Good bye to sheep



A

Anthony

Guest
Well I've tried diligently to introduce sheep meat to our
diet - I've made leg of lamb, lamb chops, rack of lamb, lamb
curry, you name it. But my conclusion is that meat from the
pig and the cow are easier to prepare and to cook and
generally give better results. Soooooo................Good
bye Dolly.
 
S

Steve Calvin

Guest
Anthony wrote:
> Well I've tried diligently to introduce sheep meat to our
> diet - I've made leg of lamb, lamb chops, rack of lamb,
> lamb curry, you name it. But my conclusion is that meat
> from the pig and the cow are easier to prepare and to cook
> and generally give better results.
> Soooooo................Good bye Dolly.
>
>

Taste better too.. YMMV

--
Steve

Men are from Earth. Women are from Earth. Deal with it.
 
D

Dave Smith

Guest
Anthony wrote:

> Well I've tried diligently to introduce sheep meat to our
> diet - I've made leg of lamb, lamb chops, rack of lamb,
> lamb curry, you name it. But my conclusion is that meat
> from the pig and the cow are easier to prepare and to cook
> and generally give better results.
> Soooooo................Good bye Dolly.

What have you done wrong? I find lamb no more work to
prepare than beef or pork and usually get excellent
results. Leg of lamb is my favourite cut of meat for
roasting, and I would rather have grilled lamb loin chops
than a steak any day.
 
M

Misnomer

Guest
We learned to cook lamb in highschool. It was very good!
Little bit of oregano, basil, garlic ...
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm..... if it wasn't so expensive up here,
Calgary, i would cook it. Roast leg of lamb... goodness
haven't had that since the greek boyfriend .....

as they say ... eat lamb... 10,000 wolves can't be wrong.

take care Liz

Hey! Look what "Anthony" <[email protected]> wrote :

>Well I've tried diligently to introduce sheep meat to our
>diet - I've made leg of lamb, lamb chops, rack of lamb,
>lamb curry, you name it. But my conclusion is that meat
>from the pig and the cow are easier to prepare and to cook
>and generally give better results.
>Soooooo................Good bye Dolly.
 
K

Kathy

Guest
"Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Anthony wrote:
>
> > Well I've tried diligently to introduce sheep meat to
> > our diet - I've
made
> > leg of lamb, lamb chops, rack of lamb, lamb curry, you
> > name it. But my conclusion is that meat from the pig and
> > the cow are easier to prepare
and
> > to cook and generally give better results.
> > Soooooo................Good
bye
> > Dolly.
>

I've been feeling the same way. I always liked lamb but
hadn't seen any in the stores lately. So I bought some from
a local organic farmer. It's fatty, tastes unpleasant, and
stinks up the house when I cook it. But I remember Mom once
saying that when she was a kid and WWII rationing was going
on, one of the neighbors used to stink up the whole
neighborhood cooking mutton. Now I wonder if I bought
rather elderly lamb and it really makes that much
difference. Does anyone here know how to tell if what's for
sale is lamb or mutton?

Kathy
 
A

Anthony

Guest
"Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> What have you done wrong? I find lamb no more work to
> prepare than beef
or
> pork and usually get excellent results. Leg of lamb is my
> favourite cut
of
> meat for roasting, and I would rather have grilled lamb
> loin chops than a steak any day.
>
Just a case of chacun a son gout, I think. From now on I'm
going to have lamb only at restaurants where I know the chef
to be reliable. At home, it's gonna be beef and pork.
 
S

Steve Wertz

Guest
On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 22:35:48 GMT, "Kathy" <[email protected]> wrote:

>Does anyone here know how to tell if what's for sale is
>lamb or mutton?

Sheep/Mutton is inedible. You'd know if you got an old lamb.
It wouldn't be anything like lamb. It's not possible for a
retailer to sell mutton as lamb.

-sw
 
S

Sf

Guest
On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 22:35:48 GMT, "Kathy" <[email protected]>
wrote:

> "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > Anthony wrote:
> >
> > > Well I've tried diligently to introduce sheep meat to
> > > our diet

Be careful... people can actually be allergic to lamb! If
they aren't allergic, it can be the last red meat that "old
people" give up.

> > > - I've made leg of lamb, lamb chops, rack of lamb,
> > > lamb curry, you name it. But my conclusion is that
> > > meat from the pig and the cow are easier to
> > > prepare and to cook and generally give better
> > > results. Soooooo................Good bye Dolly.
> >
>
> I've been feeling the same way. I always liked lamb but
> hadn't seen any in the stores lately. So I bought some
> from a local organic farmer. It's fatty, tastes
> unpleasant, and stinks up the house when I cook it.

You're cooking it (fatty meat) with the heat too high,
that's why it stinks.

> I remember Mom once saying that when she was a kid and
> WWII rationing was going on, one of the neighbors used to
> stink up the whole neighborhood cooking mutton. Now I
> wonder if I bought rather elderly lamb and it really
> makes that much difference. Does anyone here know how to
> tell if what's for sale is lamb or mutton?
>

If you're in the US, we have "Truth in Labeling" here. If
you're not, you're at the whim of your country's laws.

As far as lamb is concerned, I used to hear that any lamb
over 6 months had a mutton flavor, then I heard that
there was a window in the first year where they tasted
funny... after that they tasted fine. Now, I don't know
what to believe.

All I know is that there IS a difference between grass and
grain fed AND that every New Zealand/Australian lamb I've
ever tried tasted like mutton... until last year.

Practice safe eating - always use condiments
 
D

David Hare-Scot

Guest
"Steve Wertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:D[email protected]...
> On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 22:35:48 GMT, "Kathy"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >Does anyone here know how to tell if what's for sale is
> >lamb or mutton?

Lamb is smaller and lighter in colour. When cooked lamb is
"sweeter" and less gamey, and more tender than mutton. Lamb
is good prepared in almost any way including roasting and
grilling (depending on cut) whereas older beasts are better
stewed to tenderise them. The strong flavour of older sheep
meats may require special attention and be less attractive
to those who are used to more bland meats.
>
> Sheep/Mutton is inedible. You'd know if you got an old
> lamb. It wouldn't be anything like lamb. It's not possible
> for a retailer to sell mutton as lamb.
>
> -sw

Mutton is not inedible unless you treat it like it was lamb.
Would you say shin of beef or chuck steak was inedible just
because it is a little chewy when treated like eye fillet?

It is quite possible for an unscrupulous retailer to sell,
or attempt to sell, more aged sheep as lamb. In some places
lamb meat is marked at the abattoir specifically to try to
prevent this substiution. However this is generally to
prevent hogget (which might be called two-tooth) being
confused with lamb not the older mutton, because as you
infer mutton is fairly obviously different once you have
seen them both.

David
 
T

Tim Challenger

Guest
On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 07:41:23 GMT, sf wrote:

> Be careful... people can actually be allergic to lamb! If
> they aren't allergic, it can be the last red meat that
> "old people" give up.

People can be allergic to almost anything. Doh!
--
Tim.

If the human brain were simple enough that we could
understand it, we would be so simple that we couldn't.
 
S

stan

Guest
Anthony <[email protected]> wrote:
> Well I've tried diligently to introduce sheep meat to our
> diet - I've made leg of lamb, lamb chops, rack of lamb,
> lamb curry, you name it. But my conclusion is that meat
> from the pig and the cow are easier to prepare and to cook
> and generally give better results.
> Soooooo................Good bye

To each his own. I don't see how lamb is any more difficult
or easier to cook than any other meat. Lamb chops are one of
my favorites and they are incredibly easy to prepare in a
variety of different ways. I like to sprinkle Penzy's lamb
seasoning blend on lamb chops and pop them under a broiler.
What's difficult about that?
 
S

stan

Guest
Anthony <[email protected]> wrote:
> Well I've tried diligently to introduce sheep meat to our
> diet - I've made leg of lamb, lamb chops, rack of lamb,
> lamb curry, you name it. But my conclusion is that meat
> from the pig and the cow are easier to prepare and to cook
> and generally give better results.
> Soooooo................Good bye

To each his own. I don't see how lamb is any more difficult
or easier to cook than any other meat. Lamb chops are one of
my favorites and they are incredibly easy to prepare in a
variety of different ways. I like to sprinkle Penzy's lamb
seasoning blend on lamb chops and pop them under a broiler.
What's difficult about that?
 
F

Frogleg

Guest
On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 03:22:32 GMT, MisNomer <[email protected]> wrote:

>We learned to cook lamb in highschool. It was very good!
>Little bit of oregano, basil, garlic ...
>mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm..... if it wasn't so expensive up here,
>Calgary, i would cook it. Roast leg of lamb... goodness
>haven't had that since the greek boyfriend .....

I had a Greek (of Greek descent, that is) friend who said he
liked beef because it didn't taste like lamb. :)
 
F

Frogleg

Guest
On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 03:22:32 GMT, MisNomer <[email protected]> wrote:

>We learned to cook lamb in highschool. It was very good!
>Little bit of oregano, basil, garlic ...
>mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm..... if it wasn't so expensive up here,
>Calgary, i would cook it. Roast leg of lamb... goodness
>haven't had that since the greek boyfriend .....

I had a Greek (of Greek descent, that is) friend who said he
liked beef because it didn't taste like lamb. :)
 
D

Darkginger

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Anthony <[email protected]> wrote:
> > Well I've tried diligently to introduce sheep meat to
> > our diet - I've
made
> > leg of lamb, lamb chops, rack of lamb, lamb curry, you
> > name it. But my conclusion is that meat from the pig and
> > the cow are easier to prepare
and
> > to cook and generally give better results.
> > Soooooo................Good
bye
>
> To each his own. I don't see how lamb is any more
> difficult or easier to cook than any other meat. Lamb
> chops are one of my favorites and they are incredibly easy
> to prepare in a variety of different ways. I like to
sprinkle
> Penzy's lamb seasoning blend on lamb chops and pop them
> under a broiler.
What's
> difficult about that?

Nothing at all in my book (apart from getting hold of
Penzey's spices in Ireland - I sometimes use Schwarz Lamb
Seasoning mix on a joint or chops). Lamb is one of my
favourite foods, and living in the west of Ireland, I'm
surrounded by it - on the hoof and in the shops. Right now
we're getting the very early spring lambs - so tender they
melt in the mouth - and nothing strong about the taste at
all. I've got four lamb shanks sitting in the fridge waiting
to be braised in some Guinness tomorrow night - but my
favourite, Greek inspired, way of eating lamb is as follows:

Get a leg joint, and rub half a garlic clove all over it.
Sprinkle on some powdered cinnamon, and sit it on top of
some sprigs of fresh mint in a roasting dish, over which
you've laid a large piece of foil (big enough to bring up
and over the lamb, with a seal at the top). Squish a couple
more garlic cloves, and press on to the outside of the lamb.
Squeeze the juice of a lemon over, then drizzle on some
EVOO. Put sprigs of fresh oregano on each side of the joint,
and pop some on top. Bring the sides of the foil up, and
turn over a few times to seal (so the meat is totally
enclosed). Put into a medium oven, and cook until the meat
is falling off the bone. Then open the foil up, fold it
back, and return the dish to the oven for a further 20 - 30
minutes, until the lamb browns nicely. Best eaten with
freshly made bread, using fingers.

I like lamb cutlets pink, but there's a lot to be said for
really well done lamb, too (much more than can be said for
well done beef, which is an abomination ;)). If I could
choose only one meat to eat, it'd be lamb - but from what I
can tell, lamb in the US is a bit different from what I'm
used to. I like mutton, too, but it's hard to get hold of. I
think of it as a 'gamey' meat - probably a bit of an
acquired taste - it stands up to robust sauces very well -
especially Cumberland sauce, I find.

Are there any areas of the US where lamb is common? I've got
the impression from this NG that it's a bit of a rarity
there, and expensive when you can find it - is this right?

Jo

---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-
virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.614 /
Virus Database: 393 - Release Date: 05/03/04
 
D

Darkginger

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Anthony <[email protected]> wrote:
> > Well I've tried diligently to introduce sheep meat to
> > our diet - I've
made
> > leg of lamb, lamb chops, rack of lamb, lamb curry, you
> > name it. But my conclusion is that meat from the pig and
> > the cow are easier to prepare
and
> > to cook and generally give better results.
> > Soooooo................Good
bye
>
> To each his own. I don't see how lamb is any more
> difficult or easier to cook than any other meat. Lamb
> chops are one of my favorites and they are incredibly easy
> to prepare in a variety of different ways. I like to
sprinkle
> Penzy's lamb seasoning blend on lamb chops and pop them
> under a broiler.
What's
> difficult about that?

Nothing at all in my book (apart from getting hold of
Penzey's spices in Ireland - I sometimes use Schwarz Lamb
Seasoning mix on a joint or chops). Lamb is one of my
favourite foods, and living in the west of Ireland, I'm
surrounded by it - on the hoof and in the shops. Right now
we're getting the very early spring lambs - so tender they
melt in the mouth - and nothing strong about the taste at
all. I've got four lamb shanks sitting in the fridge waiting
to be braised in some Guinness tomorrow night - but my
favourite, Greek inspired, way of eating lamb is as follows:

Get a leg joint, and rub half a garlic clove all over it.
Sprinkle on some powdered cinnamon, and sit it on top of
some sprigs of fresh mint in a roasting dish, over which
you've laid a large piece of foil (big enough to bring up
and over the lamb, with a seal at the top). Squish a couple
more garlic cloves, and press on to the outside of the lamb.
Squeeze the juice of a lemon over, then drizzle on some
EVOO. Put sprigs of fresh oregano on each side of the joint,
and pop some on top. Bring the sides of the foil up, and
turn over a few times to seal (so the meat is totally
enclosed). Put into a medium oven, and cook until the meat
is falling off the bone. Then open the foil up, fold it
back, and return the dish to the oven for a further 20 - 30
minutes, until the lamb browns nicely. Best eaten with
freshly made bread, using fingers.

I like lamb cutlets pink, but there's a lot to be said for
really well done lamb, too (much more than can be said for
well done beef, which is an abomination ;)). If I could
choose only one meat to eat, it'd be lamb - but from what I
can tell, lamb in the US is a bit different from what I'm
used to. I like mutton, too, but it's hard to get hold of. I
think of it as a 'gamey' meat - probably a bit of an
acquired taste - it stands up to robust sauces very well -
especially Cumberland sauce, I find.

Are there any areas of the US where lamb is common? I've got
the impression from this NG that it's a bit of a rarity
there, and expensive when you can find it - is this right?

Jo

---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-
virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.614 /
Virus Database: 393 - Release Date: 05/03/04
 
B

Bronwyn Ferrier

Guest
"Darkginger" <darkging[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > Anthony <[email protected]> wrote:
> > > Well I've tried diligently to introduce sheep meat to
> > > our diet - I've
> made
> > > leg of lamb, lamb chops, rack of lamb, lamb curry, you
> > > name it. But my conclusion is that meat from the pig
> > > and the cow are easier to prepare
> and
> > > to cook and generally give better results.
> > > Soooooo................Good
> bye
> >
> > To each his own. I don't see how lamb is any more
> > difficult or easier to cook than any other meat. Lamb
> > chops are one of my favorites and they are incredibly
> > easy to prepare in a variety of different ways. I
> > like to
> sprinkle
> > Penzy's lamb seasoning blend on lamb chops and pop them
> > under a broiler.
> What's
> > difficult about that?
>
> Nothing at all in my book (apart from getting hold of
> Penzey's spices in Ireland - I sometimes use Schwarz Lamb
> Seasoning mix on a joint or chops). Lamb is one of my
> favourite foods, and living in the west of Ireland, I'm
> surrounded by it - on the hoof and in the shops. Right now
> we're getting the very early spring lambs - so tender they
> melt in the mouth - and nothing strong about the taste at
> all. I've got four lamb shanks sitting in the fridge
> waiting to be braised in some Guinness tomorrow night -
> but my favourite, Greek inspired, way of eating lamb is as
> follows:
>
> Get a leg joint, and rub half a garlic clove all over it.
> Sprinkle on some powdered cinnamon, and sit it on top of
> some sprigs of fresh mint in a roasting dish, over which
> you've laid a large piece of foil (big enough to bring up
> and over the lamb, with a seal at the top). Squish a
> couple more garlic cloves, and press on to the outside of
> the lamb. Squeeze the juice of a lemon over, then drizzle
> on some EVOO. Put sprigs of fresh oregano on each side of
> the joint, and pop some on top. Bring the sides of the
> foil up, and turn over a few times to seal (so the meat is
> totally enclosed). Put into a medium oven, and cook until
> the meat is falling off the bone. Then open the foil up,
> fold it back, and return the dish to the oven for a
> further 20 - 30 minutes, until the lamb browns nicely.
> Best eaten with freshly made bread, using fingers.
>
> I like lamb cutlets pink, but there's a lot to be said for
> really well done lamb, too (much more than can be said for
> well done beef, which is an abomination ;)). If I could
> choose only one meat to eat, it'd be lamb - but from what
> I can tell, lamb in the US is a bit different from what
> I'm used to. I like mutton, too, but it's hard to get hold
> of. I think of it as a 'gamey' meat - probably a bit of an
> acquired taste - it stands up to robust sauces very well -
> especially Cumberland sauce, I find.
>
> Are there any areas of the US where lamb is common? I've
> got the impression from this NG that it's a bit of a
> rarity there, and expensive when you can find it - is
> this right?
>
> Jo
>
> I'm with you Jo!
I live in Australia and love lamb as well as other red
meats. I do agree that lamb in the US of A is different
because alot of it is imported whereas in Ireland and Oz we
have it on our doorstep. I'm going to try your recipe of
lamb in the foil just as soon as I can procure a leg of baa
lamb. It sounds great. Like a pork roast with the meat
falling off the bone, sweet and tender. Greek lamb dishes
are wonderful - now there's a nation that lives off the
sheep's back! I think your recipe is interesting because it
uses mint and oregano rather than rosemary which I tend to
use all the time. I'm visiting the States next month but
I'll stick to beef and pork! Cheers Bronwyn (not Welsh!!)
 
B

Bronwyn Ferrier

Guest
"Darkginger" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > Anthony <[email protected]> wrote:
> > > Well I've tried diligently to introduce sheep meat to
> > > our diet - I've
> made
> > > leg of lamb, lamb chops, rack of lamb, lamb curry, you
> > > name it. But my conclusion is that meat from the pig
> > > and the cow are easier to prepare
> and
> > > to cook and generally give better results.
> > > Soooooo................Good
> bye
> >
> > To each his own. I don't see how lamb is any more
> > difficult or easier to cook than any other meat. Lamb
> > chops are one of my favorites and they are incredibly
> > easy to prepare in a variety of different ways. I
> > like to
> sprinkle
> > Penzy's lamb seasoning blend on lamb chops and pop them
> > under a broiler.
> What's
> > difficult about that?
>
> Nothing at all in my book (apart from getting hold of
> Penzey's spices in Ireland - I sometimes use Schwarz Lamb
> Seasoning mix on a joint or chops). Lamb is one of my
> favourite foods, and living in the west of Ireland, I'm
> surrounded by it - on the hoof and in the shops. Right now
> we're getting the very early spring lambs - so tender they
> melt in the mouth - and nothing strong about the taste at
> all. I've got four lamb shanks sitting in the fridge
> waiting to be braised in some Guinness tomorrow night -
> but my favourite, Greek inspired, way of eating lamb is as
> follows:
>
> Get a leg joint, and rub half a garlic clove all over it.
> Sprinkle on some powdered cinnamon, and sit it on top of
> some sprigs of fresh mint in a roasting dish, over which
> you've laid a large piece of foil (big enough to bring up
> and over the lamb, with a seal at the top). Squish a
> couple more garlic cloves, and press on to the outside of
> the lamb. Squeeze the juice of a lemon over, then drizzle
> on some EVOO. Put sprigs of fresh oregano on each side of
> the joint, and pop some on top. Bring the sides of the
> foil up, and turn over a few times to seal (so the meat is
> totally enclosed). Put into a medium oven, and cook until
> the meat is falling off the bone. Then open the foil up,
> fold it back, and return the dish to the oven for a
> further 20 - 30 minutes, until the lamb browns nicely.
> Best eaten with freshly made bread, using fingers.
>
> I like lamb cutlets pink, but there's a lot to be said for
> really well done lamb, too (much more than can be said for
> well done beef, which is an abomination ;)). If I could
> choose only one meat to eat, it'd be lamb - but from what
> I can tell, lamb in the US is a bit different from what
> I'm used to. I like mutton, too, but it's hard to get hold
> of. I think of it as a 'gamey' meat - probably a bit of an
> acquired taste - it stands up to robust sauces very well -
> especially Cumberland sauce, I find.
>
> Are there any areas of the US where lamb is common? I've
> got the impression from this NG that it's a bit of a
> rarity there, and expensive when you can find it - is
> this right?
>
> Jo
>
> I'm with you Jo!
I live in Australia and love lamb as well as other red
meats. I do agree that lamb in the US of A is different
because alot of it is imported whereas in Ireland and Oz we
have it on our doorstep. I'm going to try your recipe of
lamb in the foil just as soon as I can procure a leg of baa
lamb. It sounds great. Like a pork roast with the meat
falling off the bone, sweet and tender. Greek lamb dishes
are wonderful - now there's a nation that lives off the
sheep's back! I think your recipe is interesting because it
uses mint and oregano rather than rosemary which I tend to
use all the time. I'm visiting the States next month but
I'll stick to beef and pork! Cheers Bronwyn (not Welsh!!)
 
S

Sf

Guest
On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 15:48:22 GMT, Frogleg
<[email protected]> wrote:

> On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 03:22:32 GMT, MisNomer
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >We learned to cook lamb in highschool. It was very good!
> >Little bit of oregano, basil, garlic ...
> >mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm..... if it wasn't so expensive up here,
> >Calgary, i would cook it. Roast leg of lamb... goodness
> >haven't had that since the greek boyfriend .....
>
> I had a Greek (of Greek descent, that is) friend who said
> he liked beef because it didn't taste like lamb. :)

That's a good enough reason. Eating would be boring if
everything tasted the same.

Practice safe eating - always use condiments
 
S

Sf

Guest
On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 15:48:22 GMT, Frogleg
<[email protected]> wrote:

> On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 03:22:32 GMT, MisNomer
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >We learned to cook lamb in highschool. It was very good!
> >Little bit of oregano, basil, garlic ...
> >mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm..... if it wasn't so expensive up here,
> >Calgary, i would cook it. Roast leg of lamb... goodness
> >haven't had that since the greek boyfriend .....
>
> I had a Greek (of Greek descent, that is) friend who said
> he liked beef because it didn't taste like lamb. :)

That's a good enough reason. Eating would be boring if
everything tasted the same.

Practice safe eating - always use condiments