Gone Rohloff for the weekend

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Euan, Aug 11, 2006.

  1. Snuffy

    Snuffy New Member

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    Nope.. mine doesn't do that... what've you been doing to yours?? :p

    Actually, you've probably put more kms on your Blade 8 than I have on mine... been riding the other bike a bit more lately.... hard to say how many km I've done on it though b/c I drowned my computer and haven't bothered to replace it...
     


  2. suzyj

    suzyj New Member

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    Snuffy wrote:

    > Nope.. mine doesn't do that... what've you been doing to yours?? :p

    Mine just doesn't shift if I'm pushing too hard. Once I ease up the pressure, it then shifts.

    I just replaced the BB and cranks on mine. The cheap BB was starting to make horrid clunking noises, and the cranks don't have a replaceable chainwheel, so rather than find a replacement BB, I just bought a set of Campy Mirage cranks with matching BB from Probikekit.

    The chainline is perfect with the inner chainwheel on the outside position, and a little shaved off the chainwheel mounting bolts so that it would all go together. The cranks are even black. The 39 tooth chainwheel is one tooth bigger than the original (and steel). When that wears out I might try a TA 1/8" one.

    Cheers,

    Suzy (dislikes BBs with plastic cups)
     
  3. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    suzyj wrote:

    > Mine just doesn't shift if I'm pushing too hard. Once I ease up the
    > pressure, it then shifts.


    That possibly means the gears have positive mesh, a good thing.

    > Suzy (dislikes BBs with plastic cups)


    Theo (dislikes BBs and wheel bearings with cups)
     
  4. Snuffy

    Snuffy New Member

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    Yeah, that's what mine does. I wonder what GG has done to his...

    Although, it does make a slight clicking sound sometimes when shifting between two specific gears (3 & 4 I think) if I've got the power on. Doesn't sound like anything's about to blow up though.

    Interesting... been thinking about changing the crankset. The 38T isn't quite right for my commute. I find myself in 5 to 7 most of the time, top speeding in 8 (when I burn past Ghostgum's place) and never getting below 3 on the climbs. It's not too bad, but I reckon a 42 would probably be just right. Haven't done the maths yet though.
     
  5. Theo Bekkers wrote:

    > suzyj wrote:
    >
    >> Mine just doesn't shift if I'm pushing too hard. Once I ease
    >> up the pressure, it then shifts.

    >
    > That possibly means the gears have positive mesh, a good
    > thing.


    The gears themselves are typically constant mesh (at least I
    don't know of any that aren't). Shifting is achieved by
    sliding the one-way ratchet sleeve assemblies which carry sets
    of gears (often gears within gears).

    John
     
  6. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    John Henderson wrote:
    > Theo Bekkers wrote:
    >
    >> suzyj wrote:
    >>
    >>> Mine just doesn't shift if I'm pushing too hard. Once I ease
    >>> up the pressure, it then shifts.

    >>
    >> That possibly means the gears have positive mesh, a good
    >> thing.

    >
    > The gears themselves are typically constant mesh (at least I
    > don't know of any that aren't). Shifting is achieved by
    > sliding the one-way ratchet sleeve assemblies which carry sets
    > of gears (often gears within gears).


    I expected it to be constant mesh and was going to say the dogs have
    positive mesh, but thought that might confuse some people. :)

    Theo
     
  7. cogcontrol

    cogcontrol New Member

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  8. cogcontrol wrote:

    > Random Data Wrote:
    >> On Sun, 13 Aug 2006 07:45:31 +1000, John Henderson wrote:
    >>
    >> > Does anyone know if a Rohloff setup is available here in
    >> > Australia fitted to an MTB or hybrid?

    >>
    >> Have a look at www.velosmith.com.au


    Thanks. The "Jota" is very close to what I'm looking for. If
    it wasn't for those vertical dropouts...

    John
     
  9. Friday

    Friday Guest

    John Henderson wrote:
    > cogcontrol wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Random Data Wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sun, 13 Aug 2006 07:45:31 +1000, John Henderson wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Does anyone know if a Rohloff setup is available here in
    >>>>Australia fitted to an MTB or hybrid?
    >>>
    >>>Have a look at www.velosmith.com.au

    >
    >
    > Thanks. The "Jota" is very close to what I'm looking for. If
    > it wasn't for those vertical dropouts...
    >
    > John


    I used to drool over a Larveda Jota at Herb Watsons in Vic park. Used to
    get the Duke tuned there.

    http://www.thecreeper.net/myjota.htm

    Friday
     
  10. Jack Russell

    Jack Russell Guest

    John Henderson wrote:
    > cogcontrol wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Random Data Wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Sun, 13 Aug 2006 07:45:31 +1000, John Henderson wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Does anyone know if a Rohloff setup is available here in
    >>>>Australia fitted to an MTB or hybrid?
    >>>
    >>>Have a look at www.velosmith.com.au

    >
    >
    > Thanks. The "Jota" is very close to what I'm looking for. If
    > it wasn't for those vertical dropouts...
    >
    > John

    Pardon my ignorance but what is wrong with vertical dropouts? I thought
    they were the norm with Rohloff?

    --
    Remove norubbish to reply
     
  11. Jack Russell wrote:

    > Pardon my ignorance but what is wrong with vertical dropouts?
    > I thought they were the norm with Rohloff?


    They require a chain tensioner. That's more weight, more to go
    wrong, and lots more friction because they gunk up easily and
    often.

    I'd rather adjust the chain tension periodically via horizontal
    dropouts. In fact, on my existing SRAM/Sachs hub I use the
    need for adjustment tell me it's time to measure, clean and
    relube the chain.

    John
     
  12. Jack Russell

    Jack Russell Guest

    John Henderson wrote:
    > Jack Russell wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Pardon my ignorance but what is wrong with vertical dropouts?
    >>I thought they were the norm with Rohloff?

    >
    >
    > They require a chain tensioner. That's more weight, more to go
    > wrong, and lots more friction because they gunk up easily and
    > often.
    >
    > I'd rather adjust the chain tension periodically via horizontal
    > dropouts. In fact, on my existing SRAM/Sachs hub I use the
    > need for adjustment tell me it's time to measure, clean and
    > relube the chain.
    >
    > John

    No, I think you will find the Velosmith and certainly the SJS Raven have
    a concentric bottom bracket which is used to adjust the chain tension.
    Certainly I agree about the tensioner, no point in having a hub gear if
    you still have something hanging down waiting to be broken off!
    What do you use for adjusting, the old fashioned (not that there is
    anything wrong with that) screw adjusters?

    Jack


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  13. "John Henderson" wrote:
    > Jack Russell wrote:
    >
    >> Pardon my ignorance but what is wrong with vertical dropouts?
    >> I thought they were the norm with Rohloff?

    >
    > They require a chain tensioner. That's more weight, more to go
    > wrong, and lots more friction because they gunk up easily and
    > often.
    >
    > I'd rather adjust the chain tension periodically via horizontal
    > dropouts. In fact, on my existing SRAM/Sachs hub I use the
    > need for adjustment tell me it's time to measure, clean and
    > relube the chain.


    Check that link for the Jota out again then. It has *no chain tensioner*,
    just an oversize or elliptical bottom bracket. This serves to tension your
    chain securely, while at the same time you more can easily remove and
    install your rear wheel compared to using horizontal dropouts. Rohloff make
    a special version of their hub with a special torque fitting that slots into
    the dropout also, removing the need for a big clunky torque arm bolted to
    your chainstay. Velosmith use this design, as do St John Street Cycles
    (Thorn) in the UK.

    --
    Cheers
    Peter

    ~~~ ~ [email protected]
    ~~ ~ _- \,
    ~~ (*)/ (*)
     
  14. Jack Russell wrote:

    > No, I think you will find the Velosmith and certainly the SJS
    > Raven have a concentric bottom bracket which is used to adjust
    > the chain tension. Certainly I agree about the tensioner, no
    > point in having a hub gear if you still have something hanging
    > down waiting to be broken off! What do you use for adjusting,
    > the old fashioned (not that there is anything wrong with that)
    > screw adjusters?


    Interesting, thanks Jack and Peter.

    John
     
  15. Peter Signorini wrote:

    > Check that link for the Jota out again then. It has *no chain
    > tensioner*, just an oversize or elliptical bottom bracket.
    > This serves to tension your chain securely, while at the same
    > time you more can easily remove and install your rear wheel
    > compared to using horizontal dropouts. Rohloff make a special
    > version of their hub with a special torque fitting that slots
    > into the dropout also, removing the need for a big clunky
    > torque arm bolted to your chainstay. Velosmith use this
    > design, as do St John Street Cycles (Thorn) in the UK.


    OK, I remember reading somewhere about a Rohloff chain
    tensioner, and assumed that was the only solution for vertical
    dropouts. I found at least one reference to it at:
    http://www.kinetics-online.co.uk/html/rohloff.shtml although
    that site goes on to mention the alternative of the eccentric
    bottom bracket.

    Thanks again.

    John
     
  16. cogcontrol

    cogcontrol New Member

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    Have look the Velosmith Gallery page and it shows the way of running Rohloff, the sliding rear dropouts. Possibly bit lighter than the eccentric bottom bracket but more expesive.

    CC

    > Check that link for the Jota out again then. It has *no chain
    > tensioner*, just an oversize or elliptical bottom bracket.
    > This serves to tension your chain securely, while at the same
    > time you more can easily remove and install your rear wheel
    > compared to using horizontal dropouts. Rohloff make a special
    > version of their hub with a special torque fitting that slots
     
  17. cogcontrol wrote:

    > Have look the Velosmith Gallery page and it shows the way of
    > running Rohloff, the sliding rear dropouts. Possibly bit
    > lighter than the eccentric bottom bracket but more expesive.


    Thanks - I've gone from not enough choice to too much.

    John
     
  18. Jack Russell

    Jack Russell Guest

    John Henderson wrote:
    > Peter Signorini wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Check that link for the Jota out again then. It has *no chain
    >>tensioner*, just an oversize or elliptical bottom bracket.
    >>This serves to tension your chain securely, while at the same
    >>time you more can easily remove and install your rear wheel
    >>compared to using horizontal dropouts. Rohloff make a special
    >>version of their hub with a special torque fitting that slots
    >>into the dropout also, removing the need for a big clunky
    >>torque arm bolted to your chainstay. Velosmith use this
    >>design, as do St John Street Cycles (Thorn) in the UK.

    >
    >
    > OK, I remember reading somewhere about a Rohloff chain
    > tensioner, and assumed that was the only solution for vertical
    > dropouts. I found at least one reference to it at:
    > http://www.kinetics-online.co.uk/html/rohloff.shtml although
    > that site goes on to mention the alternative of the eccentric
    > bottom bracket.
    >
    > Thanks again.
    >
    > John

    By the way I asked SJS what it would cost to ship a Raven to Australia.
    They said about 210 pounds which of course should be more than offset by
    not having to pay UK VAT (GST). But then you will have to pay Australian
    duty and taxes I guess. I have bought both my Thorn's over there, ridden
    them through Europe then brought hem home. Both times Aussie customs
    have been kind to me on the basis the bike was used they have given
    "discounted tax"

    --
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