Glass and tire wiping



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S

Stubintner

Guest
I read with interest the thread on glass and tire wiping. Does anyone else still use tire
saver "wire wipes?" A few geezers that I know (and I) still do and find that they work very
well. Any comments?
 
D

David Ornee

Guest
"StuBintner" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I read with interest the thread on glass and tire wiping. Does anyone
else
> still use tire saver "wire wipes?" A few geezers that I know (and I) still
do
> and find that they work very well. Any comments?

I use them. They work well. I also use the area on my cycling gloves between the index finger and
thumb when I have been through what I think looks potentially puncture producing. I haven't been
able to implement a method for the tandem rear wheel in that regard yet. :>

David Ornee, Western Springs, IL
 
R

Raptor

Guest
David Ornee wrote:
> "StuBintner" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>
>>I read with interest the thread on glass and tire wiping. Does anyone
>
> else
>
>>still use tire saver "wire wipes?" A few geezers that I know (and I) still
>
> do
>
>>and find that they work very well. Any comments?
>
>
> I use them. They work well. I also use the area on my cycling gloves between the index finger and
> thumb when I have been through what I think looks potentially puncture producing. I haven't been
> able to implement a method for the tandem rear wheel in that regard yet. :>
>
> David Ornee, Western Springs, IL

If you ride on the brake hoods like many people do, don't you have road gunk embedded in the hoods?

(I was wondering about the wire wipers myself and almost dup'd this thread. Whew, close call there.)

--
--
Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
 
T

Tim McNamara

Guest
Tire wiping with one's hand is one of those old practices that can be shown to be (probably)
useless- but I still do it automatically. When I ride one of my bikes with fenders, I'm frustrated
by the fact that they're in the way and prevent me from wiping my tires.

With the wheels rotating several times per second, it's possibly 20 rotations by the time I get my
hand down onto the tire. But I still do it, even knowing this.

It even seems like I get more flats on my bikes with fenders. I probably just remember those flats
more clealry because the fender is kind of a nuisance when pulling the wheel out of the frame.

What I don't know is whether "tire savers" actually have any utility. I used them many years ago and
don't remember that they seemed to make any difference- at least I took them off after a while.
 
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Dan Daniel

Guest
On 30 May 2003 02:07:50 GMT, [email protected] (StuBintner) wrote:

>I read with interest the thread on glass and tire wiping. Does anyone else still use tire saver
>"wire wipes?" A few geezers that I know (and I) still do and find that they work very well. Any
>comments?

So I am finally an old geezer! If I print this out, will I get discounts at the matinee?

I've used the wire wipers for years. I don't know if it is them, or that I ride differently, pay
more attention to road debris, when they are on, or the phase of the moon. I know that there is a
definite pattern between using them and getting flats. If I take them off, I start getting flats.
Put them back on, almost no flats. Whether they actually do anything or not, I'll keep them on.
 
T

Terry Morse

Guest
Tim McNamara wrote:

> What I don't know is whether "tire savers" actually have any utility. I used them many years
> ago and don't remember that they seemed to make any difference- at least I took them off after
> a while.

I used them back in the day, and they seemed pretty effective at knocking off goathead thorns before
they punctured the tube. They were not at all effective at preventing glass, staple, wire, or
thumbtack punctures.
--
terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
 
J

Jobst Brandt

Guest
Stuart Bintner writes:

> I read with interest the thread on glass and tire wiping. Does anyone else still use tire saver
> "wire wipes?" A few geezers that I know (and I) still do and find that they work very well. Any
> comments?

Yes. I throw salt over my shoulder and it works like a charm, but then my shoes aren't full of road
dirt on damp days they way my tire saver buddies' were. Flats, for those who ride much, are a random
thing. I have on several tours of the Alps of more than 2000 miles, pumped my clinchers before
leaving home in California and not pumping again until several weeks after my return because I had
no flats. That's the only thing that reminded me there were none.

On the other hand, I sometimes have two or three glass flats in that duration (miles or time) and do
not attribute either condition to tire savers, wiping tires or tossing salt... but I could.

Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
 
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Jobst Brandt

Guest
Terry Morse writes:

> I used them back in the day, and they seemed pretty effective at knocking off goathead thorns
> before they punctured the tube. They were not at all effective at preventing glass, staple, wire,
> or thumbtack punctures.

You must have been riding nearly flat tires because a puncture vine thorn is a spine standing on a
tetrahedron that is so sharp that lightly laying the palm of the hand on the roadside vine will have
them stick in your skin painlessly, it requires so little pressure. If you have more than 50 psi in
your tire, the thorn will penetrate practically to its final depth on the first contact. The only
ones you could effectively knock off are ones on the sides of the tire that would otherwise
penetrate on the first corner taken.

http://www.or.blm.gov/Prineville/weed/puncture.htm http://tinyurl.com/d0xo
http://www.cwma.org/puncturevine.html
http://elib.cs.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0801+0392

Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
 
S

Stubintner

Guest
>So I am finally an old geezer! If I print this out, will I get discounts at the matinee?

My suggestion is to print as you suggest and take it to the local AMC. Chances are the kid selling
tickets thinks you are very old--providing, of course, that you are over 18 years of age.
 
R

Robin Hubert

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Terry Morse writes:
>
> > I used them back in the day, and they seemed pretty effective at knocking off goathead thorns
> > before they punctured the tube. They were not at all effective at preventing glass, staple,
> > wire, or thumbtack punctures.
>
> You must have been riding nearly flat tires because a puncture vine thorn is a spine standing on a
> tetrahedron that is so sharp that lightly laying the palm of the hand on the roadside vine will
> have them stick in your skin painlessly, it requires so little pressure. If you have more than 50
> psi in your tire, the thorn will penetrate practically to its final depth on the first contact.
> The only ones you could effectively knock off are ones on the sides of the tire that would
> otherwise penetrate on the first corner taken.
>
> http://www.or.blm.gov/Prineville/weed/puncture.htm http://tinyurl.com/d0xo
> http://www.cwma.org/puncturevine.html
> http://elib.cs.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0801+0392
>
>

Now that I know what this beast looks like I'd like to know the distribution of it in the U.S. We
don't seem to have it in Illinois and the Midwest. Any links?

Thank you,

--
Robin Hubert <[email protected]
 
J

Jobst Brandt

Guest
Robin Hubert writes:

>>> I used them back in the day, and they seemed pretty effective at knocking off goathead thorns
>>> before they punctured the tube. They were not at all effective at preventing glass, staple,
>>> wire, or thumbtack punctures.

>> You must have been riding nearly flat tires because a puncture vine thorn is a spine standing on
>> a tetrahedron that is so sharp that lightly laying the palm of the hand on the roadside vine will
>> have them stick in your skin painlessly, it requires so little pressure. If you have more than 50
>> psi in your tire, the thorn will penetrate practically to its final depth on the first contact.
>> The only ones you could effectively knock off are ones on the sides of the tire that would
>> otherwise penetrate on the first corner taken.

>> http://www.or.blm.gov/Prineville/weed/puncture.htm http://tinyurl.com/d0xo
>> http://www.cwma.org/puncturevine.html
>> http://elib.cs.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0801+0392

> Now that I know what this beast looks like I'd like to know the distribution of it in the U.S. We
> don't seem to have it in Illinois and the Midwest. Any links?

The trouble is that Tribulus Terrestris is cure-all for quacks and has many listings in that field,
making it hard to find sites that discuss the plant biologically. It grows in all continents and
thrives on barren soil. That is why it is common on western roadsides that are sprayed to suppress
growth of flammable weeds. Puncture vine germinates after other plants have sprouted and gone and it
grows only where there are no competitors.

It is my observation that it sprouts only after the first real hot spell of sumer has passed,
followed by some thunder showers here in California where we have essentially no rain all summer.
Roundup (c) does not kill it either, so late spraying only prevents competitors from returning but
allows its growth.

http://pi.cdfa.ca.gov/weedinfo/TRIBULUS2.html

Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
 
G

G.Daniels

Guest
BE PROGRESSIVE!!! sweep glass from the street!! carry dayglo poster paper and edge it onto the pave'
and scrap the shards off to the side. or cardboard.
 
D

David L. Johnso

Guest
On Fri, 30 May 2003 02:07:50 +0000, StuBintner wrote:

> I read with interest the thread on glass and tire wiping. Does anyone else still use tire saver
> "wire wipes?" A few geezers that I know (and I) still do and find that they work very well. Any
> comments?

I used them back in the 70s. When I got back on my bike in about '95, I wandered into a bike shop
one day looking for tires. The guy at the counter saw I was still using tubulars, and immediately
offerred me a couple of tire savers to cut down on the flats.

They didn't really work, and the wire (basically a piece of a spoke) wore out rather quickly. They
did make a bit of noise, but not enough to substitute for the card in the spokes.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all _`\(,_ | mysteries, and all
knowledge; and though I have all faith, so (_)/ (_) | that I could remove mountains, and have not
charity, I am nothing. [1 Corinth. 13:2]
 
D

David L. Johnso

Guest
On Fri, 30 May 2003 06:21:42 +0000, jobst.brand wrote:

> http://tinyurl.com/d0xo

I particularly like the picture of the car tire covered with the thorns.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | Let's not escape into mathematics. Let's stay with reality. -- _`\(,_ | Michael Crichton
(_)/ (_) |
 
D

Douglas Landau

Guest
Oh ********. Terry is right, they are effective at reducing the number of goatshead punctures, even
on properly inflated tires, and even in the center of the tire. Although sharp, goatsheads are weak
and easily broken and in the vast majority of cases don't go in straight, and get broken off before
going in anywhere near far enough to reach the air.

Doug

[email protected] wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> Terry Morse writes:
>
> > I used them back in the day, and they seemed pretty effective at knocking off goathead thorns
> > before they punctured the tube. They were not at all effective at preventing glass, staple,
> > wire, or thumbtack punctures.
>
> You must have been riding nearly flat tires because a puncture vine thorn is a spine standing on a
> tetrahedron that is so sharp that lightly laying the palm of the hand on the roadside vine will
> have them stick in your skin painlessly, it requires so little pressure. If you have more than 50
> psi in your tire, the thorn will penetrate practically to its final depth on the first contact.
> The only ones you could effectively knock off are ones on the sides of the tire that would
> otherwise penetrate on the first corner taken.
>
> http://www.or.blm.gov/Prineville/weed/puncture.htm http://tinyurl.com/d0xo
> http://www.cwma.org/puncturevine.html
> http://elib.cs.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0801+0392
>
> Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
 
J

Jay Beattie

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Robin Hubert writes:
>
> >>> I used them back in the day, and they seemed pretty effective at knocking off goathead thorns
> >>> before they punctured the tube. They were not at all effective at preventing glass, staple,
> >>> wire, or thumbtack punctures.
>
> >> You must have been riding nearly flat tires because a puncture vine thorn is a spine standing
> >> on a tetrahedron that is so sharp that lightly laying the palm of the hand on the roadside vine
> >> will have them stick in your skin painlessly, it requires so little pressure. If you have more
> >> than 50 psi in your tire, the thorn will penetrate practically to its final depth on the first
> >> contact. The only ones you could effectively knock off are ones on the sides of the tire
that
> >> would otherwise penetrate on the first corner taken.
>
> >> http://www.or.blm.gov/Prineville/weed/puncture.htm http://tinyurl.com/d0xo
> >> http://www.cwma.org/puncturevine.html
> >>
http://elib.cs.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0801+0392
>
> > Now that I know what this beast looks like I'd like to know the distribution of it in the U.S.
> > We don't seem to have it in Illinois and the Midwest. Any links?
>
> The trouble is that Tribulus Terrestris is cure-all for quacks and has many listings in that
> field, making it hard to find sites that discuss the plant biologically. It grows in all
> continents and thrives on barren soil. That is why it is common on western roadsides that are
> sprayed to suppress growth of flammable weeds. Puncture vine germinates after other plants have
> sprouted and gone and it grows only where there are no competitors.
>
> It is my observation that it sprouts only after the first real hot spell of sumer has passed,
> followed by some thunder showers here in California where we have essentially no rain all summer.
> Roundup (c) does not kill it either, so late spraying only prevents competitors from returning but
> allows its growth.
>
> http://pi.cdfa.ca.gov/weedinfo/TRIBULUS2.html

The link indicates that glyphosate (RoundUp) is effective on puncture vine. -- Jay Beattie.
 
J

Jobst Brandt

Guest
Jay Beattie writes:

>> http://pi.cdfa.ca.gov/weedinfo/TRIBULUS2.html

> The link indicates that glyphosate (RoundUp) is effective on puncture vine.

http://www.monsanto.com.au/roundup/RoundupHerbicide.htm

Well it's not. Back in the days when puncture vine was a mystery to bicyclists in this area (no one
knew what the plants habitat or appearance was) I spooked around and talked to some Stanford
biologists who were incensed that I had the temerity to disagree with their equally unknowing
assessment of the plant. I had foolishly mentioned my observation that it only grew where the
university sprayed roadsides and that it was a poor competitor with other weeds.

Thereupon they began a selective spraying all summer of previously sprayed and now puncture vine
infested roadsides. Tribulus terrestris shrank a little but repeatedly came back after being
Roundupped(R). That Roundup(R) negatively affects puncture vine is proven, but it does not get
rid of it.

My main experiment was at my frame builders apartment at the time. His apartment manager kept the
place neat and tidy and among these tasks was keeping the weeds down in the unplanted plot between
sidewalk and street. He regularly sprayed it in spring and subsequently puncture vine with its cute
yellow flowers kept the plot green all summer as it strayed onto the sidewalk and over the curb.

We told the man about the flat tires it causes and demonstrated the density of goat heads in the
vicinity. We convinced him not to spray and that we would trim the weeds. Next summer there was no
puncture vine as we ran a lawn mower over the volunteer wild grasses and clover occasionally.

Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
 
J

Jobst Brandt

Guest
Douglas Landau writes:

> Oh ********. Terry is right, they are effective at reducing the number of goatshead punctures,
> even on properly inflated tires, and even in the center of the tire. Although sharp, goatsheads
> are weak and easily broken and in the vast majority of cases don't go in straight, and get broken
> off before going in anywhere near far enough to reach the air.

Goat heads do not have feet of their own and do not travel far from the plant unless someone travels
through their midst. I think if you take a close look at these seed pods, you'll see they are made
of highly durable strong yet pliable wood. Therefore, getting one or two of them is a rarity and if
you ride over a plant you will pick up at least a dozen thorns. If your tire-saver gets even half of
them you haven't gained anything. On the other hand I have seen people sitting at the roadside
pulling them out of their tires and discarding them onto the street. Thanks!

Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
 
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Jasper Janssen

Guest
On Fri, 30 May 2003 12:25:03 -0400, "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote:

>On Fri, 30 May 2003 06:21:42 +0000, jobst.brand wrote:
>
>> http://tinyurl.com/d0xo
>
>I particularly like the picture of the car tire covered with the thorns.

Don't these things break into pieces once the business end is embedded in even a car tire? I'd
expect the other three tines to be crushed off..

Nasty stuff.

Jasper
 
J

Jobst Brandt

Guest
Jasper Janssen <[email protected]> writes:

>>> http://tinyurl.com/d0xo

>> I particularly like the picture of the car tire covered with the thorns.

> Don't these things break into pieces once the business end is embedded in even a car tire? I'd
> expect the other three tines to be crushed off..

There are only two thorns per pod, the pod is fairly solid wood in roughly in the shape of an orange
segment of up to 60 degrees having a single thorn extending from the middle of each arch so that one
lies parallel to the ground while the other stands vertically. The tip-to-tip outline is a
tetrahedron, the base edge bing the diameter of the orange slice. The flower has 5 petals and the
pod has five segments. This can be seen in the lower picture at:

http://www.or.blm.gov/Prineville/weed/puncture.htm

> Nasty stuff.

No doubt, and the spines have resin on them that make penetration extremely painful. It hurts just
to watch a dog walk into the stuff. The only defense is to stand still and 'cry'. You must rescue
the dog, carry it away and carefully pull out the thorns.

Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
 
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