Going tubeless?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by rclouviere, Oct 3, 2020.

  1. rclouviere

    rclouviere New Member

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    I’ve recently gone tubeless on the bike I ride on local flat roads because, if I’m stranded, i have cell service to be rescued just in case the tubeless tire goes flat. I’d like to also go tubeless on my climbing bike, but am concerned about having a flat in the middle of nowhere without cell service.

    Thoughts?
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Do you have any medical issues limiting the use of your hands?
    If not, learn to fix a flat.
    In the somewhat rare event of a flat too big for the sealant to plug up: unseat tire, remove valve, install tube. Reseat tire, inflate tube, finish ride.
    When home, deflate tube, remove tire. Locate puncture. Clean sealant off, patch tire from inside. Reinstall valve in rim, reinstall tire. Add sealant, inflate, ride.
     
  3. rclouviere

    rclouviere New Member

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    Thanks, i guess.

    I don’t have any disabilities, and I’ve certainly fixed my share of flats, but never on a tubeless tire. Installing these tires was rough and took lots of time. Might be a little easier taking them off, but not sure.
     
  4. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    Thoughts on your thought? :D:p:D

    Why would you want to go tubeless on your climbing bike if getting stranded is a concern to you?

    I myself like tried and true products. I'll avoid going tubeless forever if they keep making clinchers. Just me though.

    But curious as to why you want to go tubeless on your climbing bike. Is the weight loss feeling that much better than clinchers? Do you really feel that much of a difference that would make you place security before weight penalty?

    I have never ridden tubeless so I am just wondering why you want to switch. :)
     
  5. rclouviere

    rclouviere New Member

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    i really like how stable it feels, especially cornering. And, I’m thinking it’ll take care of almost any puncture, unless it’s so bad, the tire is ruined, if that happens, I’m in trouble either way.
    Since posting, i saw an item in bicycling magazine (Stan’s DART) that can be inserted in the tubeless tire if the hole is too big for the sealant. With that and maybe a boot, i may be able to get away with just carrying a couple co2’s
     
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  6. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    Cool! I'm not sure of your size but I have been descending mountain roads since 1996 on clinchers. Speeds up to 40+ on winding switchback roads. I'm a Clydesdale at 230-260 and never had a problem with feeling unstable. But it is interesting to read the opinions and pov from others. As mentioned before, never had a problem with clinchers so I won't switch unless I have to.

    Check out the descent here starting at 1:45 ish. We have a strava segment on Glendora Mtn Rd descent with about 15,000+ riders and I'm somewhere around 3,000 (including Tour or California pros) so not like I'm a baby on the descents. I like clinchers and actually feel more unstable on low spoke count wheels. :D

     
  7. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    I used tubeless for three years or so. Finally I started getting flats and it is impossible to put a tube in most of the modern tubeless tires and rims without pinching the tube. However, they do make tubeless repair kits that are dealt with from outside of the tire. One type has a push-in plug which is similar to the way they repair tubeless car tires. Another uses a little wedge device and you push in this stuff called "bacon" Most of the time if you get a flat large enough for the sealant not to be effective, it will have torn the tire cord as well. Using either of these other repair methods USUALLY will get you home but it is possible to get a large enough hole that you cannot repair it by any method.

    But for my part I just couldn't stand messing about with tubeless tires and all of the goo. So I finally returned to clincher rims and clincher tires..

    But as to your question. What makes you think that you couldn't be equally stranded with any tire system? Clincher, tubeless and tubular can all be cut so badly that they cannot be repaired. The trick is in the chances of you getting such a problem and with Tubeless you probably have less of a chance of catastrophic failure than any other type. Especially if you carry the plug system. https://www.amazon.com/BriskMore-Tu...ubeless+tire+repair+kit&qid=1604002078&sr=8-8

    Always remember to renew the sealant every 6 months or so. Despite the claims, NO sealant is forever. Pull the tire off and completely wash out the old sealant and allow the tire to dry and replace it and inject the new sealant in.
     
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  8. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    https://www.globalcyclingnetwork.co...-tubeless-tyre-gcn-tech-puncture-repair-guide
     
  9. rclouviere

    rclouviere New Member

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    Great advice. Thanks. With my clinchers, i carry a park tool boot that can probably fix most tears.
     
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