Good bike for long distances?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Guaps, Jun 10, 2007.

  1. Guaps

    Guaps New Member

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    Short version:
    I'm looking for a bike that will be comfortable for long distances (70+ miles at a time) for about $2,000. Ideas? I'm open to buying used.

    Longer version:
    I'm looking to buy a bike. I've been riding a bike I picked up used for $250 for about 10 months now - it's a Scattante (Performance Bike) aluminum w/ carbon fork. I like riding long distances, but with this bike I can feel every tiny bump in the road, and I'm looking for something a little more forgiving for long distances. I've finally saved up some cash to go buy a better bike. What do you guys/gals suggest? I've got about $2K and I'd buy a used bike if that's a good option.

    Thanks!
     
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  2. bobbyOCR

    bobbyOCR New Member

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  3. Guaps

    Guaps New Member

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    Interesting you brought up the Bottecchia. I was looking at that bike yesterday. I even considered that same idea (buying it for the components only), but I wasn't sure what I could get for the frame. Seems like a great deal though. Why do you say to sell the frame? Is it that bad?

    Thanks for the Pedalforce link. I've never heard it. Problem is, the next major ride I'm training for is a 200 mile ride in September. So I'd like to get the bike in the next couple weeks so I can put some time in before the ride.

    Awesome ideas. I may go this route even if i can't get the bike in time.
     
  4. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    For $2000, there are a lot of great bikes from the big brands available. Mail-order bikes can be certainly be cheaper, but the advice, fitting, and support after the sale is worth a lot for someone buying their first "serious" roadbike, IMO.

    I'd visit a few LBS and do some test riding in your price range so you can make judgements for yourself. Most brands now make a "long-distance" road bike of some sort, set up with a shorter top tube and smaller seat-to-stem drop than you'd get on a typical road-race frame. The long-distance model should also have a relaxed geometry, with stable steering so you can relax on long twisty descents, or go no-hands whenever you want to stretch or sit up and drink. Wouldn't worry about frame materials or weight at all, but would pick the bike you feel most comfortable on.

    Most of the ride difference is going to be in tires and pressures anyway, so have the LBS to inflate tires to a standard (ie, 100 psi) before riding. Get ready for a lot of hype about "all-day comfort", but just ignore all that marketing stuff and get out for some good test rides. Bet you'll find the right bike, and learn a bunch in the process.
     
  5. Lionfish

    Lionfish New Member

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    http://www.cadillacbicycles.com/road_rle18.html

    Amazon for $799.00 with free shipping. I absolutely love this bike. Shimano 105 & FSA gossamer crankset. Carbon fiber forks, seatstay & seatpost. Very smooth, fast & comfortable. The warranty dept is fantastic. The rear hub (shimanos fault) began to have a VERY minor freewheel issue & Cadillac sent me a complete rear wheel w/tire the day after my e-mail to them at no charge.

    I've ridden a Trek 2200 with Ultegra since then & all I can say is sorry to my friend who spent $1800.00 for an equal bike. Yes it is Ultegra vs. 105 but I am hardpressed to notice a thousand dollar difference......as neither can he. Lifetime frame warranty & you cannot beat it for the dough!!!

    I highly encourage anyone to check out this bike....And No, I do not work with or for Cadillac bicycles.
     
  6. rdk

    rdk New Member

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    Try these:

    Giant OCR C1: carbon/Ultegra
    Cannondale Synapse Carbon 105 /Ultegra depending on budget
    Specialized Roubaix: lots of choice
    Look 555: super cool bike ridden by super cool riders (btw I've got one)
     
  7. bobbyOCR

    bobbyOCR New Member

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    It isn't a great frame, but it has excellent components for cheap. You can hardly buy the groupset for that much. If I were going to build up a race bike from scratch, I'd get one of those, sell the frame and buy another SL01 frameset because they are comfortable road-rockets. If I were to build up a bike for comfort, I'd do the same but with a Pedal Force fusion frame (sexy, but maybe get the components of them) cause it is a pure lust object, but I wouldn't race it. In your case, you couldn't go wrong with even a QS2, but look around and find geometry that fits you. I think this would be the way to go because you can get the exact frame you want and build it up with top quality components for pretty cheap.
     
  8. Powerful Pete

    Powerful Pete New Member

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    I second others who suggest that you should go to your LBS to get the proper fit and advice, even if you have to pay a bit more for it. Remember that frame geometry, wheelsets, bike fit and tire pressure will all heavily influence the ride quality on your bike.

    You may also want to consider the Bianchi C2C frames, which 'push' the whole long distance comfort angle (disclaimer: I have never ridden one of these, but they look cool). :)
     
  9. Crankyfeet

    Crankyfeet New Member

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    I bought a Specialized Roubaix Comp 8 weeks ago from LBS for US$2000. The all-carbon frame (inc. vibration dampening Zertz inserts in the forks and seat stays) with a slightly longer wheel base is designed for a smooth ride and I must say that this has been my experience so far. The best thing about carbon as a material is that they can make the frame directionally stiff in the areas required for response and performance, but can make it more forgiving in the directions that increase comfort. Give it a trial if you can. This bike frame will mix it with the best in races IMHO.

    You can search for other reviews on it (try roadbikereview.com) to get independent verification.
     
  10. gfspencer

    gfspencer New Member

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    Being that I am just getting back into road bikes I couldn't agree more. dhk2 is exactly right IMHO. I just bought a new bike. I could have gotten it cheaper through mail-order but I went to my local bike store. The owner of the store took an hour and a half to fit me . . . and it is almost perfect. I have one small problem and he is going to work on that when I take the bike in for the 250 mile tune up. You cannot beat a good fit!!
     
  11. blueturtle241

    blueturtle241 New Member

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    for long rides, buy a roubaix
     
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