Giant Revive?



Dear All:
Hi! For the first time today, I saw someone not test-riding on a
Giant Revive. As he rode past on the sidealk I couldn't help thinking
"Get into the street and up the cadance!" It didn't look quite nice for
a tour (we've got a lot of Easy Racers around here) but as a runabout
town errand runner, it looks OK.

Robert Leone [email protected]
 
K

Ken C. M.

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Dear All:
> Hi! For the first time today, I saw someone not test-riding on a
> Giant Revive. As he rode past on the sidealk I couldn't help thinking
> "Get into the street and up the cadance!" It didn't look quite nice for
> a tour (we've got a lot of Easy Racers around here) but as a runabout
> town errand runner, it looks OK.
>
> Robert Leone [email protected]
>


I think your right. If I remember right it's on the HEAVY side for a
bent, plus it's ugly to boot. In my opinion anyway.

Ken
--
The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it gets
old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one without
shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong
 
R

Roger Zoul

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
:: Dear All:
:: Hi! For the first time today, I saw someone not test-riding on a
:: Giant Revive. As he rode past on the sidealk I couldn't help thinking
:: "Get into the street and up the cadance!" It didn't look quite nice
:: for a tour (we've got a lot of Easy Racers around here) but as a
:: runabout town errand runner, it looks OK.

I test rode one of these before buying my road bike back in 2003. Frankly,
I think the intended use for these are for elderly who just want to have
some fun riding the neighborhoods while getting some exericse. I just can't
see it (or me on it) for any tour - unless you consider 15 miles a tour.
OTOH, a guy at the LBS used to weigh 270 lbs and has dropped down to 210 lbs
using one of these. He's quite young (has kids) and looks great (even if
still overweight - he's a fairly solid guy).
 
Dear Ken:
Yeah -- it's aesthetic appearance wasn't slick, tubish, or ready for a
fairing. Definitely not a "beautiful" RANS or Easy RIder. On the other
hand, one of the locals in my riding group likes his BikeE-- now that's
an ugly LOOKING mahcine with that big box beam running from front to
back.

Robert Leone
Ken C. M. wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
> > Dear All:
> > Hi! For the first time today, I saw someone not test-riding on a
> > Giant Revive. As he rode past on the sidealk I couldn't help thinking
> > "Get into the street and up the cadance!" It didn't look quite nice for
> > a tour (we've got a lot of Easy Racers around here) but as a runabout
> > town errand runner, it looks OK.
> >
> > Robert Leone [email protected]
> >

>
> I think your right. If I remember right it's on the HEAVY side for a
> bent, plus it's ugly to boot. In my opinion anyway.
>
> Ken
> --
> The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it gets
> old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one without
> shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong
 
D

DougC

Guest
Roger Zoul wrote:
>
> I test rode one of these before buying my road bike back in 2003. Frankly,
> I think the intended use for these are for elderly who just want to have
> some fun riding the neighborhoods while getting some exericse. I just can't
> see it (or me on it) for any tour - unless you consider 15 miles a tour.
> OTOH, a guy at the LBS used to weigh 270 lbs and has dropped down to 210 lbs
> using one of these. He's quite young (has kids) and looks great (even if
> still overweight - he's a fairly solid guy).
>
>
>

The Revive is available as an electric-motorized version. It has been
said that it makes a better electric bike than pedal-powered bike.

The Revives aren't as good for long-distance riding as a "real" bent
because their position isn't very efficient for pedaling--but they have
three things going for them: they /are/ somewhat more comfortable to
ride than a typical upright bike, and they don't cost very much (~$350 I
recall for the non-electric version, much less than any new recumbent).
The third thing is that they have a large network of dealers who will
keep them on hand, so people will SEE them in the bike shop window.

After I got rid of my last upright bike (about four years back) I didn't
expect that I'd be buying ANY more uprights, none interested me. Until
the RANS crank-forwards came out, and I bought a Fusion, and love it.
I've had a lot of people ride it and most did say they liked it--but for
most of them, their eyes popped out when I told them it cost $900.
~
 
K

Ken C. M.

Guest
DougC wrote:

> when I told them it cost $900.


Ah yes and this is what keeps many that like the way 'bents ride from
buying them. It's really too bad that more builders don't make an
econo-recumbent.

Ken
--
The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it gets
old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one without
shocking the entire community. ~Ann Strong
 
J

Johnny Sunset aka Tom Sherman

Guest
DougC wrote:
> ...
> The Revives aren't as good for long-distance riding as a "real" bent
> because their position isn't very efficient for pedaling--but they have
> three things going for them: they /are/ somewhat more comfortable to
> ride than a typical upright bike, and they don't cost very much (~$350 I
> recall for the non-electric version, much less than any new recumbent).
> The third thing is that they have a large network of dealers who will
> keep them on hand, so people will SEE them in the bike shop window....


Number 4 - on a crank forward (CF) or semi-recumbent bicycle such as
the Revive, the rider can put his/her feet on the ground while seated.
While this may not seem like much of an advantage to most experienced
cyclists, I see too many newbie's riding bicycles with the saddle
almost resting on the top tube so they can get their feet down (the
very thought of which makes my knees hurt). Anything that gets more
people on bikes is a good thing.

--
Tom Sherman - Post Free or Die!