Good beginners bike?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Paul Hutchings, Apr 22, 2003.

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  1. Went hunting for shades today and ended up in a big bike shop in Wolverhampton - it's been a few
    years but it made me realise how much I used to enjoy riding, so I'm chewing over getting
    another bike.

    Likely uses would be canal-paths and that sort of thing.

    Any thoughts on what I should be looking at? Guy in the shop suggested something like a Specialized
    Hardrock would be a good start point as it's half-decent to begin with but if I stuck with it and so
    wanted it's good enough to stand a few upgrades...

    Early days and it may be a fad but any thoughts?

    regards Paul
    --
    paul <at> spamcop.net
     
    Tags:


  2. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Paul Hutchings" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Went hunting for shades today and ended up in a big bike shop in Wolverhampton - it's been a few
    > years but it made me realise how much I used to enjoy riding, so I'm chewing over getting
    > another bike.
    >
    > Likely uses would be canal-paths and that sort of thing.
    >
    > Any thoughts on what I should be looking at? Guy in the shop suggested something like a
    > Specialized Hardrock would be a good start point as it's half-decent to begin with but if I stuck
    > with it and so wanted it's good enough to stand a few upgrades...
    >
    > Early days and it may be a fad but any thoughts?

    For tow-paths & similar the main question is to bounce or not to bounce. The guy in the shop has
    pointed you at an OK entry level mountain bike.

    For the same sort of money you could get a good entry level hybrid. Lighter because of the lack of
    front suspension forks -- somewhat more efficient since you're not bouncing the forks up & down
    while riding.

    Last time a similar question came up we had a flame war between those who advocated bouncy bikes --
    suggesting anything rigid was just eastern European scaffolding poles for old foggie masochists --
    and the sensible faction who suggested that suspension is nice for some things (going over real
    rough stuff or throwing yourself down mountains) but unnecessary for nice smooth tracks and country
    lanes -- and that the fan of bounce had just swallowed the marketing hype lock, stock and
    suspension unit..

    I would recommend you go somewhere where you can hire a bike or two for the day and cycle a bit to
    get the feel for what you want and what you will be comfortable with -- and to see if you really
    want to get back in the saddle.

    Have fun.

    T
     
  3. Smudger

    Smudger Guest

    "Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Paul Hutchings" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Went hunting for shades today and ended up in a big bike shop in Wolverhampton - it's been a few
    > > years but it made me realise how much I used to enjoy riding, so I'm chewing over getting
    > > another bike.
    > >
    > > Likely uses would be canal-paths and that sort of thing.
    > >
    > > Any thoughts on what I should be looking at? Guy in the shop suggested something like a
    > > Specialized Hardrock would be a good start point as
    it's
    > > half-decent to begin with but if I stuck with it and so wanted it's good enough to stand a few
    > > upgrades...
    > >
    > > Early days and it may be a fad but any thoughts?
    >
    > For tow-paths & similar the main question is to bounce or not to bounce. The guy in the shop has
    > pointed you at an OK entry level mountain bike.
    >
    > For the same sort of money you could get a good entry level hybrid.
    Lighter
    > because of the lack of front suspension forks -- somewhat more efficient since you're not bouncing
    > the forks up & down while riding.
    >
    > Last time a similar question came up we had a flame war between those who advocated bouncy bikes
    > -- suggesting anything rigid was just eastern European scaffolding poles for old foggie masochists
    > -- and the sensible faction who suggested that suspension is nice for some things (going over real
    > rough stuff or throwing yourself down mountains) but unnecessary for nice smooth tracks and
    > country lanes -- and that the fan of bounce had
    just
    > swallowed the marketing hype lock, stock and suspension unit..
    >
    > I would recommend you go somewhere where you can hire a bike or two for
    the
    > day and cycle a bit to get the feel for what you want and what you will be comfortable with -- and
    > to see if you really want to get back in the
    saddle.
    >
    > Have fun.
    >
    > T
    >
    >

    Here we go - you just don't need bounce. It adds weight, takes away power and causes you maintenance
    headaches. Cyclists have been going off road (rough stuff) for years before the bounce fad. Now if
    you want to try and kill youself by trying downhilling then wieght and bounce is what you need. If
    not, then forget it. If you need any further convincing just sit at the side of the road and watch
    all those cyclist on suspension bikes bouncing up and down but going slow.

    If you need some suspension off road, on a hybrid or a rigid mountain bike, then I recommend fitting
    the excellent Brooks Conquest saddle. It will last you a lifetime and will be your back's friend.

    "But what about all those ruts?" I hear the suspension fans saying. Well get out of the saddle and
    use your elbows and knees. With those joints and decent bike handling skills you'll be able to
    tackle all but the silliest off-road stuff.

    There. Flame away.
     
  4. Dreamlx10

    Dreamlx10 Guest

    "Paul Hutchings" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Went hunting for shades today and ended up in a big bike shop in Wolverhampton - it's been a few
    > years but it made me realise how much I used to enjoy riding, so I'm chewing over getting
    > another bike.
    >
    > Likely uses would be canal-paths and that sort of thing.
    >
    > Any thoughts on what I should be looking at? Guy in the shop suggested something like a
    > Specialized Hardrock would be a good start point as it's half-decent to begin with but if I stuck
    > with it and so wanted it's good enough to stand a few upgrades...
    >
    > Early days and it may be a fad but any thoughts?
    >
    > regards Paul
    > --
    > paul <at> spamcop.net

    Try Edinburgh Bike for good, cheap, basic mountain bikes with and without suspension forks.

    http://www.edinburgh-bicycle.co.uk/catalogue/subcollections.cfm?ID=983

    Hope this helps.

    Graham
     
  5. Nc

    Nc Guest

    "Smudger" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > If you need some suspension off road, on a hybrid or a rigid mountain
    bike,
    > then I recommend fitting the excellent Brooks Conquest saddle. It will
    last
    > you a lifetime and will be your back's friend.

    Of course, your backside might not be Brooks compatible, and its a heavy waste of money. My backside
    required change of saddle after about 8 miles, whereas my older "crap" saddle is good for 70+.

    Fortunately I was able to sell the one I bought to someone with a Brooks compatible backside during
    the "Brooks crisis" of a couple of years ago, so recouped most of my investment.

    This proves some people are Brooks compatible and others are not.

    Alternative recommendations for saddles for light (10st4) and tall (6ft1) riders on traditional
    drop-bar tourer would be appreciated.

    NC
     
  6. Smudger

    Smudger Guest

    "NC" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Smudger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > If you need some suspension off road, on a hybrid or a rigid mountain
    > bike,
    > > then I recommend fitting the excellent Brooks Conquest saddle. It will
    > last
    > > you a lifetime and will be your back's friend.
    >
    > Of course, your backside might not be Brooks compatible, and its a heavy waste of money. My
    > backside required change of saddle after about 8 miles, whereas my older "crap" saddle is good
    > for 70+.
    >
    > Fortunately I was able to sell the one I bought to someone with a Brooks compatible backside
    > during the "Brooks crisis" of a couple of years ago,
    so
    > recouped most of my investment.
    >
    > This proves some people are Brooks compatible and others are not.
    >
    >
    >
    > Alternative recommendations for saddles for light (10st4) and tall (6ft1) riders on traditional
    > drop-bar tourer would be appreciated.
    >
    > NC
    >
    >

    I always found the Selle Italia Turbo a good all round saddle. I am of similar dimensions.
     
  7. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Paul Hutchings <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Any thoughts on what I should be looking at? Guy in the shop suggested something like a
    > Specialized Hardrock would be a good start point as it's half-decent to begin with but if I stuck
    > with it and so wanted it's good enough to stand a few upgrades...
    >

    Take the time to go to a few bike shops *and* test ride a few different makes of bike before you buy
    anything. They can feel quite different to ride so find out what feels good to you. Once you've got
    the feel of what you like you can then go back and with your new knowledge get the one you like
    tweaked to feel just right. A good shop should be more than happy to do this and if they won't its
    probably not one you want to buy from.

    Its far more likely you will stick with it if the bike feels comfortable. The Hardrock has started
    many people off on riding but it may or may not fit you and your preferred riding style.

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable man persists in trying to
    adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man." -- George
    Bernard Shaw
     
  8. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Tue, 22 Apr 2003 20:26:57 +0100, "Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I would recommend you go somewhere where you can hire a bike or two for the day and cycle a bit to
    >get the feel for what you want and what you will be comfortable with -- and to see if you really
    >want to get back in the saddle.

    Good advice, especially since many hire shops will have ex-hire bikes at sensible prices so if you
    find a bike which suits you may be able to ride away on one there and then. Certainly the case with
    the hire shops round the Tissington and Manifold trails (I would go to the shops run by the National
    Parks folks, they seem to be better run at the moment, but that's a personal thing). The most you
    can lose is a nice day cycling in some lovely countryside, and how bad would that be?

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  9. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Tue, 22 Apr 2003 20:55:10 +0100, "NC" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Alternative recommendations for saddles for light (10st4) and tall (6ft1) riders on traditional
    >drop-bar tourer would be appreciated.

    Selle San Marco Rolls, for sure.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  10. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    I have a san marco rolls classic sat here doing nothing. It's for blokes, obviously, and I have a
    much more comfy selle italia octavia on my bike now (I'm a girlie). Tis in pristine condition,
    having done less than 100 miles - tiny marks on the rails from being fitted to a bike, of course,
    but otherwise nothing. No idea how much it'd be to ship, but if you're interested, make me a
    sensible offer (my email addy is fake, so reply here'll be fine) and I'll look into the shipping
    cost. Attractive leather finish. It's what ships as standard on the Dawes Audax.

    Velvet

    PS. Even given it's a blokes saddle, I can tell it's comfy - just needed to be a couple of cm
    wider on the rear to accommodate my sit-bones properly, instead of one, and only half the
    other bone ;-)

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 22 Apr 2003 20:55:10 +0100, "NC" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Alternative recommendations for saddles for light (10st4) and tall (6ft1) riders on traditional
    > >drop-bar tourer would be appreciated.
    >
    > Selle San Marco Rolls, for sure.
    >
    > Guy
    > ===
    > ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    > dynamic DNS permitting)
    > NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    > work. Apologies.
     
  11. >old foggie masochists

    Would that be a masochist in a low-lying cloud then???

    Cheers, helen s ;-)

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending a reply!

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  12. Nc

    Nc Guest

    "Smudger" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "NC" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]cis.de...
    > > Alternative recommendations for saddles for light (10st4) and tall
    (6ft1)
    > > riders on traditional drop-bar tourer would be appreciated.

    > I always found the Selle Italia Turbo a good all round saddle. I am of similar dimensions.

    Thanks, I'll give it some consideration. Some other Selle Italia models were on my possible list,
    unfortunately they tended towards the expensive (Max Flite Genuine Gel for instance, where the tiny
    amount of integral suspension sounded attractive).

    Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Selle San Marco Rolls, for sure.

    Possible.. I have one on a MTB (sacrilege?) with a USE suspension post under it. I found it lacked a
    little give on the touring bike with a ridged post. Might be worth swapping back to see if my views
    have changed.

    "Velvet" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I have a san marco rolls classic sat here doing nothing. It's for blokes, obviously, ......make me
    > a sensible offer ..........

    Thank you for the offer. I'll bear it in mind if I decide I need a second example.

    NC
     
  13. Alex Graham

    Alex Graham Guest

    Velvet wrote:
    > I have a san marco rolls classic sat here doing nothing. It's for blokes, obviously, and I have a
    > much more comfy selle italia octavia on my bike now (I'm a girlie). Tis in pristine condition,
    > having done less than 100 miles - tiny marks on the rails from being fitted to a bike, of course,
    > but otherwise nothing. No idea how much it'd be to ship, but if you're interested, make me a
    > sensible offer (my email addy is fake, so reply here'll be fine) and I'll look into the shipping
    > cost. Attractive leather finish. It's what ships as standard on the Dawes Audax.
    >
    > Velvet
    >
    > PS. Even given it's a blokes saddle, I can tell it's comfy - just needed to be a couple of cm
    > wider on the rear to accommodate my sit-bones properly, instead of one, and only half the
    > other bone ;-)

    If the OP doesnt want it or doesnt mind me butting in here, I'd offer a fiver for it. Dunno how much
    its worth/how much you were expecting though... (thats a fiver + shipping by the way)

    cheers,

    --

    -Alex

    ----------------------------------
    [email protected]

    http://alexpg.ath.cx:3353/cycling.php http://www.westerleycycling.org.uk
    ----------------------------------
     
  14. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    "Alex Graham" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Velvet wrote:
    > > I have a san marco rolls classic sat here doing nothing. It's for
    blokes,
    > > obviously, and I have a much more comfy selle italia octavia on my bike
    now
    > > (I'm a girlie). Tis in pristine condition, having done less than 100 miles - tiny marks on the
    > > rails from being fitted to a bike, of course,
    but
    > > otherwise nothing. No idea how much it'd be to ship, but if you're interested, make me a
    > > sensible offer (my email addy is fake, so reply here'll be fine) and I'll look into the shipping
    > > cost. Attractive
    leather
    > > finish. It's what ships as standard on the Dawes Audax.
    > >
    > > Velvet
    > >
    > > PS. Even given it's a blokes saddle, I can tell it's comfy - just
    needed to
    > > be a couple of cm wider on the rear to accommodate my sit-bones
    properly,
    > > instead of one, and only half the other bone ;-)
    >
    > If the OP doesnt want it or doesnt mind me butting in here, I'd offer a fiver for it. Dunno how
    > much its worth/how much you were expecting though... (thats a fiver + shipping by the way)
    >
    > cheers,
    >
    > --
    >
    > -Alex
    >
    > ----------------------------------
    > [email protected]
    >
    > http://alexpg.ath.cx:3353/cycling.php http://www.westerleycycling.org.uk
    > ----------------------------------
    >

    A little bit more than a fiver, given it's in mint condition ;-) Ah well, maybe one day, or I'll
    just hang on to it and if I ever sell my current bike to get a different one, I'll put the rolls
    back on it - want to keep my comfy selle italia now!

    Velvet
     
  15. Alex Graham

    Alex Graham Guest

    Velvet wrote:

    > A little bit more than a fiver, given it's in mint condition ;-) Ah well, maybe one day, or I'll
    > just hang on to it and if I ever sell my current bike to get a different one, I'll put the rolls
    > back on it - want to keep my comfy selle italia now!

    Fair enough :)

    what 'bout a tenner, inc cheapest p&p then?

    --

    -Alex

    ----------------------------------
    [email protected]

    http://alexpg.ath.cx:3353/cycling.php http://www.westerleycycling.org.uk
    ----------------------------------
     
  16. Mal

    Mal Guest

    >(my email addy is fake, so reply here'll be fine)

    [email protected] - really? sounds genuine to me!

    Mine isn't fake. I suppose that explains some of the 50+ emails I get daily

    sorts of untold muck.

    Or should I be paranoid?

    Mal.
     
  17. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >old foggie masochists
    >
    > Would that be a masochist in a low-lying cloud then???

    No, clearly (sic) its a person of age who dislikes smoking a pipe but does so anyway -- just for the
    pain of it.
     
  18. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    [email protected] (wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > >old foggie masochists
    >
    > Would that be a masochist in a low-lying cloud then???

    Masochists whose brains have become addled due to the repeated blows.

    --
    Dave...
     
  19. Stan Cox

    Stan Cox Guest

    "NC" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    <snip>
    > "Velvet" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > I have a san marco rolls classic sat here doing nothing. It's for
    blokes,
    > > obviously, ......make me a sensible offer ..........
    >
    > Thank you for the offer. I'll bear it in mind if I decide I need a second example.
    >
    > NC
    >
    >
    IMHO the best saddle there is. Not expensive and very comfortable. Quite a few pros still ride them
    even though they are not light or fancy. All the best

    Stan Cox
     
  20. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    "NC" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Smudger" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "NC" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > Alternative recommendations for saddles for light (10st4) and tall
    > (6ft1)
    > > > riders on traditional drop-bar tourer would be appreciated.
    >
    > > I always found the Selle Italia Turbo a good all round saddle. I am of similar dimensions.
    >
    >
    > Thanks, I'll give it some consideration. Some other Selle Italia models were on my possible list,
    > unfortunately they tended towards the expensive (Max Flite Genuine Gel for instance, where the
    > tiny amount of integral suspension sounded attractive).
    >
    >
    >
    > Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Selle San Marco Rolls, for sure.
    >
    > Possible.. I have one on a MTB (sacrilege?) with a USE suspension post under it. I found it lacked
    > a little give on the touring bike with a
    ridged
    > post. Might be worth swapping back to see if my views have changed.
    >
    > "Velvet" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > I have a san marco rolls classic sat here doing nothing. It's for
    blokes,
    > > obviously, ......make me a sensible offer ..........
    >
    > Thank you for the offer. I'll bear it in mind if I decide I need a second example.
    >
    > NC
    >
    >

    LOL, look - if you're going to cut and paste my replies to posts into a reply to a post *after*
    mine, at least do it so I don't look completely daft, ta :p The post I replied to made no mention
    of you already owning a rolls classic...

    Velvet
     
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