McClure" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:D[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > >
    > > > > "Alan McClure" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > > So, when most of you come across a log on the trail--let's say it
    is
    > > > 8-12
    > > > > > inches tall.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Do You:
    > > > > >
    > > > > > 1) get off and carry your bike over
    > > > > > 2) hop over it
    > > > > > 3)bunny hop over it
    > > > > > 4)Other
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > > > You see, out of all the obstacles I come across, this is the only
    > one
    > > > that
    > > > > > consistently stumps me. I can get over them most of the
    > > time(especially
    > > > > > when they are smaller--heheheh), but it never feels smooth(rear
    > wheel
    > > > > > bumps), sometimes I hit my chainring, and 1/3 of the time I fall
    or
    > > get
    > > > > > stuck. I am so frustrated because I can't seem to figure out how
    to
    > > get
    > > > > > over them easily after many, many times trying. Soooo, what do
    you
    > > all
    > > > do
    > > > > > when you see a log up ahead? And, what do you recommend me
    trying.
    > > > I'll
    > > > > > practice anything if it'll help.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Thanks,
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Alan McClure
    > > > >
    > > > > Hop it. If its under 6", and i've got speed, I'll just jump the
    > sucker.
    > > > I
    > > > > don't have a great bunny hop, its more of a lift both wheels at once clipless cheating
    > > > > thing, so anything bigger than that and I do my
    > second
    > > > > technique, which is basically a slow motion bunnyhop (I've done it
    on
    > > logs
    > > > > up to approx 26"/wheelsize) -
    > > > >
    > > > > Approach log fairly slowly, but not superslow. Figure middle front,
    > one
    > > > of
    > > > > the three largest rear. Rock backwards on the bike, pulling the bar
    > > with
    > > > > you, and get the front wheel on the very top of the log. Try to
    stay
    > > > > forward on the bike, over the bars, when you get to the log - if
    > you're
    > > > too
    > > > > far back, then you'll simply run right into the log with the rear
    > wheel
    > > > and
    > > > > fall. Ok, here's the important step - and its pretty hard to do
    > without
    > > > > clipless. What you want to do is pull up the rear wheel and put it
    on
    > > top
    > > > > of the log. At the same time, you want to throw the front of the
    bike
    > > > > forwards and down. This is a VERY explosive move, you actually get
    > both
    > > > > tires off the ground for a bit. If you really do it well, and have
    > > enough
    > > > > speed, you can actually clear the whole log this way. Usually,
    > > especially
    > > > > on bigger logs, you'll simply end up with the front wheel down on
    the
    > > > > ground, and the rear wheel on top. If you had the speed perfect,
    and
    > do
    > > > it
    > > > > right, then the wheel will come right off, and not even hit the top
    > > hard.
    > > > > If not, you can give a very small pedal stroke and just watch your
    > > > balance.
    > > > >
    > > > > Here's pretty much what I'm talking about, although Charlie doesn't
    > > quite
    > > > > get the rear wheel all the way on top. Give 'im some slack tho, he
    is
    > > in
    > > > > his mid 60s (and can still outpace me anyday, the guy's an animal!)
    > > > > http://pages.prodigy.com/CharlieB/log.htm
    > > > >
    > > > > Hope that helps.
    > > > >
    > > > > Jon Bond
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > Okay, between photos 3 and 4, is he surging forward using a pedal
    stroke
    > > > that just hasn't been photographed, or is he just shifting his weight forward (like in a bunny
    > > > hop) explosively and letting the momentum
    carry
    > > him
    > > > up and over. I must say, that he makes it look super easy, and yet, I
    > > can't
    > > > imagine doing it myself. That is incredible.
    > > >
    > > > Alan
    > >
    > > Its mostly just pulling up with the feet and pushing forwards and down
    > with
    > > the bars. I can't bunny hop for shite, like I said, but I have no
    > problems
    > > getting over logs, and have taught 3 of my friends to do it (2 with clipless, one with toe
    > > clips). Its easier if you see it done, so bug
    your
    > > experienced mountain biking friends!
    > >
    > > Jon Bond
    > >
    > >
    >
    > I think my problem with this stunt is I cant get my arse over my seat! I dunno if its my seat
    > (Specialized BG Milano) or my post it too high, or my short legs, probably the combination of all
    > three. If I could get my butt back there I would probably try this. Looks like fun!

    Try starting with your seat all the way down. If your seat is too wide for you to get behind,
    period, then a narrower saddle would really help - not only in log jumping, but also steeps (I know
    I get behind my saddle on a lot of trail stuff).

    Oh yeah, and for everybody - watch the boyz, the seat can get kinda close if you screw up ;)

    Jon Bond
     
  9. Jason

    Jason Guest

    "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Jason" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > "Alan McClure" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:D[email protected]...
    > > > >
    > > > > "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > >
    > > > > > "Alan McClure" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > > > So, when most of you come across a log on the trail--let's say
    it
    > is
    > > > > 8-12
    > > > > > > inches tall.
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > Do You:
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > 1) get off and carry your bike over
    > > > > > > 2) hop over it
    > > > > > > 3)bunny hop over it
    > > > > > > 4)Other
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > You see, out of all the obstacles I come across, this is the
    only
    > > one
    > > > > that
    > > > > > > consistently stumps me. I can get over them most of the
    > > > time(especially
    > > > > > > when they are smaller--heheheh), but it never feels smooth(rear
    > > wheel
    > > > > > > bumps), sometimes I hit my chainring, and 1/3 of the time I fall
    > or
    > > > get
    > > > > > > stuck. I am so frustrated because I can't seem to figure out
    how
    > to
    > > > get
    > > > > > > over them easily after many, many times trying. Soooo, what do
    > you
    > > > all
    > > > > do
    > > > > > > when you see a log up ahead? And, what do you recommend me
    > trying.
    > > > > I'll
    > > > > > > practice anything if it'll help.
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > Thanks,
    > > > > > >
    > > > > > > Alan McClure
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Hop it. If its under 6", and i've got speed, I'll just jump the
    > > sucker.
    > > > > I
    > > > > > don't have a great bunny hop, its more of a lift both wheels at
    once
    > > > > > clipless cheating thing, so anything bigger than that and I do my
    > > second
    > > > > > technique, which is basically a slow motion bunnyhop (I've done it
    > on
    > > > logs
    > > > > > up to approx 26"/wheelsize) -
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Approach log fairly slowly, but not superslow. Figure middle
    front,
    > > one
    > > > > of
    > > > > > the three largest rear. Rock backwards on the bike, pulling the
    bar
    > > > with
    > > > > > you, and get the front wheel on the very top of the log. Try to
    > stay
    > > > > > forward on the bike, over the bars, when you get to the log - if
    > > you're
    > > > > too
    > > > > > far back, then you'll simply run right into the log with the rear
    > > wheel
    > > > > and
    > > > > > fall. Ok, here's the important step - and its pretty hard to do
    > > without
    > > > > > clipless. What you want to do is pull up the rear wheel and put
    it
    > on
    > > > top
    > > > > > of the log. At the same time, you want to throw the front of the
    > bike
    > > > > > forwards and down. This is a VERY explosive move, you actually
    get
    > > both
    > > > > > tires off the ground for a bit. If you really do it well, and
    have
    > > > enough
    > > > > > speed, you can actually clear the whole log this way. Usually,
    > > > especially
    > > > > > on bigger logs, you'll simply end up with the front wheel down on
    > the
    > > > > > ground, and the rear wheel on top. If you had the speed perfect,
    > and
    > > do
    > > > > it
    > > > > > right, then the wheel will come right off, and not even hit the
    top
    > > > hard.
    > > > > > If not, you can give a very small pedal stroke and just watch your
    > > > > balance.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Here's pretty much what I'm talking about, although Charlie
    doesn't
    > > > quite
    > > > > > get the rear wheel all the way on top. Give 'im some slack tho,
    he
    > is
    > > > in
    > > > > > his mid 60s (and can still outpace me anyday, the guy's an
    animal!)
    > > > > > http://pages.prodigy.com/CharlieB/log.htm
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Hope that helps.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Jon Bond
    > > > > >
    > > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > Okay, between photos 3 and 4, is he surging forward using a pedal
    > stroke
    > > > > that just hasn't been photographed, or is he just shifting his
    weight
    > > > > forward (like in a bunny hop) explosively and letting the momentum
    > carry
    > > > him
    > > > > up and over. I must say, that he makes it look super easy, and yet,
    I
    > > > can't
    > > > > imagine doing it myself. That is incredible.
    > > > >
    > > > > Alan
    > > >
    > > > Its mostly just pulling up with the feet and pushing forwards and down
    > > with
    > > > the bars. I can't bunny hop for shite, like I said, but I have no
    > > problems
    > > > getting over logs, and have taught 3 of my friends to do it (2 with clipless, one with toe
    > > > clips). Its easier if you see it done, so bug
    > your
    > > > experienced mountain biking friends!
    > > >
    > > > Jon Bond
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > > I think my problem with this stunt is I cant get my arse over my seat!
    I
    > > dunno if its my seat (Specialized BG Milano) or my post it too high, or
    my
    > > short legs, probably the combination of all three. If I could get my
    butt
    > > back there I would probably try this. Looks like fun!
    >
    > Try starting with your seat all the way down. If your seat is too wide
    for
    > you to get behind, period, then a narrower saddle would really help - not only in log jumping, but
    > also steeps (I know I get behind my saddle on a
    lot
    > of trail stuff).
    >
    > Oh yeah, and for everybody - watch the boyz, the seat can get kinda close
    if
    > you screw up ;)
    >
    > Jon Bond
    >
    >

    OOF I hear ya there. I think I need to cut my post down maybe two inches. At its LOWEST (I have an
    FSR so it does have a lowest point) my knee only bends very slightly while the pedal is extended. I
    find on the road, raising the seat helps, but off road, lowering it helps as well. I have plenty of
    post in the tube so I can stand to lose 2 inches, and I think that even 1 inch *might* let me get my
    butt back. Still, I got this seat when I was still acclimating to riding and wanted to cushion my
    butt. Its more of a touring seat, I am considering asking for a Sella Italia Flite Ti Gel (one with
    the taint hole) for my birthday in a few months. Any other seat recommendations?
     
  10. > Try starting with your seat all the way down. If your seat is too wide
    for
    > you to get behind, period, then a narrower saddle would really help - not

    This is absolutely critical. I endoed all the time because I couldn't get my thighs around my old
    BMX saddle. In fact, I would endo randomly when I wasn't pedaling and standing completely still on
    the ground. I would stop at a stoplight on the way to the trail, and suddenly, I would just flip
    over forwards because my saddle was too wide.

    Traffic was usually amused.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  11. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Alan McClure wrote:
    > So, when most of you come across a log on the trail--let's say it is 8-12 inches tall.
    >
    > Do You:
    >
    > 1) get off and carry your bike over
    > 2) hop over it
    > 3)bunny hop over it
    > 4)Other

    Depends on the conditions. If you're on the ~flat with a nice run-in and run-out, anything under 12"
    you should just bunny hop. Bends, uphills, ruts, etc, all make hitting a log at a decent speed
    difficult, in which case, it's the up-and-over described by Jon.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  12. Trentus

    Trentus Guest

    "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    <snip>

    > Here's pretty much what I'm talking about
    <snip>
    > http://pages.prodigy.com/CharlieB/log.htm

    My problem with this trick, is the fact that while learning it I'm almost certainly going to come a
    gutser at least a couple of dozen times, and I just aint that keen on falling onto a hard log, or
    off one even for that matter (strange I know)

    I get the concept, I just aint got the guts to go try it out.

    Trentus
     
  13. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Alan McClure" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > So, when most of you come across a log on the trail--let's say it is
    8-12
    > > inches tall.
    > >
    > > Do You:
    > >
    > > 1) get off and carry your bike over
    > > 2) hop over it
    > > 3)bunny hop over it
    > > 4)Other
    > >
    > >
    > > You see, out of all the obstacles I come across, this is the only one
    that
    > > consistently stumps me. I can get over them most of the time(especially when they are
    > > smaller--heheheh), but it never feels smooth(rear wheel bumps), sometimes I hit my chainring,
    > > and 1/3 of the time I fall or get stuck. I am so frustrated because I can't seem to figure out
    > > how to get over them easily after many, many times trying. Soooo, what do you all
    do
    > > when you see a log up ahead? And, what do you recommend me trying.
    I'll
    > > practice anything if it'll help.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Alan McClure
    >
    > Hop it. If its under 6", and i've got speed, I'll just jump the sucker.
    I
    > don't have a great bunny hop, its more of a lift both wheels at once clipless cheating thing, so
    > anything bigger than that and I do my second technique, which is basically a slow motion bunnyhop
    > (I've done it on logs up to approx 26"/wheelsize) -
    >
    > Approach log fairly slowly, but not superslow. Figure middle front, one
    of
    > the three largest rear. Rock backwards on the bike, pulling the bar with you, and get the front
    > wheel on the very top of the log. Try to stay forward on the bike, over the bars, when you get to
    > the log - if you're
    too
    > far back, then you'll simply run right into the log with the rear wheel
    and
    > fall. Ok, here's the important step - and its pretty hard to do without clipless. What you want to
    > do is pull up the rear wheel and put it on top of the log. At the same time, you want to throw the
    > front of the bike forwards and down. This is a VERY explosive move, you actually get both tires
    > off the ground for a bit. If you really do it well, and have enough speed, you can actually clear
    > the whole log this way. Usually, especially on bigger logs, you'll simply end up with the front
    > wheel down on the ground, and the rear wheel on top. If you had the speed perfect, and do
    it
    > right, then the wheel will come right off, and not even hit the top hard. If not, you can give a
    > very small pedal stroke and just watch your
    balance.
    >
    > Here's pretty much what I'm talking about, although Charlie doesn't quite get the rear wheel all
    > the way on top. Give 'im some slack tho, he is in his mid 60s (and can still outpace me anyday,
    > the guy's an animal!) http://pages.prodigy.com/CharlieB/log.htm
    >
    > Hope that helps.
    >
    > Jon Bond
    >
    >

    Jons got it. Though it seems the number 4 option around here is to scrounge the woods for enoungh
    sticks to build a pile over the 8" log. Please don't do this. Use Jons technique, just start small
    6-8" to get the timing down then larger logs are easier. Works for big rocks too. If you get the
    timing right and your 'lunge' is strong enough your chainring will clear almost anything. I've even
    used it in the city for hopping up on 2 foot tall walls.

    Mike
     
  14. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Trentus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Jon Bond" <Jonathan[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > > Here's pretty much what I'm talking about
    > <snip>
    > > http://pages.prodigy.com/CharlieB/log.htm
    >
    > My problem with this trick, is the fact that while learning it I'm almost certainly going to come
    > a gutser at least a couple of dozen times, and I just aint that keen on falling onto a hard log,
    > or off one even for that matter (strange I know)
    >
    > I get the concept, I just aint got the guts to go try it out.
    >

    Just start small to get the timing down until it becomes committed to 'muscle memory'. Then bigger
    stuff really becomes a 'no brainer'. ;^)

    Mike
     
  15. Alan McClure

    Alan McClure Guest

    Well it seems that there is pretty much a concensus on how to do this. So, I'll to exactly what is
    suggested, by starting with small logs, and working my way up to larger ones. I don't have trouble
    with 6 inchers, so maybe, it would be good to start with them, just to get the motion down, and then
    move to bigger ones. Thanks for all the advice to everyone, I'll keep you all updated when I am
    finally able to clear a 6 foot tall redwood log. I'm thinking by as early as next week. :)

    Oh, by the way, if anyone on here lives out in Missouri, specifically near Columbia, MO, and
    wouldn't mind riding sometime, I would enjoy it. There are of course, plenty of great trails all
    over the state, as long as it hasn't rained within the past few days.

    Thanks, Alan
     
  16. Dave Stocker

    Dave Stocker Guest

    "Alan McClure" <[email protected]> schrieb im Newsbeitrag news:[email protected]...
    > So, when most of you come across a log on the trail--let's say it is 8-12 inches tall.
    >
    > Do You:
    >
    > 1) get off and carry your bike over

    More often than not, yes.

    > 2) hop over it

    Sometimes, and if it is bigger than 6-8", I catch up on my chainring and it is not a pretty sight.

    > 3)bunny hop over it

    Only the small stuff.

    > 4)Other
    >
    >
    > You see, out of all the obstacles I come across, this is the only one that consistently stumps me.
    > I can get over them most of the time(especially when they are smaller--heheheh), but it never
    > feels smooth(rear wheel bumps), sometimes I hit my chainring, and 1/3 of the time I fall or get
    > stuck. I am so frustrated because I can't seem to figure out how to get over them easily after
    > many, many times trying. Soooo, what do you all do when you see a log up ahead? And, what do you
    > recommend me trying. I'll practice anything if it'll help.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Alan McClure
    >

    I gots the same problem.

    -Dave
     
  17. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

  18. Dave Stocker

    Dave Stocker Guest

    "Jon Bond" <[email protected]> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Approach log fairly slowly, but not superslow. Figure middle front, one
    of
    > the three largest rear. Rock backwards on the bike, pulling the bar with you, and get the front
    > wheel on the very top of the log.

    I have seen Charlie's webpage and I remember this tip. I know that in principle, I should not need
    strength to loft the front wheel. In practice I end up jerking the front up. Is there more to it?
    What are your legs doing? Is your butt moving horizontally or staying in place?

    >Try to stay forward on the bike, over the bars, when you get to the log - if you're
    too
    > far back, then you'll simply run right into the log with the rear wheel
    and
    > fall. Ok, here's the important step - and its pretty hard to do without clipless. What you want to
    > do is pull up the rear wheel and put it on top of the log. At the same time, you want to throw the
    > front of the bike forwards and down. This is a VERY explosive move, you actually get both tires
    > off the ground for a bit.

    Aha! This lift the back wheel up thing I can do smoothly. I will work on doing it directly following
    bring the front wheel up.

    >If you really do it well, and have enough speed, you can actually clear the whole log this way.
    >Usually, especially on bigger logs, you'll simply end up with the front wheel down on the ground,
    >and the rear wheel on top. If you had the speed perfect, and do
    it
    > right, then the wheel will come right off, and not even hit the top hard. If not, you can give a
    > very small pedal stroke and just watch your
    balance.
    >

    I suspect that I approach too slow. This might be part of my problem.

    > Here's pretty much what I'm talking about, although Charlie doesn't quite get the rear wheel all
    > the way on top. Give 'im some slack tho, he is in his mid 60s (and can still outpace me anyday,
    > the guy's an animal!) http://pages.prodigy.com/CharlieB/log.htm
    >
    > Hope that helps.
    >
    > Jon Bond
    >
    >

    Thanks, -Dave
     
  19. J'M Sm'Th

    J'M Sm'Th Guest

    Alan McClure wrote:
    >
    > Well it seems that there is pretty much a concensus on how to do this. So, I'll to exactly what is
    > suggested, by starting with small logs, and working my way up to larger ones. I don't have trouble
    > with 6 inchers, so maybe, it would be good to start with them, just to get the motion down, and
    > then move to bigger ones. Thanks for all the advice to everyone, I'll keep you all updated when I
    > am finally able to clear a 6 foot tall redwood log. I'm thinking by as early as next week. :)
    >
    > Oh, by the way, if anyone on here lives out in Missouri, specifically near Columbia, MO, and
    > wouldn't mind riding sometime, I would enjoy it. There are of course, plenty of great trails all
    > over the state, as long as it hasn't rained within the past few days.
    >
    > Thanks, Alan

    Hey Alan,

    Have you done Berryman Trail recently? Would be interested to know what kind of condition it is in.

    --
    J'm

    To Reply Direct, Remove Clothes. ...-.-
     
  20. Alan McClure

    Alan McClure Guest

Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...