Good bike for starting off



E

em

Guest
Hi,

I just pulled my mountain bike out of long-term storage. I never really rode
it a lot but I'm motivated to do so now. (Doc says I have to lose some
weight before surgery.) Its a nice bike, I guess, but it feels like its
harder to ride on the road than it really should be. Its got those big
knobby tires, I don't care too much for the gear ratios, and I really don't
like for the posture -- my neck and lower back have been getting kind of
sore.

Is a road bike really much better to ride on the road? I'm not going to be
taking day-long bike rides any time soon. I would like to work up to an hour
a day of reasonably intense up and down hill riding.

Thanks!!

Mike
 
em wrote:

> Hi,
>
> I just pulled my mountain bike out of long-term storage. I never really
> rode it a lot but I'm motivated to do so now. (Doc says I have to lose
> some weight before surgery.) Its a nice bike, I guess, but it feels like
> its harder to ride on the road than it really should be. Its got those
> big knobby tires,


You can easily replace them with some big slick tires. You will love
those.

> I don't care too much for the gear ratios,


What's wrong with them? Not going fast enough on descents? ;)

> and I really don't like for the posture -- my neck and lower back have
> been getting kind of sore.


Some of that may be due to not really being used to riding. If that is
the case, it will go away.

But perhaps you should be visiting a bike shop where they can have a look
at your posture. Because your bike may well be adjustable to suit you and
your riding style better.

For instance, a straight mountain bike handlebar gives good control on
tehcnical trails, but it stinks for doing much else. So your bike shop
may want to suggest curved bars, or "butterfly" bars. And perhaps throw
in an adjustable handlebar stem. A slightly more upright position may
make all the difference.

> Is a road bike really much better to ride on the road?


What everybody here calls a road bike is really a road *racing* bike.
Light, strong, agressive geometry, tine little saddles. They are indeed
better (that is, faster) for riding races. But for your purpose, any bike
will do.

> I'm not going to be taking day-long bike rides any time soon. I would
> like to work up to an hour a day of reasonably intense up and down hill
> riding.


I have read (here? bikeforums?) that three hours of light training may
help lose weight better than one hour of intense training. I do not
remember the exact argument, just that it seemed to make sense.

Either way, your climbing up and down the hills is going to make your
legs very strong. This will happen before you know it.
 
On Nov 1, 1:53 am, "em" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I just pulled my mountain bike out of long-term storage. I never really rode
> it a lot but I'm motivated to do so now. (Doc says I have to lose some
> weight before surgery.) Its a nice bike, I guess, but it feels like its
> harder to ride on the road than it really should be. Its got those big
> knobby tires, I don't care too much for the gear ratios, and I really don't
> like for the posture -- my neck and lower back have been getting kind of
> sore.
>
> Is a road bike really much better to ride on the road? I'm not going to be
> taking day-long bike rides any time soon. I would like to work up to an hour
> a day of reasonably intense up and down hill riding.
>
> Thanks!!
>
> Mike


Only advice I can give is don't try to do to much to soon.
 
"em" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Hi,
>
> I just pulled my mountain bike out of long-term storage. I never really
> rode it a lot but I'm motivated to do so now. (Doc says I have to lose
> some weight before surgery.) Its a nice bike, I guess, but it feels like
> its harder to ride on the road than it really should be. Its got those big
> knobby tires, I don't care too much for the gear ratios, and I really
> don't like for the posture -- my neck and lower back have been getting
> kind of sore.
>
> Is a road bike really much better to ride on the road? I'm not going to be
> taking day-long bike rides any time soon. I would like to work up to an
> hour a day of reasonably intense up and down hill riding.
>
> Thanks!!
>
> Mike


Road bikes are easier to ride on the road.
Knobby tires and suspension both suck away
pedaling efficiency, straight handlebars don't offer
any real hand placement options.

All around road bikes are not necessarily racers
though it can be hard to find one in a bike shop.

Neck and lower back pain can indicate that the handlebars are too low,
especially as one gets older.

I held off for a year debating the same thing,
should I put slicks on my mountain bike, etc?
Then I got a road bike. No comparison.
If you are going to ride, get a road bike.
If this is a temporary exercise thing do what you can to raise the bars for
now.

JP
 
em wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I just pulled my mountain bike out of long-term storage. I never really
> rode it a lot but I'm motivated to do so now. (Doc says I have to lose
> some weight before surgery.) Its a nice bike, I guess, but it feels like
> its harder to ride on the road than it really should be. Its got those
> big knobby tires, I don't care too much for the gear ratios, and I
> really don't like for the posture -- my neck and lower back have been
> getting kind of sore.


As others have pointed out, the neck and lower back soreness could be
addressed by having a proper fitting done, first by getting the bar
height right, then the seat height. When you first got this bike, did
the shop adjust it specifically for you, or did you assemble it
yourself?

Also, as others have pointed out, some of the soreness may just be
because you've started riding again and are working out muscles that
haven't been active. It's still worth a visit to an LBS to have the
bike fit checked-out.

As for the knobby tires, it's true that what works best off the pavement
won't be best on the pavement. The first thing I'd suggest is checking
the tire pressure frequently, and inflating the tires to the maximum
pressure when riding on pavement. This might make a big difference
by itself. Otherwise, you can get a set of "slick" tires for $40 or
so and swap them on yourself (if you can repair a flat, you can swap
your tires) and you may be really surprised the difference that makes.

A road bike will let you ride faster/farther on pavement, absolutely.
However, you're looking at an hour a day, I don't think you should
complicate your life more than you need to. A road bike will let you
go farther/faster/longer but that doesn't sound like what you're looking
for right now.

Dana
 
On Nov 1, 1:53 am, "em" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I just pulled my mountain bike out of long-term storage. I never really rode
> it a lot but I'm motivated to do so now. (Doc says I have to lose some
> weight before surgery.) Its a nice bike, I guess, but it feels like its
> harder to ride on the road than it really should be. Its got those big
> knobby tires, I don't care too much for the gear ratios, and I really don't
> like for the posture -- my neck and lower back have been getting kind of
> sore.
>
> Is a road bike really much better to ride on the road? I'm not going to be
> taking day-long bike rides any time soon. I would like to work up to an hour
> a day of reasonably intense up and down hill riding.
>
> Thanks!!
>
> Mike


http://www.rei.com/product/629508
http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=2311&subcategory_ID=5425

or just start fresh with a good basic bike:

http://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/bikes/07_bikes/commuter1.html
 
JP wrote:
>
>
> Road bikes are easier to ride on the road.
> Knobby tires and suspension both suck away
> pedaling efficiency, straight handlebars don't offer
> any real hand placement options.
>
> All around road bikes are not necessarily racers
> though it can be hard to find one in a bike shop.
>
> Neck and lower back pain can indicate that the handlebars are too low,
> especially as one gets older.
>
> I held off for a year debating the same thing,
> should I put slicks on my mountain bike, etc?
> Then I got a road bike. No comparison.
> If you are going to ride, get a road bike.
> If this is a temporary exercise thing do what you can to raise the bars for
> now.
>
>


Great advice. Make sure that cycling is what you want to do before
making a big $$$ investment. You can do a lot with the bike you have,
most likely, for not very much money.

The road vs mtn bike contrasts for me inspired me go all road. Road
bikes are lighter, so easier to get up to speed, more options for hand
positions and generally have good gears for me. The road bike
"negatives" of a hard saddle and rougher ride are not a big deal to me.
There are some options in between, called hybrids, etc. Do your
homework and check them all out before you buy anything. What you have
may be quite suitable for a long time. You can also find bike rental
places and/or borrow road bikes to see if you like them.

If your old bike has been sitting around and you're not a mechanic,
consider getting it cleaned up and lubed at a local shop. Often this
can make your old ride quite tolerable while you are deciding things.
Good luck.
 
em wrote:

> Is a road bike really much better to ride on the road?


Hmm. Consider what you wrote. Of course a road bike is better for
riding on the road. Mountain bikes, with their knobby tires,
suspensions, flat bars, etc., are meant for riding on trails. All that
stuff makes trail riding more comfortable, and easier. But it just gets
in the way on the road. Suspensions are no help on the road, and are
heavy. Knobby tires really slow you down on the road compared to smooth
ones. Everything special about the design of a mountain bike is either
just unnecessary on the road, or is a real impediment.

On the other hand, a road bike will not help your back. If the mountain
bike feels like you are too bent over, a road bike would be even more
so. Consider these options:

Hybrid bikes are better on the road than mountain bikes, and they have
the upright bars (not just flat ones) that would be easier on your back.
they are not as good on the road as a road bike, though. They are a
compromise between road and mountain design, and fall short on both
ends. Hybrids are best for smoothish trails.

A road bike with the bars adjusted rather high, above the seat level,
might also work for you. It would have all of the advantages of a road
bike, and, if you get fit properly to the bike (very important) should
be good for your body as well.

--

David L. Johnson

When you are up to your ass in alligators, it's hard to remember that
your initial objective was to drain the swamp.
-- LBJ
 
On Wed, 31 Oct 2007 23:53:51 -0700, em wrote:

> I just pulled my mountain bike out of long-term storage. I never really
> rode it a lot but I'm motivated to do so now. (Doc says I have to lose
> some weight before surgery.) Its a nice bike, I guess, but it feels like
> its harder to ride on the road than it really should be. Its got those
> big knobby tires, I don't care too much for the gear ratios, and I
> really don't like for the posture -- my neck and lower back have been
> getting kind of sore.
>
> Is a road bike really much better to ride on the road? I'm not going to
> be taking day-long bike rides any time soon. I would like to work up to
> an hour a day of reasonably intense up and down hill riding.


The best bike for starting off is the one you already have!

If your neck and lower back are sore, you're probably too hunched over,
and need to raise your handlebars.

Some soreness after not riding for awhile is normal. But if it doesn't go
away after a few rides, then you need to address the fit issue. A
good bike shop can help you with this. You may need a new stem or
extender to raise your bars enough, etc.

Replacing your knobbies with a good set of slicks will make a world of
difference in pedaling effort. You'll feel like you can ride two gears
higher.

If you're finding it difficult to pedal up steep hills, then stick with
the mountain bike for now. Road bike gearing is taller, with smaller gaps
between gears. Of course you can put taller or lower gearing on any bike.

It wouldn't hurt to go to a bike shop and try a few different bikes though.

Most people are more comfortable on mountain bikes or hybrids at first,
but find road bikes more comfortable later as they become fitter and
faster. Drop bars do give more hand positions for long rides, but the
aerodynamics don't come into play until you can comfortably maintain
speeds over 15 MPH. Until then, a mountain bike with appropriate tires
and gearing is just as fast.

Finally, keeping your hamstrings and lower back stretched will help a lot
with your lower back soreness. Stretch before riding if you can, but
you'll make the most progress after riding, when your muscles are
thoroughly warm. Work on it between rides too.

Matt O.
 
On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 13:26:52 +0000, JP wrote:

> "em" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...


>> Is a road bike really much better to ride on the road? I'm not going to
>> be taking day-long bike rides any time soon. I would like to work up to
>> an hour a day of reasonably intense up and down hill riding.


> Road bikes are easier to ride on the road. Knobby tires and suspension
> both suck away pedaling efficiency,


Tires do make a huge difference, but the power-sucking effect of
suspension is greatly overblown. Though world class mountain bikers do
use lockouts, many of them don't, and it doesn't slow them down any.

Personally, I don't find there's any difference, except when sprinting out
of the saddle, which I rarely do anyway.

I'm perfectly comfortable on club road rides on my mountain bike up to
about 18 MPH on the flats, 16 MPH average over hill and dale. After that
I get dropped. But it's not the suspension holding me back. It's the
draggy tires, the gappy gearing, and the poor aerodynamics. On long rides
I suffer from the lack of hand positions too.

Matt O.
 
On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 11:20:51 +0000, nmp wrote:

> I have read (here? bikeforums?) that three hours of light training may
> help lose weight better than one hour of intense training. I do not
> remember the exact argument, just that it seemed to make sense.


This is actually true. LSD (long, slow, distance) is better for building
a base of fitness and burning fat. Thus the importance of being
comfortable on your bike!

Matt O.
 
Matt O'Toole wrote:
> ...
>
> Tires do make a huge difference, but the power-sucking effect of
> suspension is greatly overblown. Though world class mountain bikers do
> use lockouts, many of them don't, and it doesn't slow them down any.
>
> Personally, I don't find there's any difference, except when sprinting out
> of the saddle, which I rarely do anyway.
>
> I'm perfectly comfortable on club road rides on my mountain bike up to
> about 18 MPH on the flats, 16 MPH average over hill and dale. After that
> I get dropped. But it's not the suspension holding me back. It's the
> draggy tires, the gappy gearing, and the poor aerodynamics. On long rides
> I suffer from the lack of hand positions too.
>
>


I believe that the physics of the two give you a little more weight on
the front end of a road bike which, for me, makes it more stable. That
is the only other thing that occurred to me after I wrote my earlier note.

I don't remember whether the OP mentioned that he had suspension or not.
Some people love it, others don't mind it, but I didn't feel that I
needed suspension at all on my mountain bike the short time I had it
mainly because I ride on the road all the time. I didn't bother locking
it out as I was transitioning to road bikes anyway. I would probably
enjoy riding a mountain bike with no suspension, if I had one, but I
don't have one at the moment.
 
On Nov 1, 9:40 am, landotter <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Nov 1, 1:53 am, "em" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
> > Hi,

>
> > I just pulled my mountain bike out of long-term storage. I never really rode
> > it a lot but I'm motivated to do so now. (Doc says I have to lose some
> > weight before surgery.) Its a nice bike, I guess, but it feels like its
> > harder to ride on the road than it really should be. Its got those big
> > knobby tires, I don't care too much for the gear ratios, and I really don't
> > like for the posture -- my neck and lower back have been getting kind of
> > sore.

>
> > Is a road bike really much better to ride on the road? I'm not going to be
> > taking day-long bike rides any time soon. I would like to work up to an hour
> > a day of reasonably intense up and down hill riding.

>
> > Thanks!!

>
> > Mike

>
> http://www.rei.com/product/629508ht...ke.com/shop/profile.cfm?SKU=2311&subcategory_...
>
> or just start fresh with a good basic bike:
>
> http://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/bikes/07_bikes/commuter1.html


That Jamis is such a nice, sensible bike for commuting. And, a good
deal for under $300. But, will it sell, or will the Wannabe Snobs
denigrate it as a "fred bike"? (After all, every real Wannabe knows a
commuter should have a plastic fork, drop bars, a ten speed freehub
and low spoke count wheels. Oh, and a fanciful name; "Commuter 1.0" is
so utilitarian.)
 
On Nov 1, 5:42 pm, Ozark Bicycle
<[email protected]> wrote:
> On Nov 1, 9:40 am, landotter <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
> > On Nov 1, 1:53 am, "em" <[email protected]> wrote:

>
> > > Hi,

>
> > > I just pulled my mountain bike out of long-term storage. I never really rode
> > > it a lot but I'm motivated to do so now. (Doc says I have to lose some
> > > weight before surgery.) Its a nice bike, I guess, but it feels like its
> > > harder to ride on the road than it really should be. Its got those big
> > > knobby tires, I don't care too much for the gear ratios, and I really don't
> > > like for the posture -- my neck and lower back have been getting kind of
> > > sore.

>
> > > Is a road bike really much better to ride on the road? I'm not going to be
> > > taking day-long bike rides any time soon. I would like to work up to an hour
> > > a day of reasonably intense up and down hill riding.

>
> > > Thanks!!

>
> > > Mike

>
> >http://www.rei.com/product/629508http://www.performancebike.com/shop/......

>
> > or just start fresh with a good basic bike:

>
> >http://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/bikes/07_bikes/commuter1.html

>
> That Jamis is such a nice, sensible bike for commuting. And, a good
> deal for under $300. But, will it sell, or will the Wannabe Snobs
> denigrate it as a "fred bike"? (After all, every real Wannabe knows a
> commuter should have a plastic fork, drop bars, a ten speed freehub
> and low spoke count wheels. Oh, and a fanciful name; "Commuter 1.0" is
> so utilitarian.)


I'm tellin' ya! Even those luxe comfy handlebars will be derided as
"grandmotherly"! Thing is, that's the sort of bike I recommend or help
build up for folks wanting to start riding again--something stupidly
simple that can be ridden in pretty much whatever clothes you're
wearing right now. They'll ask about where to ride and what distance,
and I'll just tell them to get a rack and bags/basket and fetch
something delicious from the other side of the river. My weakness are
ahi tuna medallions, which require a 15 mile round trip. Exercise? Not
at all, it's just a simple ride to the store.

I do like the simple single ring mit Megarange system. 7 speed is
incredibly non-fussy, and it's linear up or down with no perplexing
2nd set of rings to think about or front derailleur to rub--as they
always do on cheap bikes that click and can't trim.

That Jamis with fenders and a rack is pretty much a modern Raleigh
Sports. Good stuff. People deride such practicality, till they see it
being used. Like when I first decked out my Kona with racks, fenders,
bags, and bungees galore--the LBS guys deemed it fredly--but then I
stopped in on a cold wet day with 30# of detritus in the bags and a
six pack bungeed up front and everybody got all "dude, I need that!"
on me. Even the LBS's owner's wife got in on the game demanding of her
husband, "honey, this is good, you need to sell them like this."
 
landotter wrote:

> http://www.rei.com/product/629508


People who are not familiar with that type of handlebar, please note that
the picture is upside-down.

On a bike, it should look like this:
<http://surlyville.net/harvw/lht/lht-069.jpg>
Or this:
<http://cybrmarc.tripod.com/bike/hbars.jpg>

Minus the mirror, perhaps...

> http://www.performancebike.com/shop/profile.cfm?

SKU=2311&subcategory_ID=5425
>
> or just start fresh with a good basic bike:
>
> http://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/bikes/07_bikes/commuter1.html


That looks like a nice bike and may well be a very good option. But if it
were mine I would throw away the "suspension" seat post. As far out of
sight as possible.
 
>> Is a road bike really much better to ride on the road?
>
> What everybody here calls a road bike is really a road *racing* bike.
> Light, strong, agressive geometry, tine little saddles. They are indeed
> better (that is, faster) for riding races.


Such bikes are preferred by many for just about anything involving
reasonably-well-paved roads and not carrying heavy loads. Rarely are such
bikes used for "racing" but neither are they used inappropriately. If
someone wants to cover longer distances quickly & comfortably, they may be
just the ticket.

But the category of "road" bike has broadened (and, to some extent,
"mellowed") considerably. Using Trek as an example, off of their '08 road
bikes below $1800 are now 3cm taller at the front end (handlebars) than an
off-the-shelf "road" bike of yesteryear (a 5200 or Madone 5.2, for example).
And many allow use of tires up to 32c width. Thus a "road" bike can
accomodate a wider range of riding style (and even rider weight) than was
previously the case. Or maybe not, because traditionally "road" bike simply
meant a bike with drop handlebars, and those have come in many shapes &
sizes for quite some time. It's only recently that some have trailed to
confine it to a very narrow range of machine.

Gearing is another example of "road" bikes that aren't geared (so to speak)
for racing. The number of racers using triple cranks approaches zero, yet
most "road" bikes offer triple chainrings as a standard feature these days.

This is not to say that a touring or commute-oriented bike, or perhaps even
a hybrid, might not be the most-appropriate style of bike for how someone
plans to ride. Such bikes will carry heavier loads, be more stable on bad
pavement, and usually offer a more-upright seating position.

> But for your purpose, any bike
> will do.


In my opinion, the best bike for someone is the one that calls out to them
to go for a ride, every time they go past it in the garage. The bike that
gets them thinking about all the possible places they might go. Basically,
the bike that, for a variety of reasons, gets ridden more. That will be a
different bike for different people, even people in similar situations. It
might be a more expensive bike, it might be less expensive. In some cases,
it can even be because it looks better than another bike. I used to think
that was silly, but I've gotten over that. If there's something about a bike
that motivates someone to ride, great!

--Mike Jacoubowsky
Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReaction.com
Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA


"nmp" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> em wrote:
>
>> Hi,
>>
>> I just pulled my mountain bike out of long-term storage. I never really
>> rode it a lot but I'm motivated to do so now. (Doc says I have to lose
>> some weight before surgery.) Its a nice bike, I guess, but it feels like
>> its harder to ride on the road than it really should be. Its got those
>> big knobby tires,

>
> You can easily replace them with some big slick tires. You will love
> those.
>
>> I don't care too much for the gear ratios,

>
> What's wrong with them? Not going fast enough on descents? ;)
>
>> and I really don't like for the posture -- my neck and lower back have
>> been getting kind of sore.

>
> Some of that may be due to not really being used to riding. If that is
> the case, it will go away.
>
> But perhaps you should be visiting a bike shop where they can have a look
> at your posture. Because your bike may well be adjustable to suit you and
> your riding style better.
>
> For instance, a straight mountain bike handlebar gives good control on
> tehcnical trails, but it stinks for doing much else. So your bike shop
> may want to suggest curved bars, or "butterfly" bars. And perhaps throw
> in an adjustable handlebar stem. A slightly more upright position may
> make all the difference.
>
>> Is a road bike really much better to ride on the road?

>
> What everybody here calls a road bike is really a road *racing* bike.
> Light, strong, agressive geometry, tine little saddles. They are indeed
> better (that is, faster) for riding races. But for your purpose, any bike
> will do.
>
>> I'm not going to be taking day-long bike rides any time soon. I would
>> like to work up to an hour a day of reasonably intense up and down hill
>> riding.

>
> I have read (here? bikeforums?) that three hours of light training may
> help lose weight better than one hour of intense training. I do not
> remember the exact argument, just that it seemed to make sense.
>
> Either way, your climbing up and down the hills is going to make your
> legs very strong. This will happen before you know it.
 
Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:

[..]
>> But for your purpose, any bike will do.

>
> In my opinion, the best bike for someone is the one that calls out to
> them to go for a ride, every time they go past it in the garage.


That is also what I meant with "any bike will do". You don't have to have
a specific type of bicycle to go cycling.
 
Thanks, everyone, for all the comments and suggestions. There are some good
trails to ride around here in Palos Verdes, California. Some really nice
scenery. I'm going to try a few of these before switch out the tires on my
bike. It may be that I enjoy trail riding enough to keep my mountain bike
the way it is and then buy a street bike. Too bad none of these trails are
within reasonable biking distance, I'll have to drive my bike out there,
ride, drive back... -- Mike



"em" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Hi,
>
> I just pulled my mountain bike out of long-term storage. I never really
> rode it a lot but I'm motivated to do so now. (Doc says I have to lose
> some weight before surgery.) Its a nice bike, I guess, but it feels like
> its harder to ride on the road than it really should be. Its got those big
> knobby tires, I don't care too much for the gear ratios, and I really
> don't like for the posture -- my neck and lower back have been getting
> kind of sore.
>
> Is a road bike really much better to ride on the road? I'm not going to be
> taking day-long bike rides any time soon. I would like to work up to an
> hour a day of reasonably intense up and down hill riding.
>
> Thanks!!
>
> Mike
 
"nmp" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
>
> [..]
>>> But for your purpose, any bike will do.

>>
>> In my opinion, the best bike for someone is the one that calls out to
>> them to go for a ride, every time they go past it in the garage.

>
> That is also what I meant with "any bike will do". You don't have to have
> a specific type of bicycle to go cycling.


That's still not quite right. Some may, in fact, *need* a specific type of
bike to motivate them to ride. What we don't know is what type of bike that
will be. The bike that's just hanging around may not have that spark that
encourages someone to ride. Sometimes the bike can be perfectly fine, a
perfect match for the riding opportunities in the area, but it doesn't
matter, it's not new & exciting and has a dull paint job so it just sits,
while a new bike might not. Yeah, sure, people are shallow sometimes.

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
 
Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:

> "nmp" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>> Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
>>
>> [..]
>>>> But for your purpose, any bike will do.
>>>
>>> In my opinion, the best bike for someone is the one that calls out to
>>> them to go for a ride, every time they go past it in the garage.

>>
>> That is also what I meant with "any bike will do". You don't have to
>> have a specific type of bicycle to go cycling.

>
> That's still not quite right. Some may, in fact, *need* a specific type
> of bike to motivate them to ride.


We are not in disagreement in case you thought so. It's perhaps due to my
lousy English skills, to which I will readily confess, that we have this
misunderstanding.

When I say "you don't have to have a specific type" I mean there is no
prescriptive requirement, be-shunned-by-society-if-you-disobey sort of
need to have some type of bicycle to start riding on roads. Literally:
any bike will do. Just pick one you like. You are free.

You don't need that advice. The OP probably does not need that advice.
But I thought I should mention it anyway because there are people who do
think that way.

All the rest of the advice was meant to show the OP some ways how to make
his current bike more comfortable for him. He didn't seem *too* unhappy
with his bike. If a few minor inexpensive modifications would make the
bike really perfect for him, why not?

Or if he finds, after the mods and some riding experience, that he does
want another, well... At least he will have *two* nice bikes ;)