Getting rid of aerobelly

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Markku Poysti, May 20, 2003.

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  1. Any opinions how to lose weight with a recumbent?

    I noticed that my weight dropped by about 5 kg when i started riding about 20 km/day. Now i'm
    trying to lose more by eating less. It gets rather interesting when you try to eat just enough to
    not bonk...
     
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  2. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    Weight is lost with a recumbent bicycle just as weight is lost in any other case. I am pleased with
    my weight loss. I'm 54 y.o., 74", <220# (down from 260#), 60 RHR, 100/60 BP & ex-smoker.

    I don't know what 'bonk' is beyond the anecdotal descriptions of it here. I suffer from postural
    syncope and may be familiar with y'all's symptoms of 'bonk' from that. The gray-outs and the
    fuzzies aren't cured by eating more.

    I ride 50 Km every day or so nearly so that I'm not abashed to say so. I usually ride on an empty
    stomach and prepare for the ride with a large pot of coffee and lots of water. For a long time I
    rode from porta-pottie to tree. I eat carefully after I've ridden. Which do you want to do,
    performance riding or performance eating? I prefer the latter and riding is just pleasant.

    A rule that I like is 'ride long not hard'. I save riding 'hard' for other times.

    "Markku Poysti" <[email protected]_nospam> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Any opinions how to lose weight with a recumbent?
    >
    > I noticed that my weight dropped by about 5 kg when i started riding about 20 km/day. Now i'm
    > trying to lose more by eating less. It gets rather interesting when you try to eat just enough to
    > not bonk...
     
  3. G19glock1

    G19glock1 Guest

    I am 52, ride about 30 miles everyday and try to eat sensibly. I have gone from 224lb to 204lb. Doc
    says I should be 180lb. You have to burn 3500 calories more than you take in to lose a pound of fat.
    In a two hour ride you (normal speed, i.e., my norm 13.5 mph) I burn about 1500 calories. If I eat
    about that a day I lose very slowly, but I do lose over time. Good luck and keep pedaling. "Doug
    Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Weight is lost with a recumbent bicycle just as weight is lost in any
    other
    > case. I am pleased with my weight loss. I'm 54 y.o., 74", <220# (down from 260#), 60 RHR, 100/60
    > BP & ex-smoker.
    >
    > I don't know what 'bonk' is beyond the anecdotal descriptions of it here.
    > I suffer from postural syncope and may be familiar with y'all's symptoms
    of
    > 'bonk' from that. The gray-outs and the fuzzies aren't cured by eating more.
    >
    > I ride 50 Km every day or so nearly so that I'm not abashed to say so. I usually ride on an empty
    > stomach and prepare for the ride with a large pot of coffee and lots of water. For a long time I
    > rode from porta-pottie to tree. I eat carefully after I've ridden. Which do you want to do,
    > performance riding or performance eating? I prefer the latter and riding
    is
    > just pleasant.
    >
    > A rule that I like is 'ride long not hard'. I save riding 'hard' for
    other
    > times.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Markku Poysti" <[email protected]_nospam> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Any opinions how to lose weight with a recumbent?
    > >
    > > I noticed that my weight dropped by about 5 kg when i started riding about 20 km/day. Now i'm
    > > trying to lose more by eating less. It gets rather interesting when you try to eat just enough
    > > to not bonk...
    > >
     
  4. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    Apropos your 'g19glock1' nom-de-net, I frequently CWP-CCW a H&K USPc .40 while riding. Makes for
    interesting and positive interactions with LEOs.

    "g19glock1" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I am 52, ride about 30 miles everyday and try to eat sensibly. I have
    gone
    > from 224lb to 204lb. Doc says I should be 180lb. You have to burn 3500 calories more than you take
    > in to lose a pound of fat. In a two hour ride you (normal speed, i.e., my norm 13.5 mph) I burn
    > about 1500 calories. If
    I
    > eat about that a day I lose very slowly, but I do lose over time. Good
    luck
    > and keep pedaling.
     
  5. bentcruiser

    bentcruiser New Member

    Joined:
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    I know several people who go through some crazy diets to lose weight. The best way to weight loss is through sensible eating. Barring any health restrictions from a doctor, you can eat whatever you want just take it in moderation. That is the cornerstone of the Weight Watchers' system.

    When I wanted to lose, i ate smaller portions, cut sodas to a minimum and I drank a lot of water. It helped tremendously.

    Derek


     
  6. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]_nospam says...
    > Any opinions how to lose weight with a recumbent?
    >
    > I noticed that my weight dropped by about 5 kg when i started riding about 20 km/day. Now i'm
    > trying to lose more by eating less. It gets rather interesting when you try to eat just enough to
    > not bonk...

    Simple math. You need to burn more calories than you eat. A differential of ~7500 kcals yields a
    weight loss or gain of 1 kg. Approximately 30 kcals/km of cycling means that you can lose 1 kg for
    every 250 km. traveled. Your body requires ~25kcal to maintain 1 kg body weight without exercise.

    By limiting the fat intake to 10% of your calories and carbohydrates to no more than 40%, you can
    successfully increase your cycling distance without risking 'the bonk'.

    Good Luck
    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  7. I see LEO and think Low Earth Orbit.

    "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Apropos your 'g19glock1' nom-de-net, I frequently CWP-CCW a H&K USPc .40 while riding. Makes for
    > interesting and positive interactions with LEOs.
    >
    >
    > "g19glock1" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > I am 52, ride about 30 miles everyday and try to eat sensibly. I have
    > gone
    > > from 224lb to 204lb. Doc says I should be 180lb. You have to burn 3500 calories more than you
    > > take in to lose a pound of fat. In a two hour
    ride
    > > you (normal speed, i.e., my norm 13.5 mph) I burn about 1500 calories.
    If
    > I
    > > eat about that a day I lose very slowly, but I do lose over time. Good
    > luck
    > > and keep pedaling.
     
  8. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    I see Glock and H&K and LEO and don't think Low Earth Orbit. Evidently you're not a
    'rocket-scientist'.

    "Timothy B. Storey" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I see LEO and think Low Earth Orbit.
    >
    > "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Apropos your 'g19glock1' nom-de-net, I frequently CWP-CCW a H&K USPc .40 while riding. Makes for
    > > interesting and positive interactions with
    LEOs.
    > >
    > >
    > > "g19glock1" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > I am 52, ride about 30 miles everyday and try to eat sensibly. I have
    > > gone
    > > > from 224lb to 204lb. Doc says I should be 180lb. You have to burn
    3500
    > > > calories more than you take in to lose a pound of fat. In a two hour
    > ride
    > > > you (normal speed, i.e., my norm 13.5 mph) I burn about 1500 calories.
    > If
    > > I
    > > > eat about that a day I lose very slowly, but I do lose over time.
    Good
    > > luck
    > > > and keep pedaling.
    > >
    > >
    >
     
  9. > I don't know what 'bonk' is beyond the anecdotal descriptions of it here. I suffer from postural
    > syncope and may be familiar with y'all's symptoms of 'bonk' from that. The gray-outs and the
    > fuzzies aren't cured by eating more.

    I guess it was bonk that happened to me at 70 km on my first 100 km trip this year. I started
    feeling weak and sick, and after the ride i was very hungry. As far as i know, this is due to low
    sugar level in blood, which happens when muscles run out of stored energy.

    Later i noticed that eating something (rye porridge) before the ride (and something also during the
    ride) cures the bonk problem, and also i'm not so hungry after the ride.

    Also AFAIK the speed of metabolism can be raised by riding so that fat burns faster also when
    not riding.
     
  10. Seth Jayson

    Seth Jayson Guest

    I've always been a skinny guy, so I can't speak from experience on trying to lose weight. I exercise
    for fun (running and biking) and I tend to stay around the same weight, the difference being that
    I'm just replacing fat (body fat in muscles, etc. I don't have much in the way of chunks) with more
    lean muscle. I think about caloric intake in order to avoid losing too much weight.

    That said, at its most basic, weight loss is a simple equation. Calories minus calories burned
    equals your weight loss or gain.

    Counting calories is a pretty effective way of figuring out what will happen. Keep track of how much
    you're putting in. Keep track of your exercise, and use calculations to estimate your caloric
    balance. If you are consistantly negative, you should be losing the stuff in that aerobelly.

    There are probably a zillion calculators on the web to help you with this stuff. I use the one at
    (shameless plug, you can call it. www.windycitysports.com-- right side of page, down a few scrolls)
    Their caloric needs calculator can give you a base line on what you need per day. The nutritional
    needs calculator shows you a breakdown on how you should get those calories: ratio of protein to
    carbs to fats.

    A simple plan would be to eat calories roughly equivalent to this total. If you assume this as your
    normal burn, without workout. Than anything you burn in your workout on top of this will represent a
    caloric deficit for that day. Since you have to get those calories somewhere, they will end up
    coming from reserves: (fat, if you have it, YAY! or Muscle, if you don't. Boo.)

    So, pretend you burn 2,500 calories a day just being you. You eat 2,500 calories that day. But then
    you bike long enough to burn an extra 400 calories. In a week, you burn about 2,800 calories more
    than you're taking in. A pound of body fat is roughly equivalent 3,500 calories. That week, you will
    have used up (lost) 4/5 of a pound.

    Not too bad! That's a reasonable target. Anyone who tells you you should be dropping weight more
    quickly than that isn't trying to sell you fitness, they're probably trying to sell you speed.

    This is oversimplified, but it's the best way to look at it until you really want to delve into it.
    And even then, there are lots of theories, reasonable to wacko.
     
  11. Seth Jayson

    Seth Jayson Guest

    With a quick search, I found a reasonable estimate that 2 hours of moderate-to-hard bicycling will
    burn about 500 calories. (That's my commute...)

    For the record, for me, running at a moderate pace for 35 minutes will burn about the same amount.
     
  12. Mlb

    Mlb Guest

    "Doug Huffman" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Weight is lost with a recumbent bicycle just as weight is lost in any other case. I am pleased
    > with my weight loss. I'm 54 y.o., 74", <220# (down from 260#), 60 RHR, 100/60 BP & ex-smoker.
    >
    > I don't know what 'bonk' is beyond the anecdotal descriptions of it here. I suffer from postural
    > syncope and may be familiar with y'all's symptoms of 'bonk' from that. The gray-outs and the
    > fuzzies aren't cured by eating more.
    >
    > I ride 50 Km every day or so nearly so that I'm not abashed to say so. I usually ride on an empty
    > stomach and prepare for the ride with a large pot of coffee and lots of water. For a long time I
    > rode from porta-pottie to tree. I eat carefully after I've ridden. Which do you want to do,
    > performance riding or performance eating? I prefer the latter and riding is just pleasant.
    >
    > A rule that I like is 'ride long not hard'. I save riding 'hard' for other times.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Markku Poysti" <[email protected]_nospam> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> Any opinions how to lose weight with a recumbent?
    >>
    >> I noticed that my weight dropped by about 5 kg when i started riding about 20 km/day. Now i'm
    >> trying to lose more by eating less. It gets rather interesting when you try to eat just enough to
    >> not bonk...
    >>
    >
    >
    >
    >

    bonk = glycogen depeltion = out of gas That totally whipped feeling when you know there's nothing
    more "in the tank".
     
  13. Bri

    Bri Guest

    I'm trying to do a similar feat. It is tough but I think it's just eat lots of veggies, fish, fruits
    and ride a lot. Burn more cals that you take in and you will lose weight. It would be a good Idea to
    do other exercises too because from my experience the recumbent bike doesn't make much use of upper
    body muscles. I use a weight machine to work out those and switch off to the mountain bike and
    unicycle for exercising those leg muscles that the recumbent doesn't get. My Dr. says "you've got
    quite a gut on you, better lose at least 20 lbs and lower your bad cholesterol or suffer heart
    disease", so with that in mind the losing the weight and cutting out the beef and fat isn't so hard.
    And it's the best incentive that I can think of since dieting sucks :) Keep working on it and the
    weight will disappear. L8R, Bri.

    Markku Poysti wrote:
    >
    > Any opinions how to lose weight with a recumbent?
    >
    > I noticed that my weight dropped by about 5 kg when i started riding about 20 km/day. Now i'm
    > trying to lose more by eating less. It gets rather interesting when you try to eat just enough to
    > not bonk...
     
  14. Bill Anton

    Bill Anton Guest

    Try restricting your carbohydrate intake, abstaining from all refined sugars and refined flours and
    starches. Atkins worked for me, but there are other variations on this theme as well. So far I've
    lost most of my aerobelly, to the point where I had to adjust my OSS bars closer to what's left of
    it. For me, what I've liked best about this high protein diet is that my appetite is quite
    manageable and that I've actually increased muscle mass while dropping pounds. With other diets
    (I've done Nutri-System in the past) I have lost muscle along with the fat and actually found that I
    was slower climbing hills after dropping the weight.

    Also, try gradually increasing your daily mileage (schedule permitting) and also add some
    occasional cross-training like walking/jogging, basketball, stairmaster, or circuit weight
    training. If you eat energy bars during/after a ride, try a low-carb, high protein bar instead to
    help with muscle recovery.

    Bill Anton 2001 Vision R-40 SWB OSS Lubbock, TX, USA

    [email protected]_nospam (Markku Poysti) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Any opinions how to lose weight with a recumbent?
    >
    > I noticed that my weight dropped by about 5 kg when i started riding about 20 km/day. Now i'm
    > trying to lose more by eating less. It gets rather interesting when you try to eat just enough to
    > not bonk...
     
  15. Jon Meinecke

    Jon Meinecke Guest

    On 20 May 2003 08:59:54 -0700, [email protected] (Seth Jayson) wrote:

    >With a quick search, I found a reasonable estimate that 2 hours of moderate-to-hard bicycling will
    >burn about 500 calories. (That's my commute...)

    Hmm, that seems a bit slow/low... An often quoted rule of thumb is about 50 calories per mile. 500
    calories in two hours would be 5 MPH....

    The first web source I just looked at says for a 175 lb. person calories burned per hour is indeed
    close to the 50/mile estimate:

    Bicycling: 12-13.9 mph = 672 Bicycling: 14-15.9 mph = 840 Bicycling: 16-19 mph = 1008 Bicycling:
    > 20 mph = 1386

    Many heart rate monitors have a calories burned estimate. Mine seems to match the 50/mile rule
    fairly closely.

    If you like 'gadgets' then a HRM may help in weight loss and aerobic conditioning. There's some
    thought that exercising at lower intensity for longer periods may burn fat more quickly... The
    argument goes that fat can only be metabolized at a certain maximum rate. If so, a HRM can help you
    keep in the lower end of your HR range...

    Different dieting strategies work for different people. In a regieme of limiting caloric intake
    (balanced) and increasing caloric burn (biking), one thing that helped me was eating small 'meals'
    (snacks) more often through out the day.

    Even a "slow" loss rate of 1 lb per week will leave you 50 lbs lighter in a year. Life-style change
    is probably required to make weight loss 'stick'...

    Jon Meinecke
     
  16. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    You might get some reasonable estimates here:

    http://www.kreuzotter.de/english/espeed.htm

    Lots of input factors including different types of bike and even more on types of recumbents!

    More than you want to know I'm sure.

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > On 20 May 2003 08:59:54 -0700, [email protected] (Seth Jayson) wrote:
    >
    > >With a quick search, I found a reasonable estimate that 2 hours of moderate-to-hard bicycling
    > >will burn about 500 calories. (That's my commute...)
    >
    > Hmm, that seems a bit slow/low... An often quoted rule of thumb is about 50 calories per mile. 500
    > calories in two hours would be 5 MPH....
    >
    > The first web source I just looked at says for a 175 lb. person calories burned per hour is indeed
    > close to the 50/mile estimate:
    >
    > Bicycling: 12-13.9 mph = 672 Bicycling: 14-15.9 mph = 840 Bicycling: 16-19 mph = 1008
    > Bicycling: > 20 mph = 1386
    >
    > Many heart rate monitors have a calories burned estimate. Mine seems to match the 50/mile rule
    > fairly closely.
    >
    > If you like 'gadgets' then a HRM may help in weight loss and aerobic conditioning. There's some
    > thought that exercising at lower intensity for longer periods may burn fat more quickly... The
    > argument goes that fat can only be metabolized at a certain maximum rate. If so, a HRM can help
    > you keep in the lower end of your HR range...
    >
    > Different dieting strategies work for different people. In a regieme of limiting caloric intake
    > (balanced) and increasing caloric burn (biking), one thing that helped me was eating small 'meals'
    > (snacks) more often through out the day.
    >
    > Even a "slow" loss rate of 1 lb per week will leave you 50 lbs lighter in a year. Life-style
    > change is probably required to make weight loss 'stick'...
    >
    > Jon Meinecke
    >
    >

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  17. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On 20 May 2003 08:37:54 GMT, [email protected]_nospam (Markku Poysti) wrote:

    >Any opinions how to lose weight with a recumbent? I noticed that my weight dropped by about 5 kg
    >when i started riding about 20 km/day. Now i'm trying to lose more by eating less. It gets rather
    >interesting when you try to eat just enough to not bonk...

    At the risk of sounding trite, to lose weight with a recumbent:
    1. Climb on recumbent
    2. Ride
    3. Repeat

    The more you do 3, the better :)

    OK, serious point: you dropped 5kg. You can't drop mass unless you're burning more than you're
    consuming, so if you keep eatingthe same and exercising the same you'll keep losing weight.

    In this case exercising the same means keep the time the same but ride harder and faster as you
    get fitter.

    One guy's opinion, why should you care? But it worked for me - I now weigh nearly 30lb less than I
    used to and I maintain it by riding a recumbent bike 15 miles per day commuting. I still eat pizza
    and drink beer.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  18. Harryo

    Harryo Guest

    Cletus Lee <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]_nospam says...
    > > Any opinions how to lose weight with a recumbent?
    > >
    > > I noticed that my weight dropped by about 5 kg when i started riding about 20 km/day. Now i'm
    > > trying to lose more by eating less. It gets rather interesting when you try to eat just enough
    > > to not bonk...
    >
    > Simple math. You need to burn more calories than you eat.

    About 3 years ago, I lost an extreme amount of weight and have kept it off since that time. Some
    people were a bit pissed off when they asked how I did it and I replied the same as Cletus, simply
    burn more calories that you eat. It is the same thing we have been told over and over, diet and
    exercise. This is the easy part. The harder part is motivation. That is something no one else can
    give you, although encouragement from others can be turned into personal motivation. You have to
    make up YOUR mind that you will do what it takes to succeed and refuse to fail.

    Harry Jiles
     
  19. Harryo

    Harryo Guest

    "g19glock1" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > In a two hour ride you (normal speed, i.e., my norm 13.5 mph) I burn about 1500 calories. If I eat
    > about that a day I lose very slowly, but I do lose over time. Good luck

    You might be a bit optimistic on your calorie expenditure. I would say that a 2 hour ride, at 13.5
    mph average, would only burn about half the calories you state, or about 750, unless it was
    extremely hilly and/or windy.

    I bring this up because if one is seriously trying to lose weight, accurate measurements of caloric
    intake, and output, are neccesary.

    Harry Jiles
     
  20. Geob

    Geob Guest

    > I know several people who go through some crazy diets to lose weight.

    I don't want a crazy diet. I want to make small incremental SUSTAINABLE changes in my habits. Fast
    dieting may work against you by consuming muscle-mass first, which our bodies are prone to do.

    > The best way to weight loss is through sensible eating.

    Hear! Hear! But how do we get there? I am no expert, but doing the math shows that looking over our
    diet and eliminating just a few things can start us losing weight. What are your habits? What about
    sodas? Candy? Desert? I don't eat desert any more. Well, sometimes. Mashed potatos? OK, but fergit
    the gravy! :)

    Natchurley, these efforts would be for naught if your serving sizes are out of control. Some folks
    need to investigate the root causes of their over-eating. Many of us aero-bellies use food like an
    alcoholic uses booze. Though we don't realize it as we are deeply in denial. Buried core emotional
    issues are 'buried alive' and will still effect you. These things generally CAN be dealt with, but
    not alone. Many big churches have excellent programs that can help in this area.

    A doctor I talked to, who wuz into nutrition, suggested that sipping small amounts of fruit juice
    throughout the day can actually help you lose weight, if you are hungry alla time. I don't know how
    to judge this advice, but sections of the book "Cycling past 50" or sumthin like that, say (and I
    need to review this) that to generate energy our body burns glucose and glycogen. Glycogen is the
    fat. Having the glucose on hand makes it a bit easier. But correct me if I am wrong. The doctor said
    that when fasting (to whatever extent) our bodies go into 'economy mode' and our energy level goes
    down, our temperature might also, and we burn much less energy. We don't want this, thus the fruit
    juice to help keep the metabolism up and ticking.

    Keep in mind that the RMR (resting metabolic rate) (and I drop this term in order to make this
    drivel sound like expert advice) depends partly on muscle mass. It is good to build up muscle mass
    because it burns energy all the time! So maybe you should consider some vigorous riding along with
    you long distance, in order to build up the muscles. Or weight lift or sumthin.

    > Barring any health restrictions from a doctor, you can eat whatever you want just take it in
    > moderation. That is the cornerstone of the Weight Watchers' system.

    I personally don't like the weight-watcher org, but know that they have helped a lot of people. I
    followed their diet exactly, but did it at a time when I was locked to my desk. I was a software
    developer and this was during a critical phase of my development of a large system. They didn't warn
    me, or warn me loud enough, that I would burn muscles first, which I did. I had heavily muscled
    arms, shoulders, well.. everything. Most of my weight seemed to come off my arms and shoulders. Plus
    they used a simple formula to tell me how much I could eat, and I lost weight too fast. I am a
    mesomorph and have a good deal more muscle mass in relation to my fat than most aero-bellies I know
    personally and their numbers didn't acount for this. I should have eaten better, exercised, and
    taken weight off slower.

    > When I wanted to lose, I ate smaller portions, cut sodas to a minimum and I drank a lot of water.
    > It helped tremendously.

    I would further suggest that changes like this become part of your habitual daily life.
    Dieting/gaining weight cycles are harmful.

    An issue of the Promise Keepers (don't remember the name or date) magazine had an article on this a
    few years ago. It basically proclaimed we should strive to eat less fat. It says more, I need to
    re-read it when I can find it. I do things like using like 1/4 as much butter or margeine as I'd
    normally do. None on bread, just a tiny bit on my ten-grain cereal.

    For smacks.. er.. I mean 'snacks' I use popcorn, fruit juice, lots of V8 juice here at work. I
    noticed on the package, the butter-free popcorn model had more calories than the butterful one. Go
    figger. Maybe another brand would be different. An Evil Woman has a bookshelf in a public area with
    about 20 different types of candy, just sitting there, that I am welcome to munch on. I am learning
    to use a different corredor. I just say to her peanut M&M's.. "My body no longer craves this kind of
    thing". Now if I could get my wife to stop dragging icecream 'n stuff home. She says I should have
    more self control. I respond, "I have enough self control to not buy the stuff in the first place!"

    "Getting rid of Aerobelly" -or- "My sins are ever before me" :)

    GeoB
     
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