Giant Revive

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Seth Jayson, Mar 21, 2003.

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  1. Seth Jayson

    Seth Jayson Guest

    Road one of these at the Chicago bike show. (Yes, I know it's not a real recumbent.)

    (Giant Revive --
    http://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/030.000.000/030.000.000.asp?bikesection=8828&lYear=2003 )

    But, it felt pretty comfy, handled nicely, and was WAY easy to set-up (adjust seat position, handle
    bars, etc.) I would have to agree that they may have come up with something along the lines of an
    ultimate comfort bike.

    Reportedly going for around $700? Seems fair to me. Heavy though, 37 pounds. A good bike to
    recommend to folks who just wanna cruise around. And since it looks goofier than most of our 'bents,
    maybe it'll draw some of the flack from the roadies.

    Sj
     
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  2. I rode one around a parking lot today. I thought it was very nice. I think that the seat needs to be
    tilted up quite a bit.

    I am spoiled by my M5 seat and head rest. If your back isn't wrecked, the Revive is worth a look.
    --
    Bill "Pop Pop" Patterson Retired and riding my Linear, my front drive low racer and our M5 tandem.

    See some Bikes At:

    http://home.earthlink.net/~wm.patterson/index.html

    PC

    http://www.roadkillbill.com/r135.html

    Class and Helicopter

    http://www.calpoly.edu/~wpatters/

    Reply to [email protected]
     
  3. nobody

    nobody Guest

    On Sat, 22 Mar 2003 04:12:42 GMT, Bill Patterson <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I rode one around a parking lot today. I thought it was very nice. I think that the seat needs to
    >be tilted up quite a bit.
    >
    >I am spoiled by my M5 seat and head rest. If your back isn't wrecked, the Revive is worth a look.

    I took a Revive for a test-spin a couple of days ago. I really like the upright yet relaxed position
    it offers. I also just love the bike's cool styling. While test-riding it, I found myself getting
    lots of oohs and ahhs and attention from people on the street - in other words, the reception was
    overwhelmingly positive.

    I do have a few doubts: The handling seems a bit twitchy - does this have something to do with the
    Revive's small tires and semi-recumbent design?

    I also found my legs got really sore after powering up a small hill - this is probably due to not
    having ridden any kind of bike for a long time and also not having developed the muscle groups that
    bent riders are supposed to - or is it?

    On balance I liked the bike more than disliked it. I wish the Revive had a bigger, cushier seat like
    the BikeE does - the stock seat is a tad harder than I would like. Interestingly, the sales girl in
    the bike shop told me that Giant manufactured bikes for BikeE. When BikeE went bankrupt, Giant took
    what they learned from making BikeE's and invested the knowledge in the Revive.

    The bike is certainly more comfortable than my LandGear diamond-frame hybrid, a bike I bought three
    years ago and gave up riding because my 40 year-old bones and knees can't hack riding around on a
    conventional DF type bike anymore.

    I'd love to buy something like a HP Velotechnik or a Cannondale, but these are way out of my price
    range. I figure if the Revive isn't the bike for me, then I'll have to try homebuilding a recumbent
    - even though I have no welding tools and no training in welding!

    Steve
     
  4. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    [email protected] wrote: [...]
    > I'd love to buy something like a HP Velotechnik or a Cannondale, but these are way out of my price
    > range. I figure if the Revive isn't the bike for me, then I'll have to try homebuilding a
    > recumbent - even though I have no welding tools and no training in welding!
    [...]

    The Rans Fusion might be in the same price range as the Revive, and it does have a large seat.
    Also consider the EZ-1 bikes from Easy Racers/J&B. I think I recently saw used on on the net
    somewhere for $350.

    John Riley
     
  5. Jim H

    Jim H Guest

    I tried a Vision Thoroughbred yesterday. Similar geometry, but a simple, conventional-looking
    design. Extremely comfortable, shock-mounted seat. I'm going to get one for my wife - she's not much
    of a rider and liked the feeling of being able to hit the brakes and put her feet on the ground at
    any time, without being pitched forward. If I were peddling short hops around an urban core, college
    campus etc I think I'd ride something like this.
     
  6. nobody

    nobody Guest

    On Sat, 22 Mar 2003 11:01:30 GMT, John Riley <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >
    >[email protected] wrote: [...]
    >> I'd love to buy something like a HP Velotechnik or a Cannondale, but these are way out of my
    >> price range. I figure if the Revive isn't the bike for me, then I'll have to try homebuilding a
    >> recumbent - even though I have no welding tools and no training in welding!
    >[...]
    >
    >The Rans Fusion might be in the same price range as the Revive, and it does have a large seat. Also
    >consider the EZ-1 bikes from Easy Racers/J&B. I think I recently saw used on on the net somewhere
    >for $350.

    I went to Toronto today to check out the only bike shop (that I know of, anyway) in my part of
    Ontario that sells recumbent bikes and trikes.

    They had an Easy Racers EZ-1 Super Cruzer available for test-ride as well as the trike version of
    the same bike. There was also a HP Velotechnik, an Optima Hopper as well as a Ligfietsen M5 City
    Mate folding recumbent.

    Surprisingly, the Velotechnik was a mixed bag. It handled well, but the high angle of the crank left
    me feeling kind of scrunched up, even with the seat set back a little bit, and the seat felt
    reclined too far back for my taste.

    The M5 was nicer still, but my legs felt a bit hyper-extended, such that the bottoms of my feet were
    hurting slightly with each crank of the pedals.

    The best of the bunch, for my purposes anyway, was the EZ-1. The gel seat seemed to do as well
    damping bumps as the suspension on the Velotechnik did. The EZ-1 was definitely superior to the
    Giant Revive in terms of comfort and ease of use. Where I had to fiddle quite a bit with the Revive
    to get sort-of- comfortable, I found I took to the EZ-1 fairly quickly and naturally. Interestingly,
    I found myself riding faster on the EZ-1 than with any of the other bikes.

    When comparing the Revive and the EZ-1, I have to say that I concur with someone else who posted to
    this newsgroup saying that the Revive seems to offer the worst attributes of both conventional
    diamond-frame bikes and recumbents. On the other hand, the Revive is one cool looking bike while the
    EZ-1 is $200.00 cheaper.

    There was one thing I found disconcerting about all of the recumbents, particularly the EZ-1 - the
    relatively long wheelbase and small tires conspire to make the handling a bit twitchy and handling
    tight turns a bit ponderous. Maybe I'm just not used to the way recumbents handle and so notice the
    handling characteristics more.

    Finally, the EZ-1 trike was interesting. It was initially hard getting started with it - it seemed
    like it wouldn't go where I pointed it, and wobbled a bit. I finally figured the handling out and
    was on my way. The trike is slower than its two-wheeled counterpart, and the wobbling does become
    noticeable if you try to go fast.

    Now if f I can just sell my LandGear 21-speed diamond frame bike for a half-decent price. I bought
    it new in the summer of 2000 and rode it twice. My middle-aged body and knees just can't hack the
    demands a DF imposes anymore!

    Steve
     
  7. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > ... Surprisingly, the Velotechnik was a mixed bag....

    Spirit, Wavey, Street Machine GT, or Speedmachine? (I would guess the Spirit is the bike being
    discussed.)

    > ... The best of the bunch, for my purposes anyway, was the EZ-1. The gel seat seemed to do as well
    > damping bumps as the suspension on the Velotechnik did. The EZ-1 was definitely superior to the
    > Giant Revive in terms of comfort and ease of use. Where I had to fiddle quite a bit with the
    > Revive to get sort-of- comfortable, I found I took to the EZ-1 fairly quickly and naturally.
    > Interestingly, I found myself riding faster on the EZ-1 than with any of the other bikes....

    > There was one thing I found disconcerting about all of the recumbents, particularly the EZ-1 - the
    > relatively long wheelbase and small tires conspire to make the handling a bit twitchy and handling
    > tight turns a bit ponderous. Maybe I'm just not used to the way recumbents handle and so notice
    > the handling characteristics more....

    Steve,

    There is nothing wrong with the EZ-1 SC, especially when its price is taken into consideration.
    While it is not a performance bike, it works very well for its intended uses.

    Upright bicycle riders are used to supporting a significant portion of their body weight with their
    arms. Often they have problems riding recumbents at first since they apply too much force to the
    handlebars and/or pull on the bars - either action will to over-controlling the bike.

    My suggestion is to hold the handgrips with just the thumb and forefinger until one becomes used to
    the lighter control forces required on a recumbent bicycle compared to an upright.

    Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  8. Jay

    Jay Guest

    > I went to Toronto today to check out the only bike shop (that I know of, anyway) in my part of
    > Ontario that sells recumbent bikes and trikes.<snip>

    If you say which shop you went to- area people can direct you to more stores. I know of at least
    three Toronto shops that have bents as well as more shops in southern Ontario. I am also aware of
    various owners who are very easygoing about trying their bikes/trikes.
     
  9. Edward Wong

    Edward Wong Guest

    > On balance I liked the bike more than disliked it. I wish the Revive had a bigger, cushier seat
    > like the BikeE does - the stock seat is a tad harder than I would like.

    I seen the biggest, cushiest cruiser type seat at a local bike shop the other day which would
    probably work on this bike. I kid you not, it's almost as big as the seat bottom off a RANS. I
    believe it sells for $50. Just a thought to anyone who purchases a Revive and wants a more
    comfortable seat.

    Edward Wong Orlando, FL
     
  10. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    Jay wrote:
    >
    > > I went to Toronto today to check out the only bike shop (that I know of, anyway) in my part of
    > > Ontario that sells recumbent bikes and trikes.<snip>
    >
    > If you say which shop you went to- area people can direct you to more stores. I know of at least
    > three Toronto shops that have bents as well as more shops in southern Ontario. I am also aware of
    > various owners who are very easygoing about trying their bikes/trikes.

    Sounds like he went to Urbane Cyclist downtown. There is also Bicycle Spokesman in Richmond Hill.
    But for the price, the EZ-1 is hard to beat.

    John Riley
     
  11. Jay

    Jay Guest

    in article [email protected], John Riley at [email protected] wrote on
    3/23/03 7:00 AM:

    >
    >
    > Jay wrote:
    >>
    >>> I went to Toronto today to check out the only bike shop (that I know of, anyway) in my part of
    >>> Ontario that sells recumbent bikes and trikes.<snip>
    >>
    >> If you say which shop you went to- area people can direct you to more stores. I know of at least
    >> three Toronto shops that have bents as well as more shops in southern Ontario. I am also aware of
    >> various owners who are very easygoing about trying their bikes/trikes.
    >
    > Sounds like he went to Urbane Cyclist downtown. There is also Bicycle Spokesman in Richmond Hill.
    > But for the price, the EZ-1 is hard to beat.

    I was also thinking of Triketrails, which had at least four bent trikes last time I spoke to them.
     
  12. > Steve,
    >
    > There is nothing wrong with the EZ-1 SC, especially when its price is taken into consideration.
    > While it is not a performance bike, it works very well for its intended uses.
    >
    > Upright bicycle riders are used to supporting a significant portion of their body weight with
    > their arms. Often they have problems riding recumbents at first since they apply too much force to
    > the handlebars and/or pull on the bars - either action will to over-controlling the bike.
    >
    > My suggestion is to hold the handgrips with just the thumb and forefinger until one becomes used
    > to the lighter control forces required on a recumbent bicycle compared to an upright.
    >
    > Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)

    I just finished the 7 day bike florida tour with my EZ-1 SC and was very pleased with the handling
    and agree with keeping a light touch on the grips. When one factors in the reasonable cost of the
    EZ-1 it definately is a winner. I am new to bents with only 800 miles on this bike and this first
    tour was made possible because i am now riding a bent.

    peter m spirito
     
  13. nobody

    nobody Guest

    On Sun, 23 Mar 2003 09:54:39 -0500, Jay <[email protected]> wrote:

    >in article [email protected], John Riley at [email protected] wrote on
    >3/23/03 7:00 AM:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> Jay wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I went to Toronto today to check out the only bike shop (that I know of, anyway) in my part of
    >>>> Ontario that sells recumbent bikes and trikes.<snip>
    >>>
    >>> If you say which shop you went to- area people can direct you to more stores. I know of at least
    >>> three Toronto shops that have bents as well as more shops in southern Ontario. I am also aware
    >>> of various owners who are very easygoing about trying their bikes/trikes.
    >>
    >> Sounds like he went to Urbane Cyclist downtown. There is also Bicycle Spokesman in Richmond Hill.
    >> But for the price, the EZ-1 is hard to beat.
    >
    >I was also thinking of Triketrails, which had at least four bent trikes last time I spoke to them.

    I went to Triketrails in Whitby, and yes, they did have at least four bent trikes of differing types
    available. It's a well-run shop run by nice people.

    I just have to sell my existing DF-type bike first, and I may well be paying them a visit!

    Steve
     
  14. Have U tried selling your DF on TBN?
    ------------------------------------
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 23 Mar 2003 09:54:39 -0500, Jay <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >in article [email protected], John Riley at
    [email protected]
    > >wrote on 3/23/03 7:00 AM:
    > >
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Jay wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>> I went to Toronto today to check out the only bike shop (that I know of, anyway) in my part
    > >>>> of Ontario that sells recumbent bikes and trikes.<snip>
    > >>>
    > >>> If you say which shop you went to- area people can direct you to more stores. I know of at
    > >>> least three Toronto shops that have bents as well as more
    shops
    > >>> in southern Ontario. I am also aware of various owners who are very easygoing about trying
    their
    > >>> bikes/trikes.
    > >>
    > >> Sounds like he went to Urbane Cyclist downtown. There is also Bicycle Spokesman in Richmond
    > >> Hill. But for the price, the EZ-1 is hard to
    beat.
    > >
    > >I was also thinking of Triketrails, which had at least four bent trikes
    last
    > >time I spoke to them.
    >
    > I went to Triketrails in Whitby, and yes, they did have at least four bent trikes of differing
    > types available. It's a well-run shop run by nice people.
    >
    > I just have to sell my existing DF-type bike first, and I may well be paying them a visit!
    >
    >
    > Steve
     
  15. falkirkeagle

    falkirkeagle Guest

    On Sun, 23 Mar 2003 20:06:32 -0500, "Joshua Goldberg" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Have U tried selling your DF on TBN?
    >------------------------------------

    Erm, what's "TBN"?

    Steve
     
  16. Toronto Bicycling Network TBN http://www.tbn.on.ca Free Classifieds for DFs and bents, go to TBN
    Message Boards and then Buy & Sell (about 420 bikes & components now listed)
    -------------------------------------------------
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 23 Mar 2003 20:06:32 -0500, "Joshua Goldberg" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Have U tried selling your DF on TBN?
    > >------------------------------------
    >
    > Erm, what's "TBN"?
    >
    >
    > Steve
     
  17. Jay

    Jay Guest

    >>>>> I went to Toronto today to check out the only bike shop (that I know of, anyway) in my part of
    >>>>> Ontario that sells recumbent bikes and trikes.<snip>
    >>>>
    >>>> If you say which shop you went to- area people can direct you to more stores. I know of at
    >>>> least three Toronto shops that have bents as well as more shops in southern Ontario. I am also
    >>>> aware of various owners who are very easygoing about trying their bikes/trikes.
    >>>
    >>> Sounds like he went to Urbane Cyclist downtown. There is also Bicycle Spokesman in Richmond
    >>> Hill. But for the price, the EZ-1 is hard to beat.
    >>
    >> I was also thinking of Triketrails, which had at least four bent trikes last time I spoke
    >> to them.
    >
    > I went to Triketrails in Whitby, and yes, they did have at least four bent trikes of differing
    > types available. It's a well-run shop run by nice people.
    >
    > I just have to sell my existing DF-type bike first, and I may well be paying them a visit!

    If you are patient and money is an issue you could buy used. Online sources are one option. For
    local used recumbents, Recumbent Cycling Ontario has a For Sale/Bents Wanted area
    http://www.hpv.on.ca/buyand.htm Or do as I have and have a "standing order" with local homebuilders
    and bike stores- " you have a used bent for sale- call me"

    One more option- there is a loosely organized group of homebuilders in the region. If you want
    contact info to join local lists or to get someone to help you build- let me know.
     
  18. Me

    Me Guest

    37 pounds?? my trike weighs less than that!

    On 21 Mar 2003 17:03:59 -0800, [email protected] (Seth Jayson) wrote:

    >Road one of these at the Chicago bike show. (Yes, I know it's not a real recumbent.)
    >
    >(Giant Revive --
    >http://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/030.000.000/030.000.000.asp?bikesection=8828&lYear=2003 )
    >
    >
    >But, it felt pretty comfy, handled nicely, and was WAY easy to set-up (adjust seat position, handle
    >bars, etc.) I would have to agree that they may have come up with something along the lines of an
    >ultimate comfort bike.
    >
    >Reportedly going for around $700? Seems fair to me. Heavy though, 37 pounds. A good bike to
    >recommend to folks who just wanna cruise around. And since it looks goofier than most of our
    >'bents, maybe it'll draw some of the flack from the roadies.
    >
    >Sj
     
  19. Dave Is Here

    Dave Is Here Guest

    Steve Nobody No matter what kind of bike you ride, whether it be DF or bent all your power has to go
    through your knees. I guess you know that. The best advice that I can give you on that issue is to
    not to press on the pedals so hard and run a couple of gears lower than you are currently using. You
    should be able to ride at 14 mph in your middle ring in a middle (18-21) cog. Dave

    [email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I took a Revive for a test-spin a couple of days ago. I really like the upright yet relaxed
    > position it offers. I also just love the bike's cool styling. While test-riding it, I found myself
    > getting lots of oohs and ahhs and attention from people on the street - in other words, the
    > reception was overwhelmingly positive.
    >
    > I do have a few doubts: The handling seems a bit twitchy - does this have something to do with the
    > Revive's small tires and semi-recumbent design?
    >
    > I also found my legs got really sore after powering up a small hill - this is probably due to not
    > having ridden any kind of bike for a long time and also not having developed the muscle groups
    > that bent riders are supposed to - or is it?
    >
    > On balance I liked the bike more than disliked it. I wish the Revive had a bigger, cushier seat
    > like the BikeE does - the stock seat is a tad harder than I would like. Interestingly, the sales
    > girl in the bike shop told me that Giant manufactured bikes for BikeE. When BikeE went bankrupt,
    > Giant took what they learned from making BikeE's and invested the knowledge in the Revive.
    >
    > The bike is certainly more comfortable than my LandGear diamond-frame hybrid, a bike I bought
    > three years ago and gave up riding because my 40 year-old bones and knees can't hack riding around
    > on a conventional DF type bike anymore.
    >
    > I'd love to buy something like a HP Velotechnik or a Cannondale, but these are way out of my price
    > range. I figure if the Revive isn't the bike for me, then I'll have to try homebuilding a
    > recumbent - even though I have no welding tools and no training in welding!
    >
    > Steve
     
  20. Edward Wong

    Edward Wong Guest

    > I took a Revive for a test-spin a couple of days ago. I really like the upright yet relaxed
    > position it offers. I also just love the bike's cool styling. While test-riding it, I found myself
    > getting lots of oohs and ahhs and attention from people on the street - in other words, the
    > reception was overwhelmingly positive.
    >
    > I do have a few doubts: The handling seems a bit twitchy - does this have something to do with the
    > Revive's small tires and semi-recumbent design?
    >
    > I also found my legs got really sore after powering up a small hill - this is probably due to not
    > having ridden any kind of bike for a long time and also not having developed the muscle groups
    > that bent riders are supposed to - or is it?
    >
    > On balance I liked the bike more than disliked it. I wish the Revive had a bigger, cushier seat
    > like the BikeE does - the stock seat is a tad harder than I would like. Interestingly, the sales
    > girl in the bike shop told me that Giant manufactured bikes for BikeE. When BikeE went bankrupt,
    > Giant took what they learned from making BikeE's and invested the knowledge in the Revive.

    Even though it's a bit more money, the Healthrider Scootie seems like another good alternative to
    consider. It is a 7 speed variant of the very highly regarded Scooterbike.

    http://www.iconfitness.com/cgi-bin/ncommerce3/ProductDisplay?prmenbr=979&prrfnbr=249169&cgrf-
    nbr=248271

    You may need to "re-assemble" the link onto your browser's address box if it's not entirely
    underlined.

    Edward Wong Orlando, FL
     
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