getting used to heights

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by MIB, Dec 25, 2004.

  1. MIB

    MIB Guest

    Merry Christmas to all

    In the Lake District

    Would any of the NG have a list of walks to start at the beginning to help
    getting used to heights or at least a few to start with.

    Basically I just want to get used to ridges and scrambles and I would like
    to have a crack at Sharp Edge some time next year.

    Cheers
    --
    Dave (MIB)
    from Co. Durham
    ________________________
    http://www.daveritchie.com
     
    Tags:


  2. Jhimmy

    Jhimmy Guest

    I'd recommend: from easy to hardish.

    1. North ridge of Catbells - nice and easy but with some clambering.
    2. Skidaw via Ullock Pike and Long side.
    3. Hartsop Dodd, starting from Hartsop
    4. Helm Crag
    5. Helvellyn, by Striding edge
    6. Jacks rake (Pavey Ark)
    7. Sharp edge

    Not all are scrambles, but they do have a sense of exposure that gets your
    senses attuned to heights.

    Remember, through, Sharp Edge has a much greater exposure. Keep away from
    it in windy and/or wet days. There's only a 10 minute section that's
    exposed so it passes very quickly.


    Jhimmy.
    Merry Xmas
     
  3. Mike Hill

    Mike Hill Guest

    On Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:45:31 -0000, "MIB" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Merry Christmas to all
    >
    >In the Lake District
    >
    >Would any of the NG have a list of walks to start at the beginning to help
    >getting used to heights or at least a few to start with.
    >
    >Basically I just want to get used to ridges and scrambles and I would like
    >to have a crack at Sharp Edge some time next year.
    >
    >Cheers


    If you are available around the 22nd of Jan to the 27th I'll be doing
    SE :) You could hold my hand LOL ! Seriously, I wouldn't mind some
    company.
    Mike.
    --


    '02 GSF1200 in silver : RD250LC (not at all mint, yet)
    www.rivingtonbarn.com (Rivvy website)
    http://www.rivingtonbarn.com/phpbb/portal.php (Forum)
    Email address spamtrapped.
    Remove "your clothes" to reply.
     
  4. "Jhimmy" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I'd recommend: from easy to hardish.
    >
    > 1. North ridge of Catbells - nice and easy but with some clambering.
    > 2. Skidaw via Ullock Pike and Long side.
    > 3. Hartsop Dodd, starting from Hartsop
    > 4. Helm Crag
    > 5. Helvellyn, by Striding edge
    > 6. Jacks rake (Pavey Ark)
    > 7. Sharp edge
    >
    > Not all are scrambles, but they do have a sense of exposure that gets
    > your senses attuned to heights.
    >


    I'll add the climb around the Old Man of Coniston and along to Dow Crag.
    Somewhere at the top of your list.

    > Remember, through, Sharp Edge has a much greater exposure. Keep away
    > from it in windy and/or wet days. There's only a 10 minute section
    > that's exposed so it passes very quickly.


    Yes, it's a different sort of ridge really. i.e. not remotely
    horizontal.

    --
    Adrian
     
  5. On Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:45:31 -0000, "MIB" <[email protected]> wrote:

    | Merry Christmas to all
    |
    | In the Lake District
    |
    | Would any of the NG have a list of walks to start at the beginning to help
    | getting used to heights or at least a few to start with.

    A non walking idea.

    On the principle that fear of heights is mainly in the mind. Try relaxation
    http://www.patient.co.uk/showdoc/27000363/ to wind yourself down. Yes you
    can relax some muscle groups on a mountain. It takes some time to be able
    to do this at will.


    --
    Dave F
     
  6. roger

    roger Guest

    The message <[email protected]>
    from Adrian Tupper <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > > Remember, through, Sharp Edge has a much greater exposure. Keep away
    > > from it in windy and/or wet days. There's only a 10 minute section
    > > that's exposed so it passes very quickly.


    > Yes, it's a different sort of ridge really. i.e. not remotely
    > horizontal.


    <Pedant mode>

    Sharp Edge itself is horizontal. It is the steep crag at the end that is
    the hard bit.

    <Pedant mode off>

    The crag at the end goes by the name of Foula Crag or something similar.
    Being away from home I can't actually look it up atm and the spill
    chucker won't have a clue how to spell it. :)

    --
    Roger Exiled in Essex looking North to the Water Tower, South
    to the Tower on The Naze and East to the Roughs Tower.
     
  7. MIB

    MIB Guest

    Happy Boxing day to all

    Cheer Mike - thanks for the offer but I dont think I would be up to SE in
    Jan.

    However I'll take you up on the offer some time next year.

    Cheers

    --
    Dave (MIB)
    from Co. Durham
    ________________________
    http://www.daveritchie.com



    "Mike Hill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sat, 25 Dec 2004 17:45:31 -0000, "MIB" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Merry Christmas to all
    >>
    >>In the Lake District
    >>
    >>Would any of the NG have a list of walks to start at the beginning to help
    >>getting used to heights or at least a few to start with.
    >>
    >>Basically I just want to get used to ridges and scrambles and I would like
    >>to have a crack at Sharp Edge some time next year.
    >>
    >>Cheers

    >
    > If you are available around the 22nd of Jan to the 27th I'll be doing
    > SE :) You could hold my hand LOL ! Seriously, I wouldn't mind some
    > company.
    > Mike.
    > --
    >
    >
    > '02 GSF1200 in silver : RD250LC (not at all mint, yet)
    > www.rivingtonbarn.com (Rivvy website)
    > http://www.rivingtonbarn.com/phpbb/portal.php (Forum)
    > Email address spamtrapped.
    > Remove "your clothes" to reply.
     
  8. Mike Hill

    Mike Hill Guest

    On Sun, 26 Dec 2004 13:21:44 -0000, "MIB" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Happy Boxing day to all
    >
    >Cheer Mike - thanks for the offer but I dont think I would be up to SE in
    >Jan.
    >
    >However I'll take you up on the offer some time next year.
    >
    >Cheers

    No problem, post again later in the year.
    Mike.
    --


    '02 GSF1200 in silver : RD250LC (not at all mint, yet)
    www.rivingtonbarn.com (Rivvy website)
    http://www.rivingtonbarn.com/phpbb/portal.php (Forum)
    Email address spamtrapped.
    Remove "your clothes" to reply.
     
  9. Lee

    Lee Guest

    "roger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > Sharp Edge itself is horizontal. It is the steep crag at the end that is
    > the hard bit.


    I thought the bit at the end were great, the wind picked up just in time to
    make the ridge at bit scary!

    Lee

    --
    http://lee-perry.co.uk
     
  10. MIB wrote

    > Would any of the NG have a list of walks to start at the beginning to help
    > getting used to heights or at least a few to start with.
    >
    > Basically I just want to get used to ridges and scrambles and I would like
    > to have a crack at Sharp Edge some time next year.


    I used to get vertigo quite badly and still get sweaty palms just talking
    about climbing but without doubt for me the best way of aclimatising
    to it was through climbing. If you've not been on a beginners climbing
    course then it would be a good first approach. Also, don't rush straight
    onto the edges but work up to it with some narrow ridge walks and
    some easy, non-ridge scrambling. Eventually you'll find the confidence to
    have a go at the harder stuff. Crib Goch still scares the pants off me.

    Chris
     
  11. W. D. Grey

    W. D. Grey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Chris Gilbert
    <[email protected]> writes
    >I used to get vertigo quite badly and still get sweaty palms just talking
    >about climbing but without doubt for me the best way of aclimatising
    >to it was through climbing.


    Gordon will remember our RAF days when we had to undergo a civilian
    fire-fighting course at Chorley. For those of us not accustomed to
    heights, climbing the escape ladder was not a pleasant experience. After
    two weeks of ladder work it became considerably less daunting. The
    finale was to carry someone down from a roof across your shoulders down
    a ladder.

    Practice makes perfect as they say.
    --
    Bill Grey
    http://www.billboy.co.uk
     
  12. W. D. Grey <[email protected]> writes
    >In article <[email protected]>, Chris Gilbert
    ><[email protected]> writes
    >>I used to get vertigo quite badly and still get sweaty palms just talking
    >>about climbing but without doubt for me the best way of aclimatising
    >>to it was through climbing.

    >
    >Gordon will remember our RAF days when we had to undergo a civilian
    >fire-fighting course at Chorley. For those of us not accustomed to
    >heights, climbing the escape ladder was not a pleasant experience.
    >After two weeks of ladder work it became considerably less daunting.
    >The finale was to carry someone down from a roof across your shoulders
    >down a ladder.
    >
    >Practice makes perfect as they say.


    And the worst bit was being carried down by another amateur like
    yourself!
    --
    Gordon Harris
     
  13. W. D. Grey

    W. D. Grey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Gordon Harris
    <[email protected]> writes
    >>Practice makes perfect as they say.

    >
    >And the worst bit was being carried down by another amateur like
    >yourself!
    >--


    True, We had to pair off with someone of approximately our own weight,
    and I was about 13.5 stone at the time. It was scary being carried down.
    --
    Bill Grey
    http://www.billboy.co.uk
     
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