Gloves for seriously cold weather cycling

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Dingo Jimmy, Apr 24, 2007.

  1. Dingo Jimmy

    Dingo Jimmy New Member

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    Hello from Australia!!

    Where I live - it gets down to -7 degrees Celcius. THat is about 20 Fahrenheit.

    With the clothes I have I feel ok. But despite having 2 pairs of gloves on each hand - they really freeze. To the point of feeling quite painful (is this what frostbite would feel like??)

    I dont get far into the ride when I need to stop just to warm my hands up.

    Has anyone tried using the gloves which are powered by a D cell battery? How well do they work? (I have seen one on line by Nordic Gear)
     
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  2. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    Your gloves may be soaking through with perspiration and losing their insulation value in the wind. Mine didn't feel particularly wet but sure worked better when I put them in the dryer after a ride. An easy test would be to dry out your gloves, then get some disposable rubber gloves to wear under them next to your skin. This is not practical for long term use though but it will tell you if you need to buy a pair which wicks better.
     
  3. ewitz

    ewitz New Member

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  4. gclark8

    gclark8 New Member

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  5. eli_cheez

    eli_cheez New Member

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  6. BigRedSnackFoam

    BigRedSnackFoam New Member

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    I use my snowboarding gloves. They're bulky but even if my hands get wet from sweat they don't lose any insulation value and my hands never get cold.
     
  7. bigpedaler

    bigpedaler New Member

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    i've always just worn regular winter gloves for my winter commutes -- i don't do fun/training rides below 40dg. if i was going to choose something, i'd look at the old wooly liners/leather shells we were issued in the Army. the only thing i found better for the severe cold of Germany was replacing the leather shells w/ the thick rubber chemical gloves issued w/ our chem suits. those, i think, would be too much for the sweat of cycling. i say wool because it truly does what it says -- it insulates wet or dry.
     
  8. BikingBrian

    BikingBrian New Member

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  9. Bro Deal

    Bro Deal New Member

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    I have a pair of Pearl Izumi AmFib gloves that work pretty well. The AmFib lobster glove is even warmer.

    Sometimes I use my mountaineering handwear. For temps over 35F I use Black Diamond Dry Tool gloves.
     
  10. Unbelievably

    Unbelievably New Member

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    Neoprene...;)
    Go to a fishing supply store and see what they have.

    I have a pair of fishing gloves that are neoprene,
    and they are both warm and thin. They are flexable and allow
    me to maintain a good feel on my grips.
     
  11. when eddy ruled

    when eddy ruled New Member

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  12. Huldra

    Huldra New Member

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    Have you considered pogies? Pogies are a sort of overmitt that fit over your handlebar grips, i.e. they stay on your bike. Motorcyclists and quad bikes are sometimes seen with them on, and kayakers on their paddles. I made myself a pair, very inexpensive. Dead easy, work a treat. Around 0c and below a light pair of fleecy gloves was enough underneath to keep hands nice and warm, and above 0c it wasn't necessary to wear gloves at all. They keep the wind out, mostly, and the rain out, mostly...had them on my bike all last winter (in Scandinavia) and they worked really well. I prefer them to gloves.
     
  13. Kestrel12

    Kestrel12 New Member

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    I live in Canberra, Australia and in winter we often get temperatures between -5 and -9 degrees c. In the colder months I generally use a thin windproof glove under my standard cycling gloves. This generally takes care of all but the coldest temperatures. On the really cold days I wear another set of gloves that are designed for warmth - despite being a bit bulkier this combination gets me through anything Canberra weather can throw at me.
     
  14. bannerrefugee

    bannerrefugee New Member

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    I have a friend who used some very thick wool gloves from a hunting store. Wool is good because it works well wet. They were the brightest orange. Excelent for giving signals.

    I know people who used chem packs to keep their feet warm. This would work for gloves I think.
     
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