GI index of gels and food

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by zaskar, Oct 31, 2004.

  1. zaskar

    zaskar New Member

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    Anyone know how to figure out the GI of foods? i found a few list on the net, but they are pretty small list.is there a way to figure out the GI based on grms of carbs sugars ect?
     
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  2. zaskar

    zaskar New Member

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    What im reading on the net, few sites say bananas are hi gi another says bananas are low gi wich is it? also what about honey? honeystinger.com says its low gi another site say honey is a high gi.is what im trying do do is eat low gi thru out the day and eat high gi after after cycling. theres just to much conflicting information on the net.
     
  3. KakenBetaal

    KakenBetaal New Member

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    If you mix foods, say some high GI with either or both protein or fat containing foods, the GI effectively becomes low since the protein/fat slows down absorbtion a lot.
     
  4. Smartt/RST

    Smartt/RST New Member

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    I can tell you that bananas are low GI when ther are greenish, and high GI when very ripe. However, as was previously posted, something called GI Load is more the issue. Anytime you mix foods, you mix their GI qualities. So you could have a very ripe banana (high GI) with peanut butter (very, very low GI) and have a generally low to moderate GI meal.
    However, the overall effectivenss of "eating by GI" is modest at best, so I wouldn't get carried away with it (i.e.: feel like it needs to drive all of your food choices). Eating enough carbs before, during and after cycling (just in general) is the most important factor for fueling and recovering from exercise.
    As to the confusion on the GI Index of certain foods (eg: honey), you've got me there. But if someone is selling the product that they are giving information on, that's a conflict of interests...look elsewhere.
     
  5. tomUK

    tomUK New Member

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    I have in the past looked into this subject and to quote a source...

    'A 50-gram dose of protein (in the form of very lean beef) resulted in only about 2 grams of glucose being produced and released into circulation. Neither does adding protein to carbohydrate slow the absorption or peak of the glucose response.

    Fat delays the peak but not the total glucose response, according to these new studies. Therefore, it looks like you can simply ignore protein and fat in mixed meal calculations.'

    Source:

    Franz, Marion J. "Protein Controversies in Diabetes." Diabetes Spectrum, Volume 13, Number 3, 2000, pages 132-141. The URL is
    http://journal.diabetes.org/diabetesspectrum/00v13n3/pg132.htm

    Gannon MC, Nuttall JA, Damberg G, Gupta V, Nuttall FQ. "Effect of Protein Ingestion on the Glucose Appearance Rate in People with Type 2 Diabetes" The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 86, March 2001, pages 1040-1047. The URL is
    http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/full/86/3/1040
     
  6. Jhikers

    Jhikers New Member

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    Checkout the GI database at:

    http://www.glycemicindex.com/

    this is the site by the people from the Sydney University in New South Wales, Australia - who are behind the majority of studies into the GI Factor.

    Type in "< 55" in the GI Database search - to get a list of all Low GI foods and "> 55" for a list of all High GI foods.

    Top site, top book - The New Glucose Revolution
     
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