Good carbon handle bars



saso

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Jan 28, 2004
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I am willing to spend up to 300 on carbon bars. Options are Zipp b2, Modolo Curvissima kx, FSA k wing, easton or even the TTT ...

Anyone have any recommendations on a good carbon bar.
 

JuneBug

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Dec 15, 2003
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Originally posted by saso

Anyone have any recommendations on a good carbon bar.

IS this for a time trial bike or is it for an every day bike.??

Carbon is good for that time trial bike. stiff, lite.
But for an every day training bike....it may be dangerous.
Carbon could lead to catestrophic failure. It doesnt crack slow it SNAPS when it goes.
SNAP.
handlebars..well they are a rather critical item on a bike. Seat posts maybe not such a big deal. you can pedal home without a seat post <laugh>
But handlebars.
If you want to save weight and have a forgiving yet strong bar, maybe Titanium. THey give you this 'oh its to flexible, titanium" but I challenge the data to show me that its that significant of a difference.
I have some wonderful titanium bars on my mountain bike. Just aluminum on my road bike and a carbon fork. <cough><uhm>
ok I have a carbon fork.

well its just my opinion. mostly cause everytime I eyeball the Easton handlebars I get the 'no you are not getting those and this is why'' from three different people.
personally the drool factor is good on those. (((just go pick them up at the bike shop. ooooh)))

but is the weight and stiffness really that important or even that significant in those bars?
a lot of this stuff is just hype and drool. Lets see the cold hard data on the differences.
 

dhk

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Sep 1, 2003
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Dangerous? I don't believe FSA, Easton or any other quality maker is going to market a bar that just goes "snap". They wouldn't be in business very long. These things aren't just molded epoxy resin, but a composite of resin and extremely-high tensile strength fabric layers cured under heat and pressure.....to make sure everything stays together even after a crack or other damage starts.

I looked at an Easton bar/stem recently for my new frame, but decided on Ritchey WCS OS; high quality and strength for a lot less money.
 

saso

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Jan 28, 2004
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I also race cars for and guess what guys Carbon is the ****. Its strong as hell light as a feather and looks good ,no corrosion.
 

lokstah

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Sep 30, 2003
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I just bought a 3T More for my new Klein and it's a piece of art. It's not cheap at around $250, but it's stiff as all hell, feather light, and most importantly, more than one friend of mine has commented on how comfy the ergo-bend in the drops feels.

Really, it's very easy on the hands. And the eyes.
 

hwttdz

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Sep 28, 2003
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From a materials point of view, carbon fiber has a fatigue threshold which means if you subject it to a small force an infinite number of times it will not fail. Aluminum however does not have a threshold, so if you put it in front of a fan for long enough the air pushing on it with different amounts of force will eventually cause it to crack, of course it would take thousands of years if not longer. And all handlebars are built to be able to last far longer than one would need to ride them to break them from fatigue.
 

lokstah

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Sep 30, 2003
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Junebug, with much respect intended, I think one area where burden of proof (where "cold hard data" is concerned) is required has to do with the catastrophic failure tendency of carbon components.

I'm not sure how well this general fear is supported by any real data, particularly when you're talking about modern carbon fiber. This much is clear: carbon fiber fails in a different fashion than aluminum, and where massive stresses and crashes are concerned, there are things to look out for. Cracks can't be ignored, for instance, and should be brought to the attention of a qualified expert.

But who's got real data regarding durability and fatigue life? A huge swath of the road bikes sold over the last few years sport carbon seatposts, for instance -- that includes training bikes, cyclocross bikes, and even some mountain bikes. This 3T More is my first carbon handlebar, but I've been riding carbon seatposts for as long as anyone, and so does my girlfriend, and nearly every co-worker and co-rider I hang with.

And I can think of more than a few Pro CycloCross teams that use carbon bars. That's a rough sport, whether your stuff gets replaced every month or not.

Anyways, not to go on forever; I just feel there's a hype factor surrounding the danger of carbon componentry versus lightweight metals -- as much so as there's a hype factor regarding the dream properties of the substance. The truth is probably, as usual, in the middle.
 

saso

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Jan 28, 2004
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One other thing to remember about alloys. The stronger the metal the less they will use to produce the product. Lets take AL for example, the high quality AL is strong so that means they will make a thinner wal and get away with it to save weight. Thats how saving weight on metals work. Chromoly, over steel, 6061 all of the metals are strong but are also VERY BRITTLE like a paper clip that is bent many times. These metals are also cold forged making them stronger/ and ultimately lighter but not nearly as durable as say mild steel that can flex, bend and still mantain its strenght. CArbon on the other hand is new, light and stronger than metal in CERTAIN APPLICATIONS, the reason that its so good is that it can flex and not be brittle. I am yet to see carbon shatter but then again thats only me.
 

drewski

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Oct 20, 2003
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i don't know about failure, but those FSA k-wing bars look pretty sweet!

with all the graphics and stuff they have on the flats, does that mean you don't put tape up there? only on the bends of the bar?

just curious what folks have done. i'm ok w/ my Ritchey WCS OS bars . . . for the moment! ;)
 

lokstah

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Sep 30, 2003
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Drewski, my friends are telling me to jog the tape out towards the shifter hoods on my new 3T More as far as I can, precisely for that reason. Today's carbon bars are so pretty!
 

RBS

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Aug 7, 2003
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lokstah

i also just got a set of tttl more bars and i love them. right now i'm riding them with no tape so that i can set the shifter position. i can't decide how to tape them though. how are yours taped? i;'m thinking of taping only the drops and about 3" above the shifters.

bob
 

tcklyde

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Dec 17, 2003
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I don't think you need to worry about breaking carbon bars in normal riding conditions. What the real problem is, I imagine, is that people over torque them and put too much stress on the material, making it more susceptible to failure.

That, and of course, crashing. Not too many crashes where the bars don't take a pounding. And I don't like the idea of a crash costing $250.
 

JohnO

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Jul 5, 2003
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About a month ago, I picked up a slightly used set of Cinelli RAM bars on ebay for $300. Typically, they're $500 new from discount sources.

These bars are the cat's meow. They're a work of art, they definitely dampen road vibration, and they fit your hands perfectly.

If you're like me and spend most of your time up on the brake hoods, the RAM bars are molded to fit your hands in that position. Very comfortable. Also noticed that while these bars are as stiff during sprinting as any I've ever used, I just don't feel the high frequency road vibration like I used to. I may be a poseur for getting them, but this is one poseur who isn't battling numb hands any more.
 

Provence1971

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Jul 9, 2004
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JohnO said:
About a month ago, I picked up a slightly used set of Cinelli RAM bars on ebay for $300. Typically, they're $500 new from discount sources.

These bars are the cat's meow. They're a work of art, they definitely dampen road vibration, and they fit your hands perfectly.

If you're like me and spend most of your time up on the brake hoods, the RAM bars are molded to fit your hands in that position. Very comfortable. Also noticed that while these bars are as stiff during sprinting as any I've ever used, I just don't feel the high frequency road vibration like I used to. I may be a poseur for getting them, but this is one poseur who isn't battling numb hands any more.

Yes you are a poseur :cool: though i have to say the Cinelli's are the most beautiful bars imaginable, looks like Bernini chiselled them. Italians do know a thing or two about style.

Recently i won a pair of Easton EC90's on E Bay and i'm waiting with baited breath until i get the chance to try them out.