Glass bakeware vs. Dutch Oven

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Stark, Jan 30, 2006.

  1. Stark

    Stark Guest

    What's the deal here? I've got one of those glass Vision oval roasters
    which I occasionally use for braising when the roast won't fit my Dutch
    Oven. Using time and temp for a Dutch Oven, this glass thang cooks the
    roast in half the time, defeating the whole purpose of slow cooking.
    But once cooked that fast, even the toughest roasts, chuck and round,
    are fork-tender, maybe a little over-done, but good.

    So is there a formula for reducing the temp when braising in glass?
     
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  2. On Mon 30 Jan 2006 06:25:03a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Stark?

    > What's the deal here? I've got one of those glass Vision oval roasters
    > which I occasionally use for braising when the roast won't fit my Dutch
    > Oven. Using time and temp for a Dutch Oven, this glass thang cooks the
    > roast in half the time, defeating the whole purpose of slow cooking.
    > But once cooked that fast, even the toughest roasts, chuck and round,
    > are fork-tender, maybe a little over-done, but good.
    >
    > So is there a formula for reducing the temp when braising in glass?
    >


    A general rule of thumb for glass bakeware is to reduce the temperature by 25
    degrees F. compared to one made of metal. With braising meat, I would
    probably even consider a reduction of as much as 50 degrees F.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright o¿o
    ____________________

    BIOYA
     
  3. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Mon 30 Jan 2006 06:25:03a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Stark?
    >
    > > What's the deal here? I've got one of those glass Vision oval roasters
    > > which I occasionally use for braising when the roast won't fit my Dutch
    > > Oven. Using time and temp for a Dutch Oven, this glass thang cooks the
    > > roast in half the time,


    I don't believe you.

    > A general rule of thumb for glass bakeware is to reduce the temperature by 25
    > degrees F. compared to one made of metal. With braising meat, I would
    > probably even consider a reduction of as much as 50 degrees F.


    Nonsense... baking and braising are two totally different cooking
    methods. Braising entails cooking *in liquid in a covered vessel at a
    relatively low temperature*, whereas no temperature/time compensation
    is made regardless of cookware material, whether it be metal,
    ceramic/glass, or a combination thereof.... with braising the liquid
    controls the temperature and the lid keeps the liquid from escaping.

    Most people oven braise at much too high a temperature, whereas the
    liquid escapes, giving a false impression that high temperature has
    reduced cooking time, well it has, only the result of what's being
    cooked is much different... more closely resembling something cooked
    without a lid at too high a temperature, whereas those people know it's
    done when the smoke detector goes off.

    Baking is done at relatively *high temperatures, in an open vessel,
    without liquid*... and since glass is a poor conductor there's a time
    lag between vessel temperature and that which is being baked, because
    the vessel temperature remains too cold too long at the onset but then
    once finally reaching temperature continues to rise as the liquid
    contained in that which is being baked diminishes, so oven temperature
    must be reduced to prevent that which is being baked from overbaking on
    its exterior before developing a fully baked interior. Real bakers
    never use glass bakeware, because glass bakeware is simply not
    temperature reactive/sensitive enough for proper baking to occur.
    Glass insulates too well at the onset and then becomes too hot at the
    end... glass is a hindrence to even baking... typically the top of a
    cake will burn before its bottom and sides even become warm... lowering
    the oven temperature is really not the answer, not unless you enjoy
    stewed cake. Lowering the temperature for baking in glass is a
    compromise, albiet a poor one... its results in no way approaches that
    which is baked in proper metal bakeware. The only advantage I can
    figure out to using glass/ceramic bakeware is that it looks nicer then
    metal bakeware, but unlike yoose I don't eat bakeware.

    Sheldon
     
  4. Stark

    Stark Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Sheldon <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > > On Mon 30 Jan 2006 06:25:03a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Stark?
    > >
    > > > What's the deal here? I've got one of those glass Vision oval roasters
    > > > which I occasionally use for braising when the roast won't fit my Dutch
    > > > Oven. Using time and temp for a Dutch Oven, this glass thang cooks the
    > > > roast in half the time,

    >
    > I don't believe you.
    >

    Well I don't either, but it's happened, a half dozen times over the
    past years. Braising chuck, round and eye of round at 325 for 3 to 4
    hours, the roast is fork-tender, well-done in 2. Dutch ovened or
    tightly wrapped in foil, roast takes recommended 3 to 4 hours depending
    on size.
     
  5. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Stark wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Sheldon <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > > > On Mon 30 Jan 2006 06:25:03a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Stark?
    > > >
    > > > > What's the deal here? I've got one of those glass Vision oval roasters
    > > > > which I occasionally use for braising when the roast won't fit my Dutch
    > > > > Oven. Using time and temp for a Dutch Oven, this glass thang cooks the
    > > > > roast in half the time,

    > >
    > > I don't believe you.
    > >

    > Well I don't either, but it's happened, a half dozen times over the
    > past years. Braising chuck, round and eye of round at 325 for 3 to 4
    > hours, the roast is fork-tender, well-done in 2. Dutch ovened or
    > tightly wrapped in foil, roast takes recommended 3 to 4 hours depending
    > on size.


    That's not very clear as to what occured.

    Only way to test accurately is to use both types of cookware containing
    the exact same ingredients in the same oven at the same time. Relying
    on memory over long periods as to what was done and what occured is
    highly suspect. What were you drinking and how much... in the time it
    takes to braise I can get stewed... that's how I learned that
    braised/stewed dishes taste best the next day.
     
  6. Stark

    Stark Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Sheldon <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Stark wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Sheldon <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > I don't believe you.
    > > >

    > > Well I don't either, but it's happened, a half dozen times over the
    > > past years. Braising chuck, round and eye of round at 325 for 3 to 4
    > > hours, the roast is fork-tender, well-done in 2. Dutch ovened or
    > > tightly wrapped in foil, roast takes recommended 3 to 4 hours depending
    > > on size.

    >
    > That's not very clear as to what occured.
    >
    > Only way to test accurately is to use both types of cookware containing
    > the exact same ingredients in the same oven at the same time. Relying
    > on memory over long periods as to what was done and what occured is
    > highly suspect. What were you drinking and how much... in the time it
    > takes to braise I can get stewed... that's how I learned that
    > braised/stewed dishes taste best the next day.
    >


    Plymouth gin.
     
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