Giant OCR 3 for a beginner



lokstah

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Sep 30, 2003
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Originally posted by Kez Deale
Will the OCR 3 be good for what I want to do.. which is touring, and racing, on a moderate basis (max I'll most likey ride is about 150KM a week)... and I've never ridden a road bike before.... so.... yeah.... hmm... later on... can I replace the parts on the bike?? Like, get a new fork later on, and gear systems and cranks and all that??? Later on down the track?
Fork and drivetrain upgrades are do-able, but probably not economical. You'd more or less have to replace the entire drivetrain, for instance, because the Sora system is pretty much incompatible with every succesive generation of shifters and gears. A new fork wouldn't be too hard to get a hold of, but after making a drivetrain upgrade, you've essentially paid the value of an OCR3 all over again.

An OCR3 would be fun and useable -- it's simply not spec'd for anything more than casual recreational use, is all. I think you can spend the same or just a pinch more a get a bike that you'll be sincerely pleased with for miles, miles, miles, more.
 

Kez Deale

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Jan 15, 2004
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Originally posted by lokstah
Ok, ok, calm down...

The '04 OCR3, first of all, shares a Sora drivetrain (with a low-end TruVativ crank and Tektro brakes tossed in) and non-carbon fork with the '03 model. The steerer tube has been upgraded to a 1 1/8". which is a plus, and I think that weird adjustable stem it comes with is threadless (though it's hard to be sure at this tech level). Anyone know for sure?

Still, I think the caveats apply. Almost any road bike is better than no road bike, so if you're really determined to buy a new ride in this price range, by all means, go for it.

I'm just positive, though, that you can sniff around your local shops and find something (maybe a new '02 or '03 model, reduced) with a carbon fork and a better drivetrain, for the same wad of cash -- well worth it in my opinion.

Particularly, Kez, if you're thinking of putting any real miles on this thing... which heavy touring and racing will do. You'll encounter the limitations of those corner-cutting options faster and harder if you're putting the bike to serious use.

I'm not a certified mechanic or qualified salesperson, but I wouldn't recommend a Sora-based road bike with an aluminum fork to anyone thinking of putting more than 50 or 60 miles monthly on the thing.

Good luck with whatever you decide!

Oh... :p... hm... sorta lost for words.... well... I'll look at getting an older model, with the better parts, for the same price tag..... if I cant... then you reccomend the OCR 2 i take it.... but... I still wish to know if I can upgrade the parts later on???
 

Kez Deale

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Jan 15, 2004
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Originally posted by lokstah
(see 1 previous post... good luck!)

Oops.... sorry mate :D

Well, I'll talk to the bike shop about it...

IF I can get the Fork Upgrade, and the drive train for half the price of the bike later on... as in.. a few months or so, then I'll get the OCR 3, as I have to pay $1500 in Australia to get the OCR 2... that's all... and I am very, very strapped for cash....

But, with the OCR 2... they're strapless pedals right? Dont I have to buy a pair of shoes to go with the bike?
 

lokstah

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Sep 30, 2003
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Originally posted by Kez Deale
Oops.... sorry mate :D

Well, I'll talk to the bike shop about it...

IF I can get the Fork Upgrade, and the drive train for half the price of the bike later on... as in.. a few months or so, then I'll get the OCR 3, as I have to pay $1500 in Australia to get the OCR 2... that's all... and I am very, very strapped for cash....

But, with the OCR 2... they're strapless pedals right? Dont I have to buy a pair of shoes to go with the bike?
Good luck with your hunt. I didn't mean to splash cold water all over you effort -- I just think there are a few things to look out for.

The OCR2 does come with a set of basic Shimano-SPD clipless pedals, which would require shoes eventually, but a few things to consider in that department:

1) You can pop them off with a wrench and put on a pair of $10 platform pedals with toe-straps in about five minutes.

2) When you do have the budget/motivation to try going clipless, you'll thank yourself. Once you do, it's hard to imagine pedaling agressively (as in a race) without them. You're a safer, faster, more confident cyclist once you get past the learning curve.

Cheers!
 

Kez Deale

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Jan 15, 2004
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alrightey....

I'm getting the OCR 2.... hahahh

It just seems better I guess.. and it's only an extra.... $450 AU for me... so... yeah
 

Kevin in KY

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Sep 21, 2003
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Great thread guys...I'm in the same boat. Looks like the 2004 OCR2 for me. Too many upgrades from the 2003 models...even my LBS was impressed as he showed it to me last fall. We can get them here for $720-$750. Good luck and enjoy!
 

Kez Deale

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Jan 15, 2004
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Well I'm definately getting it now...

Clipless... well.... so they do require shoes...

Do they require cleats to go with it???
 

lokstah

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Sep 30, 2003
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Cleats and pedals are a single system, and sold that way.

The only trick is making sure your shoes of choice are compatible with the pedal system you've selected. The configuration of bolt-holes, as well as the shape of the sole, make some shoes an improper fit for some cleats -- luckily, though, it's harder and harder to find incompatible systems. Most manufacturers adhere to the same basic standards.

When you get to that point, a quick browse of the shoe or pedal makers' websites, or even a quick inquiry here, can put your mind at ease. Like I said, though, if you're strapped for cash, you can spend $8 on a pair of standard platform pedals for the first month or two.
 

Kez Deale

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Jan 15, 2004
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Originally posted by lokstah
Cleats and pedals are a single system, and sold that way.

The only trick is making sure your shoes of choice are compatible with the pedal system you've selected. The configuration of bolt-holes, as well as the shape of the sole, make some shoes an improper fit for some cleats -- luckily, though, it's harder and harder to find incompatible systems. Most manufacturers adhere to the same basic standards.

When you get to that point, a quick browse of the shoe or pedal makers' websites, or even a quick inquiry here, can put your mind at ease. Like I said, though, if you're strapped for cash, you can spend $8 on a pair of standard platform pedals for the first month or two.

Hmm.... yeah I'll try the platforms for a while untill I get some more cash...
 

Kez Deale

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Jan 15, 2004
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eee

Just found out.... Cleats come with the pedals :)... so I'll just get a pair of cheap (but comfy) shoes...

Kez