Glucosamine

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by matty, Dec 31, 2005.

  1. matty

    matty Guest

    What is the recommended 'dosage' for Glucosamine, if taken for knee
    problems, anyone know?1000mg a day, or more?
    TIA
    matty
     
    Tags:


  2. Curt James

    Curt James Guest

    "matty" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What is the recommended 'dosage' for Glucosamine, if
    >taken for knee problems, anyone know?1000mg a day,
    >or more?
    >TIA
    >matty


    I had a bottle of Nature Made Triple Flex Triple Strength supplement
    which recommended two caplets per day. Two caplets provided 1500 mg of
    Glucosamine Hydrochloride, 1200 mg of Chondroitin Sulfate, and 250 mg
    of Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) none of which has an established daily
    value.

    The bottle boasts that the product promotes healthy joint function,
    comfort, flexibility, and mobility, however on the very same label it
    also offers the lament: "These statements have not been evaluated by
    the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to
    dianose, treat, cure or prevent any disease."

    Hnh.

    --
    Curt
    http://curtjames.com/
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    "matty" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What is the recommended 'dosage' for Glucosamine, if taken for knee
    > problems, anyone know?1000mg a day, or more?
    > TIA
    > matty
    >
    >


    1,000 mg. per day per 50 lbs. of body weight.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  4. DZ

    DZ Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "matty" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> What is the recommended 'dosage' for Glucosamine, if taken for knee
    >> problems, anyone know?1000mg a day, or more?

    >
    > 1,000 mg. per day per 50 lbs. of body weight.


    Glucosamine is 40 time more potent than sugar in promoting insulin
    resistance. There have been clinical studies, but the issue of whether
    even common long term dosages are dangerous is not yet settled:

    http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct/show/NCT00065377

    I think it would be wise to determine the smallest amount that works
    and not be too liberal with the dosage.
     
  5. matty

    matty Guest


    > 1,000 mg. per day per 50 lbs. of body weight.


    Gee that sounds a lot! I weigh 185 lbs, so that's almost 4000mg!

    >I think it would be wise to determine the smallest amount that works
    >and not be too liberal with the dosage.


    Problem there being it doesn't 'work' for everyone, so if I don't feel any
    effect is it because it doesn't work for me, or because I'm not taking
    enough (or both)!
    matty
     
  6. DZ

    DZ Guest

    matty <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>I think it would be wise to determine the smallest amount that works
    >>and not be too liberal with the dosage.

    >
    > Problem there being it doesn't 'work' for everyone, so if I don't
    > feel any effect is it because it doesn't work for me, or because I'm
    > not taking enough (or both)!


    Well, I'm just pointing out one needs to be cautious.

    It's been suggested to try and find a dose that works and then
    gradually decrease. It wouldn't be as easy to do as with vit C
    obviously (re Cohen' rule for colds: find the dosage of C that makes
    you run to the toilet and subtract 0.5g).
     
  7. thehick

    thehick Guest

    "Glucosamine is 40 time more potent than sugar in promoting
    insulin resistance. There have been clinical studies, but the
    issue of whether even common long term dosages are
    dangerous is not yet settled: "
    The study you quoted just says they are going to test
    for any effect. unless you also read the results, you are
    just making this conclusion up. much like those that take
    anecdotal placebo effects and build a case FOR the usage
    of glucosamine.

    there are known drawbacks relating to blood pressure. there
    also are some indications that it might help some problems.
    to say it helps "knee pain" is ludicrous. and to recommend
    it in high doses to a stranger without doing a medical
    examination first is worse.
    ....thehick
     
  8. David  Cohen

    David Cohen Guest

    "DZ" <[email protected]> wrote
    > matty <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>I think it would be wise to determine the smallest amount that works
    >>>and not be too liberal with the dosage.

    >>
    >> Problem there being it doesn't 'work' for everyone, so if I don't
    >> feel any effect is it because it doesn't work for me, or because I'm
    >> not taking enough (or both)!

    >
    > Well, I'm just pointing out one needs to be cautious.
    >
    > It's been suggested to try and find a dose that works and then
    > gradually decrease. It wouldn't be as easy to do as with vit C
    > obviously (re Cohen' rule for colds: find the dosage of C that makes
    > you run to the toilet and subtract 0.5g).


    Unless you LIKE the shits. Some people do. Kinky, huh? Go figure.

    David
     
  9. DZ

    DZ Guest

    thehick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> "Glucosamine is 40 time more potent than sugar in promoting insulin
    >> resistance. There have been clinical studies, but the issue of
    >> whether even common long term dosages are dangerous is not yet
    >> settled: "

    >
    > The study you quoted just says they are going to test
    > for any effect.


    I didn't quote the study in support of that statement.

    > unless you also read the results, you are just making this
    > conclusion up.


    Unless there is some other possibility, like, for example, that there
    is more on glucosamine than just one study. Try this -

    http://tinyurl.com/7srkm

    "glucosamine is at least 40 times more potent than glucose in
    mediating desensitization"

    > much like those that take anecdotal placebo effects and build a case
    > FOR the usage of glucosamine.


    Yes, I'm exactly much like those.

    Now that we're clear on that, one mechanism promoting resistance is
    through glucose or glucosamine entering the hexosamine pathway. Only
    1-3% of glucose does that, but nearly all glucosamine, by bypassing
    the key enzyme GFAT regulating the pathway. People taking glucosamine
    in dosages commonly used for supplementation don't show signs of
    development of insulin resistance and diabetes. But these studies
    aren't long enough. It could be that people supplementing with
    glucosamine are substantially increasing their risk of diabetes some
    years from now.
     
  10. locker

    locker Guest

    DZ wrote:
    > matty <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> I think it would be wise to determine the smallest amount

    that
    >>> works and not be too liberal with the dosage.

    >>
    >> Problem there being it doesn't 'work' for everyone, so if I

    don't
    >> feel any effect is it because it doesn't work for me, or

    because
    >> I'm not taking enough (or both)!

    >
    > Well, I'm just pointing out one needs to be cautious.
    >
    > It's been suggested to try and find a dose that works and then
    > gradually decrease. It wouldn't be as easy to do as with vit C
    > obviously (re Cohen' rule for colds: find the dosage of C that

    makes
    > you run to the toilet and subtract 0.5g).


    Cohen's 'rule for colds' is absolute bull shit. Mega-doses of
    vitamin c will do nothing for a cold. And I was starting to
    think you knew what you were talking about....oooops. :)

    I read his posts if I'm looking for a good laugh.


    locker
     
  11. David Cohen

    David Cohen Guest

    locker wrote:
    > DZ wrote:
    > > matty <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>> I think it would be wise to determine the smallest amount

    > that
    > >>> works and not be too liberal with the dosage.
    > >>
    > >> Problem there being it doesn't 'work' for everyone, so if I

    > don't
    > >> feel any effect is it because it doesn't work for me, or

    > because
    > >> I'm not taking enough (or both)!

    > >
    > > Well, I'm just pointing out one needs to be cautious.
    > >
    > > It's been suggested to try and find a dose that works and then
    > > gradually decrease. It wouldn't be as easy to do as with vit C
    > > obviously (re Cohen' rule for colds: find the dosage of C that

    > makes
    > > you run to the toilet and subtract 0.5g).

    >
    > Cohen's 'rule for colds' is absolute bull shit.


    Your doubt of me hurts tremendously. You have hurt my feelings on New
    Years Eve :(

    > Mega-doses of
    > vitamin c will do nothing for a cold. And I was starting to
    > think you knew what you were talking about....oooops. :)


    No, no, really, I would prefer you not take any of my advice. Sump
    pumps the shallow end of the gene pool.

    > I read his posts if I'm looking for a good laugh.


    Instead of flinging your poop on the other "special" kids on the short
    school bus? I'm glad I can make your otherwise dreary life a little
    happier.

    David
     
  12. Dr.G

    Dr.G Guest

    "matty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > > 1,000 mg. per day per 50 lbs. of body weight.

    >
    > Gee that sounds a lot! I weigh 185 lbs, so that's almost 4000mg!
    >
    > >I think it would be wise to determine the smallest amount that works
    > >and not be too liberal with the dosage.

    >
    > Problem there being it doesn't 'work' for everyone, so if I don't feel any
    > effect is it because it doesn't work for me, or because I'm not taking
    > enough (or both)!
    > matty


    Studies support that statement for example, Glucoamine hydrochloride has
    been shown to be no more effective than a placebo in relieving
    osteoarthritis signs and symptoms...1998 study at Mount Sinai Hospital.

    Glucoamine that has worked in clinical studies has been bound to sodium
    (that is the ONLY patented form of Glucoamine in the world) the other form
    of GS is bound to potassium I can say from clinical experience that it
    appears to work. Chrondroitin forget it, it works to made the company
    marketing and selling it money but unless you are in the equine or live
    stock family the molecule is simply to large for humans to absorb. The
    studies that showed a benifit from the use of chrondroitin it is believed to
    be from the sulfur molecule not the chrondroitin.
     
Loading...
Loading...