Giant NRS 1 wooo...

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Flyingcowbells, Jan 31, 2003.

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  1. Hi all,

    I've just test rode a Giant NRS1, really liked it... Except the rear deraileur kept on shifting
    gears in the medium to low gear when I applied a good amount of torque when going up hill. (although
    the folks at LBS says it's probably the cable stretching when new. I also test rode a Specialized
    Epic. More expensive but I didn't really like the feel of it. Although I must say I tested it in the
    urban environment but did jump a few stacks of stairs and other more interesting obstacles. on that
    day I also tried an NRS2. Didn't liked it at all (should I say cable disk brakes sucks :p).

    Anyhow, I plan to get the NRS1, any of you folks have any comments?

    Ta!

    Bill.
     
    Tags:


  2. "flyingcowbells" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I've just test rode a Giant NRS1, really liked it... Except the rear deraileur kept on shifting
    > gears in the medium to low gear when I applied a good amount of torque when going up hill.
    > (although the folks at LBS says it's probably the cable stretching when new. I also test rode a
    > Specialized Epic. More expensive but I didn't really like the feel of it. Although I must say I
    > tested it in the urban environment but did jump a few stacks of stairs and other more interesting
    > obstacles. on that day I also tried an NRS2. Didn't liked it at all (should I say cable disk
    > brakes sucks :p).
    >
    > Anyhow, I plan to get the NRS1, any of you folks have any comments?
    >
    > Ta!
    >
    > Bill.
    Cable stretch, then returning while you are riding the bike. BS! Cable stretch occurs, but somewhat
    slowly over the first few days/weeks/months (depends on how much you ride) of the life of new
    cables. Not all of the sudden when the rear suspension is activated, then returns once the
    suspension stops. Several full sus bikes have had problems with "ghost shifting" when the rear is
    active, but often it is caused by bad cabling on the part of the guy/gal who puts the bike together.
    I've done it myself.

    I'm glad you like the bike, bikes are ridden more when you like them, and IMHO, that is the most
    important part of buying a new bike. But get this shifting problem fixed, you should not tollerate
    it and it should be pretty easy to fix. My guess, cable housing is too short for the rear mech. near
    the top tube/seat tube intersection, but I don't know the bike.

    Oh, and ride the snot out of it!
    --
    Craig Brossman, Durango Colorado
     
  3. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "flyingcowbells" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I've just test rode a Giant NRS1, really liked it... Except the rear deraileur kept on shifting
    > gears in the medium to low gear when I applied a good amount of torque when going up hill.
    > (although the folks at LBS says it's probably the cable stretching when new. I also test rode a
    > Specialized Epic. More expensive but I didn't really like the feel of it. Although I must say I
    > tested it in the urban environment but did jump a few stacks of stairs and other more interesting
    > obstacles. on that day I also tried an NRS2. Didn't liked it at all (should I say cable disk
    > brakes sucks :p).
    >
    > Anyhow, I plan to get the NRS1, any of you folks have any comments?
    >
    > Ta!
    >
    > Bill.

    IIRC, there was a problem with the NRS ghost shifting because of where the cable stops are on the
    rear triangle. It is slightly pulling on the rear mech as it moved through it's travel. The fix was
    to bypass these by running a continuous length of housing from the last stop on the top tube to the
    rear derailleur. The SRAM ESP 1:1 actuation ratio is more immune to this effect because it requires
    twice the cable pull than Shimano to shift gears.

    HTH

    Mike
     
  4. Darsh

    Darsh Guest

    "Craig Brossman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "flyingcowbells" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Hi all,
    > >
    > > I've just test rode a Giant NRS1, really liked it... Except the rear deraileur kept on shifting
    > > gears in the medium to low gear when I applied a good amount of torque when going up hill.
    > > (although the folks at LBS says it's probably the cable stretching when new. I also test rode a
    > > Specialized Epic. More expensive but I didn't really like the feel of it. Although I must say I
    > > tested it in the urban environment but did jump a few stacks of stairs and other more
    > > interesting obstacles. on that day I also tried an NRS2. Didn't liked it at all (should I say
    > > cable disk brakes sucks :p).
    > >
    > > Anyhow, I plan to get the NRS1, any of you folks have any comments?
    > >
    > > Ta!
    > >
    > > Bill.
    > Cable stretch, then returning while you are riding the bike. BS! Cable stretch occurs, but
    > somewhat slowly over the first few days/weeks/months (depends on how much you ride) of the life of
    > new cables.

    Cable stretch happens IMMEDIATELY. It is not unlike a guitar string. When initially installed, I
    like to give it an immediate heavy stretch, otherwise, you are tuning every 5 minutes for a bit.

    Bike cable are not very different. The first shifts in a cables life stretches it more than at any
    point in it's life. If the cables were installed, and given only a few shifts, the cables were never
    stretched initially. (as I find is the case in most LBS builds)

    One simple test ride in enough to put rear shifting out of wack.

    darsh

    Not all of the
    > sudden when the rear suspension is activated, then returns once the suspension stops. Several full
    > sus bikes have had problems with "ghost shifting" when the
    rear
    > is active, but often it is caused by bad cabling on the part of the
    guy/gal
    > who puts the bike together. I've done it myself.
    >
    > I'm glad you like the bike, bikes are ridden more when you like them, and IMHO, that is the most
    > important part of buying a new bike. But get this shifting problem fixed, you should not tollerate
    > it and it should be
    pretty
    > easy to fix. My guess, cable housing is too short for the rear mech. near the top tube/seat tube
    > intersection, but I don't know the bike.
    >
    > Oh, and ride the snot out of it!
    > --
    > Craig Brossman, Durango Colorado
     
  5. Simon

    Simon Guest

    "Darsh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]... <snip>

    | > Cable stretch, then returning while you are riding the bike. BS! Cable stretch occurs, but
    | > somewhat slowly over the first few days/weeks/months (depends on how much you ride) of the life
    | > of new cables.
    |
    | Cable stretch happens IMMEDIATELY. It is not unlike a guitar string.
    When
    | initially installed, I like to give it an immediate heavy stretch, otherwise, you are tuning every
    | 5 minutes for a bit.
    |
    | Bike cable are not very different. The first shifts in a cables life stretches it more than at any
    | point in it's life. If the cables were installed, and given only a few shifts, the cables were
    | never stretched initially. (as I find is the case in most LBS builds)
    |
    | One simple test ride in enough to put rear shifting out of wack.
    |
    | darsh
    |
    Darsh your comments got me wondering for a minute there as I always thought cables stretched over
    time. So I done some searching, reading and noting and found........they do stretch over time. I
    cant find any references to back up that cables stretch immediately "only".

    I have found through personal experience that prestretched cables do stretch slightly upon first
    installation and then remain constant, was it this you were referring to?

    Would be interested to know which it is.

    Simon.
     
  6. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Simon wrote:

    > | Cable stretch happens IMMEDIATELY. It is not unlike a guitar string.
    > When
    > | initially installed, I like to give it an immediate heavy stretch, otherwise, you are tuning
    > | every 5 minutes for a bit.
    > |
    > | Bike cable are not very different. The first shifts in a cables life stretches it more than at
    > | any point in it's life. If the cables were installed, and given only a few shifts, the cables
    > | were never stretched initially. (as I find is the case in most LBS builds)
    > |
    > | One simple test ride in enough to put rear shifting out of wack.
    > |
    > | darsh
    > |
    > Darsh your comments got me wondering for a minute there as I always thought cables stretched over
    > time. So I done some searching, reading and noting and found........they do stretch over time. I
    > cant find any references to back up that cables stretch immediately "only".
    >
    > I have found through personal experience that prestretched cables do stretch slightly upon first
    > installation and then remain constant, was it this you were referring to?
    >
    > Would be interested to know which it is.

    I think Darsh's point was that normal cables /start/ stretching immediately. Usually, after a few
    weeks of moderate use, a cable will have stretched to its limit.
     
  7. Darsh

    Darsh Guest

    "Simon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Darsh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]... <snip>
    >
    > | > Cable stretch, then returning while you are riding the bike. BS! Cable stretch occurs, but
    > | > somewhat slowly over the first few
    days/weeks/months
    > | > (depends on how much you ride) of the life of new cables.
    > |
    > | Cable stretch happens IMMEDIATELY. It is not unlike a guitar string.
    > When
    > | initially installed, I like to give it an immediate heavy stretch, otherwise, you are tuning
    > | every 5 minutes for a bit.
    > |
    > | Bike cable are not very different. The first shifts in a cables life stretches it more than at
    > | any point in it's usable life. If the cables
    were
    > | installed, and given only a few shifts, the cables were never stretched initially. (as I find is
    > | the case in most LBS builds)
    > |
    > | One simple test ride in enough to put rear shifting out of wack.
    > |
    > | darsh
    > |
    > Darsh your comments got me wondering for a minute there as I always
    thought
    > cables stretched over time. So I done some searching, reading and noting
    and
    > found........they do stretch over time. I cant find any references to back up that cables stretch
    > immediately "only".

    They do stretch over time. Don't know why you put 'only' in quotes. I never said only, but I
    understand your interpretation of what I wrote.

    Of course all through the life of a wound cable, it will stretch. It is obvious that most of this
    stretching happens when the cable is new. The stretching of the cable is not consistent throughout
    it's life though.

    >
    > I have found through personal experience that prestretched cables do
    stretch
    > slightly upon first installation and then remain constant, was it this you were referring to?

    Prestretched or not, the stretching will occur on initial use, and taper off as the steel settles in
    to it's prime elasticity point. Being one of the most elastic substances on the planet, steel
    naturally finds it's point of elasticity and holds it for quite some time. It does not hold it
    forever, and eventually begins to stretch itself to death.

    Take a new rubber band and measure it's circumference. Stretch it nice and tight and release. You
    will notice the rubber band has a larger circumference than it did before the test. It did not
    retain a lot of it's original elasticity. Now stretch the rubber band again. Now note the change
    in circumference. The circumference is larger, but the change is not as considerable as the first
    test pull.

    This will continue until the rubberband breaks. Sure the rubber looses some of the elasticity as you
    test it over and over, but the difference should start to look like a common logarithmic graph.

    The cable or rubberband will never remain constant, it will always stretch when stressed, but the
    original lose of elasticity is never matched through the life of the cable. The life of the cable
    is determined by it's ability to hold it's elastic properties, or when it breaks, whatever
    happens first.
    >
    > Would be interested to know which it is.

    Don't know if this clarifies something. I am no professor. I only have experience and opinion to
    base my findings upon.

    I install a new cable and ride about 50 feet down the road shifting like mad, stressing the cable.
    It does not take much to stretch the perfectly adjusted, pre-stretched cable to the point of out of
    adjustment shifting.

    Sometimes I repeat the shifting procedure twice. I then adjust, and the shifting stays where
    I want it.

    Taking a bike off the rack, riding it on a test and experiencing shifting problems, seems to me a
    very common experience.

    "So, how did you like it?"

    "Well if felt OK, but it didn't shift very well."

    "Yea, that is just cable stretch, it happens with new cables. We'll set you up with a free 30-day
    tune-up to correct that after the cables settle in."

    What bike mechanic/salesman has not had a similar conversation?

    darsh

    >
    > Simon.
     
  8. Darsh

    Darsh Guest

    "bomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Simon wrote:
    >
    > > | Cable stretch happens IMMEDIATELY. It is not unlike a guitar string.
    > > When
    > > | initially installed, I like to give it an immediate heavy stretch, otherwise, you are tuning
    > > | every 5 minutes for a bit.
    > > |
    > > | Bike cable are not very different. The first shifts in a cables life stretches it more than at
    > > | any point in it's life. If the cables were installed, and given only a few shifts, the cables
    > > | were never
    stretched
    > > | initially. (as I find is the case in most LBS builds)
    > > |
    > > | One simple test ride in enough to put rear shifting out of wack.
    > > |
    > > | darsh
    > > |
    > > Darsh your comments got me wondering for a minute there as I always
    thought
    > > cables stretched over time. So I done some searching, reading and noting
    and
    > > found........they do stretch over time. I cant find any references to
    back
    > > up that cables stretch immediately "only".
    > >
    > > I have found through personal experience that prestretched cables do
    stretch
    > > slightly upon first installation and then remain constant, was it this
    you
    > > were referring to?
    > >
    > > Would be interested to know which it is.
    >
    > I think Darsh's point was that normal cables /start/ stretching immediately. Usually, after a few
    > weeks of moderate use, a cable will have stretched to its limit.

    More or less, that is certainly what I meant.

    Thanks!

    darsh
     
  9. Tbf

    Tbf Guest

    U da man!

    that's the best explanation I have heard yet, LOL

    "Darsh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Simon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Darsh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]... <snip>
    > >
    > > | > Cable stretch, then returning while you are riding the bike. BS!
    Cable
    > > | > stretch occurs, but somewhat slowly over the first few
    > days/weeks/months
    > > | > (depends on how much you ride) of the life of new cables.
    > > |
    > > | Cable stretch happens IMMEDIATELY. It is not unlike a guitar string.
    > > When
    > > | initially installed, I like to give it an immediate heavy stretch, otherwise, you are tuning
    > > | every 5 minutes for a bit.
    > > |
    > > | Bike cable are not very different. The first shifts in a cables life stretches it more than at
    > > | any point in it's usable life. If the
    cables
    > were
    > > | installed, and given only a few shifts, the cables were never
    stretched
    > > | initially. (as I find is the case in most LBS builds)
    > > |
    > > | One simple test ride in enough to put rear shifting out of wack.
    > > |
    > > | darsh
    > > |
    > > Darsh your comments got me wondering for a minute there as I always
    > thought
    > > cables stretched over time. So I done some searching, reading and noting
    > and
    > > found........they do stretch over time. I cant find any references to
    back
    > > up that cables stretch immediately "only".
    >
    > They do stretch over time. Don't know why you put 'only' in quotes. I never said only, but I
    > understand your interpretation of what I wrote.
    >
    > Of course all through the life of a wound cable, it will stretch. It is obvious that most of this
    > stretching happens when the cable is new. The stretching of the cable is not consistent throughout
    > it's life though.
    >
    > >
    > > I have found through personal experience that prestretched cables do
    > stretch
    > > slightly upon first installation and then remain constant, was it this
    you
    > > were referring to?
    >
    > Prestretched or not, the stretching will occur on initial use, and taper
    off
    > as the steel settles in to it's prime elasticity point. Being one of the most elastic substances
    > on the planet, steel naturally finds it's point of elasticity and holds it for quite some time. It
    > does not hold it forever, and eventually begins to stretch itself to death.
    >
    > Take a new rubber band and measure it's circumference. Stretch it nice
    and
    > tight and release. You will notice the rubber band has a larger circumference than it did before
    > the test. It did not retain a lot of
    it's
    > original elasticity. Now stretch the rubber band again. Now note the change in circumference. The
    > circumference is larger, but the change is
    not
    > as considerable as the first test pull.
    >
    > This will continue until the rubberband breaks. Sure the rubber looses
    some
    > of the elasticity as you test it over and over, but the difference should start to look like a
    > common logarithmic graph.
    >
    > The cable or rubberband will never remain constant, it will always stretch when stressed, but the
    > original lose of elasticity is never matched
    through
    > the life of the cable. The life of the cable is determined by it's
    ability
    > to hold it's elastic properties, or when it breaks, whatever happens
    first.
    > >
    > > Would be interested to know which it is.
    >
    > Don't know if this clarifies something. I am no professor. I only have experience and opinion to
    > base my findings upon.
    >
    > I install a new cable and ride about 50 feet down the road shifting like mad, stressing the cable.
    > It does not take much to stretch the perfectly adjusted, pre-stretched cable to the point of out
    > of adjustment shifting.
    >
    > Sometimes I repeat the shifting procedure twice. I then adjust, and the shifting stays where I
    > want it.
    >
    > Taking a bike off the rack, riding it on a test and experiencing shifting problems, seems to me a
    > very common experience.
    >
    > "So, how did you like it?"
    >
    > "Well if felt OK, but it didn't shift very well."
    >
    > "Yea, that is just cable stretch, it happens with new cables. We'll set
    you
    > up with a free 30-day tune-up to correct that after the cables settle in."
    >
    > What bike mechanic/salesman has not had a similar conversation?
    >
    > darsh
    >
    > >
    > > Simon.
    > >
    >
     
  10. Simon

    Simon Guest

  11. Darsh

    Darsh Guest

    "Simon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Darsh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > |
    > <snip awesome explanation>
    >
    > Thanks darsh clarified the whole thing there. This helped too:
    > http://www7.thomasregister.com/olc/wireropeassemblies/spec2.htm
    >
    > Guess I just had my learning head on today and wanted to get things
    correct
    > and not half arsed.
    >
    > Simon... The steeper the learning curve the more enjoyable the ride!

    Thanks you two, thought I might get lambasted for my unscientific explanation!

    darsh
     
  12. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Darsh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:%[email protected]...
    >
    > "Simon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Darsh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > |
    > > <snip awesome explanation>
    > >
    > > Thanks darsh clarified the whole thing there. This helped too:
    > > http://www7.thomasregister.com/olc/wireropeassemblies/spec2.htm
    > >
    > > Guess I just had my learning head on today and wanted to get things
    > correct
    > > and not half arsed.
    > >
    > > Simon... The steeper the learning curve the more enjoyable the ride!
    >
    > Thanks you two, thought I might get lambasted for my unscientific explanation!
    >
    > darsh
    >

    Even a blind squirrel finds a nut once in a while. ;^)

    Mike
     
  13. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "flyingcowbells" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I've just test rode a Giant NRS1, really liked it... Except the rear deraileur kept on shifting
    > gears in the medium to low gear when I applied a good amount of torque when going up hill.
    > (although the folks at LBS says it's probably the cable stretching when new. I also test rode a
    > Specialized Epic. More expensive but I didn't really like the feel of it. Although I must say I
    > tested it in the urban environment but did jump a few stacks of stairs and other more interesting
    > obstacles. on that day I also tried an NRS2. Didn't liked it at all (should I say cable disk
    > brakes sucks :p).
    >
    > Anyhow, I plan to get the NRS1, any of you folks have any comments?
    >
    > Ta!
    >
    > Bill.

    I've got an '03 NRS2. And you're right - cable mechs suck. But I must admit that I've managed to get
    mine working pretty sweet right at the moment. Then again, I haven't spent nearly as much time using
    hydralic brakes so I'm not 100% sure if I'm comparing them fairly. Price, and bang for buck, is the
    big factor, of course. I've recently considered upgrading to Hopes or Hayes but a quick enquiry to
    LBS told me that budget would be a factor for me! <laugh>

    The bike itself? What can I say? I love it and recommend it. Suspension works as advertised. I do
    get a tiny amount of bob when climbing sometimes if I hit just the right gear/cadence combination
    and get a little harmonic going. Otherwise it's very good and handles my 195 pounds nicely. Build
    quality is good. All the pieces are in the correct places (which is important). And after the first
    few months maintenance has been very low and all is holding together well.

    I'm inclined to put the NRS firmly in the XC category. Sure, it can take the knocks but other
    bikes have more travel and are designed to to take harder hits. I wonder if your urban riding
    and stair-jumping might not require something a little more robust and with a bit more
    suspension travel?

    Anyway, get the NRS1 if you can afford it. I would.

    Westie
     
  14. Thanks for your responses all of you. I went to the LBS again and placed a deposit. I was going
    to buy and take home except lol, I left my credit card at home! Is this an omen or what? Now
    I'm thinking should I get the Epic instead??? But tis like US$450 more. Is it more specced up
    than the NRS1?

    Ahhh, buyers remorse, I can feel it already!

    Bill.
    > > Bill.
    >
    > IIRC, there was a problem with the NRS ghost shifting because of where the cable stops are on the
    > rear triangle. It is slightly pulling on the rear mech as it moved through it's travel. The fix
    > was to bypass these by running a continuous length of housing from the last stop on the top tube
    > to the rear derailleur. The SRAM ESP 1:1 actuation ratio is more immune to this effect because it
    > requires twice the cable pull than Shimano to shift gears.
    >
    > HTH
    >
    > Mike
     
  15. Westie

    Westie Guest

    "flyingcowbells" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Thanks for your responses all of you. I went to the LBS again and placed a deposit. I was going
    > to buy and take home except lol, I left my credit card at home! Is this an omen or what? Now I'm
    > thinking should I get the Epic instead??? But tis like US$450 more. Is it more specced up than
    > the NRS1?
    >
    > Ahhh, buyers remorse, I can feel it already!
    >

    "Cognitive dissonance" I seem to recall it being called. You'll feel great getting the Epic, but in
    the end it's all about cost versus benefit. Isn't it? I could have gone out and mortgaged myself to
    the hilt and got myself an Epic too. But I probably ride no better and no worse and no less and no
    more because I got my NRS2. Sometimes I wonder "What if..." for sure. Buy what you can afford and
    feel good about. I know that I have an awesome time on mine. Sit down and watch some TV and even
    sleep on it. Ask yourself "Can I really afford this?" and " If I spend another $500 will I kick
    myself in six months time for NOT spending it?" IMHO, if you bike alot, stretch yourself a bit. Just
    don't stretch yourself alot and get yourself in financial strife and find yourself hating the bike
    because of the money that was spent on it.

    Westie

    PS You can ALWAYS find a bike more specc'd up for more money. That's what this game is all about.
    That's what differentiates so many frames.
     
  16. >I wonder if your urban riding and stair-jumping might not require something a little more robust
    >and with a bit more suspension travel?
    >
    Do you have any other recommendations? I'm not very familar with the current state of things since
    the last mtn bike I got is in
    1985/86'!!! Are you suggesting that I should get a freestyle bike? I just found out that I can
    wheelie on my old bike. (Guess ole dogs can still learn new tricks :D ) I'd like to try out
    more tricks which is also useful on the trail like hops and stuffs...
     
  17. Flyingcoyote

    Flyingcoyote Guest

    "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    | I'm inclined to put the NRS firmly in the XC category. Sure, it can take the knocks but other
    | bikes have more travel and are designed to to take harder hits. I wonder if your urban riding
    | and stair-jumping might not require something a little more robust and with a bit more
    | suspension travel?
    |

    I've a 2002 NRS Air and although it's obviously built as a XC racing bike I've taken it through some
    pretty hard hits. Mine's handled 6' drops with no problems (I usually weigh about 180) as long as
    the sus is dialed in for it, same with flights of stairs. It's a sturdy bike and after two friends
    saw what I put mine through they decided to get themselves one as well. So far everyone is happy
    with the choice.

    The NRS Air I've got has mostly stock components. (RC SID sus, f/r. XTR comps. Etc.)

    --
    FlyingCoyote http://www.boarsgut.com
    --
     
  18. Flyingcoyote

    Flyingcoyote Guest

    "flyingcowbells" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | Hi all,
    |
    | I've just test rode a Giant NRS1, really liked it... Except the rear deraileur kept on shifting
    | gears in the medium to low gear when I applied a good amount of torque when going up hill.
    | (although the folks at LBS says it's probably the cable stretching when new. I also test rode a
    | Specialized Epic. More expensive but I didn't really like the feel of it. Although I must say I
    | tested it in the urban environment but did jump a few stacks of stairs and other more interesting
    | obstacles. on that day I also tried an NRS2. Didn't liked it at all (should I say cable disk
    | brakes sucks :p).
    |
    | Anyhow, I plan to get the NRS1, any of you folks have any comments?
    |
    | Ta!
    |
    | Bill.

    Some Giant NRS's (2002's mostly?) have had a problem with ghost shifting due to flex in the
    seatstay. I've had no problems with mine at all.

    Check out http://www.angryasian.com/main.cfm and scroll towards the bottom for "Nov. 7, 2002 8:24:41
    AM Attn: all Giant NRS owners!!!"

    If the bike is new, there shouldn't be much cable stretch yet and of there is, I'd think the shop
    would make the appropriate adjustments if they really planned on trying to sell it. It's bad
    practice to let someone test ride a bike that doesn't work properly.

    --
    FlyingCoyote http://www.boarsgut.com
    --
     
  19. FlyingCoyote wrote:
    >
    > "Westie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > | I'm inclined to put the NRS firmly in the XC category. Sure, it can take the knocks but other
    > | bikes have more travel and are designed to to take harder hits. I wonder if your urban riding
    > | and stair-jumping might not require something a little more robust and with a bit more
    > | suspension travel?
    > |
    >
    > I've a 2002 NRS Air and although it's obviously built as a XC racing bike I've taken it through
    > some pretty hard hits. Mine's handled 6' drops with no problems (I usually weigh about 180) as
    > long as the sus is dialed in for it, same with flights of stairs. It's a sturdy bike and after two
    > friends saw what I put mine through they decided to get themselves one as well. So far everyone is
    > happy with the choice.
    >
    > The NRS Air I've got has mostly stock components. (RC SID sus, f/r. XTR comps. Etc.)
    >

    One of my riding buddies has had great fun with his, including some 4-6 foot drops. He's
    6'6" 250! <G>

    I've got a VT1 on order!

    Barry
     
  20. Flyingcoyote

    Flyingcoyote Guest

    "B a r r y B u r k e J r ." <"keep it in the newsgroup "@thankyou.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | One of my riding buddies has had great fun with his, including some 4-6 foot drops. He's 6'6"
    | 250! <G>
    |
    | I've got a VT1 on order!
    |
    | Barry

    Holy moly. Ok, so despite my praise of the Giant NRS I think I would really have to think hard about
    taking a 6' if I were 6'6" and 250lbs! At least with the stock SIDS mine came with.

    Eesh.

    What suspension is he using?

    --
    FlyingCoyote http://www.boarsgut.com
    --
     
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