Going to build a rear wheel!



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T

Tj Poseno

Guest
Well i succesfully built a front wheel, and a proud of myself.

So now im thinking of doing a rear wheel, i ahve the wheela dn everything, thats assembled, but i
bought them all rusty (the spokes) So im gonna dissassemble and clean then reasemble. So what should
i be looking for, now i've heard that one sides spokes are different length, is this true? And both
sides are going to be laced the same right?

just wnated to check before i jumped into this.
 
B

Basjan

Guest
"TJ Poseno" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> now i've heard that one sides spokes are different length, is this true? And both sides are going
> to be laced the same right?

I am no expert at this but also recently built my own set of wheels - a lot of fun. Driveside spokes
(cassette's side) is shorter than non-drive side, but they are (can be) laced the same. The five
important things seem to be roundness (round rim after build), trueness (straight wheel after
build), even dish (rim has to be in the center of the hub or wheel axle), tight enough spoke
tension, and even spoke tension.

Good luck!
 
B

Basjan

Guest
Another trick I have heard of and tried is to dab a small drop of GREEN locktite on each nipple
after the build and after you are sure you have the wheel where you want it. Then spin the wheel,
and let it set for an evening or so. Apparantly this keeps it truer for longer, but some of the
experts here might say I am taking the easy way out, because a properly built wheel should in all
fairness stay true.

Anyone else use some type of "lock-tite" as a rule when wheel building?

"basjan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
> "TJ Poseno" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > now i've heard that one sides spokes are different length, is this true? And both sides are
> > going to be laced the same right?
>
> I am no expert at this but also recently built my own set of wheels - a
lot
> of fun. Driveside spokes (cassette's side) is shorter than non-drive
side,
> but they are (can be) laced the same. The five important things seem to
be
> roundness (round rim after build), trueness (straight wheel after build), even dish (rim has to be
> in the center of the hub or wheel axle), tight enough spoke tension, and even spoke tension.
>
> Good luck!
 
B

B A R R Y B U R

Guest
On Fri, 3 Oct 2003 22:52:40 -0400, "basjan" <[email protected]> wrote:

>Anyone else use some type of "lock-tite" as a rule when wheel building?

No, no, no, no, no, no, no....

Barry
 
H

Harris

Guest
"TJ Poseno" wrote:
> Well i succesfully built a front wheel, and a proud of myself.
>
> So now im thinking of doing a rear wheel, i ahve the wheela dn everything, thats assembled, but i
> bought them all rusty (the spokes) So im gonna dissassemble and clean then reasemble. So what
> should i be looking for, now i've heard that one sides spokes are different length, is this true?
> And both sides are going to be laced the same right?

If the spokes are rusty, I would replace them with stainless steel spokes like "DT" brand. If you're
going to re-use the same hub, make sure it's laced exactly the same (spokes in the same orientation
as before) since the spoke holes will have been deformed (normal) by the original build.

There is much more you need to learn, Grasshopper. Read "The Book".

Art Harris
 
T

Tj Poseno

Guest
Also one thing i forgot to ask is, how will I use a "dish stick" becase in my mine it doesnt seem
like it will work. Its eems like with the cassette on one side, it wont work.
 
M

Mick

Guest
"TJ Poseno" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Well i succesfully built a front wheel, and a proud of myself.
>
> So now im thinking of doing a rear wheel, i ahve the wheela dn everything, thats assembled, but i
> bought them all rusty (the spokes) So im gonna dissassemble and clean then reasemble. So what
> should i be looking for, now i've heard that one sides spokes are different length, is this true?
> And both sides are going to be laced the same right?
>
> just wnated to check before i jumped into this.
i hope you don't rely on this wheel as your regular form of transport...the spokes are [were]
galvanised,an easier way to clean them would be to use steel wool to clean off rust then spray some
clear laquer on to stop em rusting again.as for rebuilding a wheel in this condition, unscrew a
spoke from each side ,then take these to your local bike shop to get the right length for new
ones.building wheels from s/h spokes sucks...even for practise as the threads are cactus. you will
also need a dish tool of some type[to centre the rim,there must be some info out there on wheel
building???????
 
H

Harris

Guest
"TJ Poseno" wrote:

> Also one thing i forgot to ask is, how will I use a "dish stick" becase in my mine it doesnt seem
> like it will work. Its eems like with the cassette on one side, it wont work.

No problem. The center part of the dishing tool touches the locknuts, and the ends touch the rim
surfaces. It will work fine with the cassette in place.

See: http://www.parktool.com/tools/WAG_3.shtml

and

http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/wag.shtml

The other method is to reverse the wheel in the stand and verify that it stays centered. The dishing
to is more accurate though.

Art Harris
 
F

Fred Marx

Guest
Mick wrote:
> "TJ Poseno" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>
>>Well i succesfully built a front wheel, and a proud of myself.
>>
>>So now im thinking of doing a rear wheel, i ahve the wheela dn everything, thats assembled, but i
>>bought them all rusty (the spokes) So im gonna dissassemble and clean then reasemble. So what
>>should i be looking for, now i've heard that one sides spokes are different length, is this true?
>>And both sides are going to be laced the same right?

yes the lengths are different, sometimes only enough that you can't tell them apart. The lace
pattern will be the same on both sides unless it was built with two different patterns (highend
wheels sometimes are..) Really important! Take note of the direction the spokes "pull away" at the
hub when looking at the hub from the drive side. You want to reproduce this exactly. Find a good
refence book. Brandt is good but you'll want to read it through to make sure you understand the
process cause i't slightly more complex than building a front.

>>
>>just wnated to check before i jumped into this.
>
> i hope you don't rely on this wheel as your regular form of transport...the spokes are [were]
> galvanised,an easier way to clean them would be to use steel wool to clean off rust then spray
> some clear laquer on to stop em rusting again.as for rebuilding a wheel in this condition, unscrew
> a spoke from each side ,then take these to your local bike shop to get the right length for new
> ones.building wheels from s/h spokes sucks...even for practise as the threads are cactus.

almost noone reuses spokes unless one is 100% sure of their condition and quality, they're cheap
insurance at about 1.00 or so each with nipple.... so you're looking at about 30-40 a wheel.

you will also need a dish tool of some
> type[to centre the rim,there must be some info out there on wheel building???????
>

Jobst Brandt "The Bicycle Wheel" al the physics and a set nby tstep to beutiful wheels. It's listed
at Amazon.com or see your LBS. the is another well rated refrence at amaon but can't remeber the
title I uas Brandt cause it's how I learned and I figure why change?
 
T

Tj Poseno

Guest
Well thanks everyone, ill probably take a picture of the rim before, just in case, but i think i can
handle it.

Plus the rims was free, so nothing lost.

Thanks again
 
A

Alex Rodriguez

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
>Well i succesfully built a front wheel, and a proud of myself. So now im thinking of doing a rear
>wheel, i ahve the wheela dn everything, thats assembled, but i bought them all rusty (the spokes)
>So im gonna dissassemble and clean then reasemble. So what should i be looking for, now i've heard
>that one sides spokes are different length, is this true? And both sides are going to be laced the
>same right?
>
>just wnated to check before i jumped into this.

If your spokes are rusty, chuck em. They are not stainless steel. I wouldn't waste my time building
a wheel with anything tubt stainless steel spokes.
----------------
Alex
 
A

Alex Rodriguez

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
>Another trick I have heard of and tried is to dab a small drop of GREEN locktite on each nipple
>after the build and after you are sure you have the wheel where you want it. Then spin the wheel,
>and let it set for an evening or so. Apparantly this keeps it truer for longer, but some of the
>experts here might say I am taking the easy way out, because a properly built wheel should in all
>fairness stay true.
>
>Anyone else use some type of "lock-tite" as a rule when wheel building?

Loc-tite si not necessary if a wheel is properly built. If anything, it can mask a poor build. It
also makes it impossible to do roadside repairs if you have an accident and need to make the wheel
rideable to get you home.
---------------
Alex
 
B

Bruce Jackson

Guest
"basjan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

> Anyone else use some type of "lock-tite" as a rule when wheel building?

I found it necessary for radial laced wheels. Radial spokes will loosen without some sort of
threadlock compound.
--
Bruce Jackson - Sr. Systems Programmer - DMSP, a M/A/R/C Group company
 
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