Good commuting pedal?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Gooserider, Feb 12, 2004.

  1. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    I use my road bike to commute to work 20 miles one way. I have to stop and go a bit so I use an SPD
    MTB pedal---Performance Forte. The pedal functions well but I think the platform is too small and I
    get a hot spot about 15 miles in. I have an ancient pair of Look MTB pedals on my MTB which have a
    larger platform and are very comfortable. Is there a pedal I can consider which works with recessed
    cleats but has a larger platform? Thanks....

    Mike
     
    Tags:


  2. Last weekend I took the kids and two of their friends to the Washington State History Museum, and
    while they were doing some sort of computer interactive exhibit, I found a reproduction of a catalog
    from more than a hundred years ago that had bikes and bicycle parts in it. I had a great deal of fun
    leafing through it.

    One of the things they were selling were tubes for $2.50. Compared to everything else in the
    catalog, where the prices have risen tremendously, this price was remarkably close to what one might
    pay today. Then I looked at the fine print -- every tube was sold with a patch kit, and *a pump*.
    There didn't seem to be a way to buy a tube that didn't come with a pump.

    I also really enjoyed looking at all the headlights sold in the catalog. They had quite a selection
    All of them were gas. The top of the line ones were about the same price as the bikes. Spending an
    astronomical amount on lighting seems to be a long standing tradition in cycling.

    They also had a cut-out style seat, made especially for the ladies. "Recommended by doctors" it said
    -- didn't I buy my Serfas Women's RX Saddle http://store.bicyclerevolution.com/serwomrxsad.html)
    based on my physician's recomendation? Man, the more things change, the more they stay the same.

    I'm glad, though, that I don't have to worry about "...the finest wooden rims" on my bike
    these days.

    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato and .net for .com

    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm

    New CD coming out this month! See: http://www.tiferet.net

    "To forgive is to set the prisoner free and then discover the prisoner
    was you."
     
  3. On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 23:31:27 +0000, Gooserider wrote:

    > I use my road bike to commute to work 20 miles one way. I have to stop and go a bit so I use an
    > SPD MTB pedal---Performance Forte. The pedal functions well but I think the platform is too small
    > and I get a hot spot about 15 miles in.

    It's not the pedal, but the shoe. If the sole is stiff enough, then the size of the pedal will
    not matter.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | It doesn't get any easier, you just go faster. --Greg LeMond _`\(,_ | (_)/ (_) |
     
  4. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 23:31:27 GMT, "Gooserider" <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >I use my road bike to commute to work 20 miles one way. I have to stop and go a bit so I use an SPD
    >MTB pedal---Performance Forte. The pedal functions well but I think the platform is too small and I
    >get a hot spot about 15 miles in. I have an ancient pair of Look MTB pedals on my MTB which have a
    >larger platform and are very comfortable. Is there a pedal I can consider which works with recessed
    >cleats but has a larger platform? Thanks....

    You could try moving the cleat back (closer to your heel).

    You may want to try stiffer shoes.

    Or, pedals with big platforms. There's loads of good SPD pedals with big platforms: Shimano: M424,
    M545, M647 Crank Bros: Candy, Mallet Nashbar: "Multi-Purpose Platform Sport Pedal", $30 cheap!
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  5. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> writes:
    > On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 23:31:27 +0000, Gooserider wrote:
    >
    >> I use my road bike to commute to work 20 miles one way. I have to stop and go a bit so I use an
    >> SPD MTB pedal---Performance Forte. The pedal functions well but I think the platform is too small
    >> and I get a hot spot about 15 miles in.
    >
    > It's not the pedal, but the shoe. If the sole is stiff enough, then the size of the pedal will
    > not matter.

    In re: hot spots -- I've got a pair of ordinary street shoes that do the same thing. The right one,
    anyway. On the fleshy part of my sole, right behind the little piggy who had roast beef.

    Slackening the lace a little provides instant relief, as does simply not running the laces through
    the uppermost pair of eyelets.

    I think maybe it's a foot swelling thing -- the instep strains against the taut lace of the shoe,
    and in turn, the foot is pushed downward into the sole. And maybe a high instep (such as I've got)
    exacerbates the problem.

    It's interesting how accounts of hot spots in cycling shoes so often mention how they occur after
    a duration of more comfortable riding. That would seem to indicate something is changing. In a
    word: swelling.

    Anyhow, maybe loosening the shoelace a little is something to experiment with, and see what happens.
    It's cheaper than a new pair of shoes or pedals, anyway.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  6. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 23:31:27 +0000, Gooserider wrote:
    >
    > > I use my road bike to commute to work 20 miles one way. I have to stop
    and
    > > go a bit so I use an SPD MTB pedal---Performance Forte. The pedal
    functions
    > > well but I think the platform is too small and I get a hot spot about 15 miles in.
    >
    > It's not the pedal, but the shoe. If the sole is stiff enough, then the size of the pedal will
    > not matter.

    I appreciate the input, but I wear the exact same shoe (ancient Performance MTB shoe) with both setups---
    I have two pair. I get discomfort with the road bike and not with the MTB.
     
  7. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 01:25:50 GMT, "Claire Petersky"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >at the fine print -- every tube was sold with a patch kit, and *a pump*. There didn't seem to be a
    >way to buy a tube that didn't come with a pump.

    I wonder what type of valve they used; maybe they weren't standardized, so you needed a pump from
    whatever manufacturer made the tube...
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  8. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    anonymous writes:

    >>> I use my road bike to commute to work 20 miles one way. I have to stop and go a bit so I use an
    >>> SPD MTB pedal---Performance Forte. The pedal functions well but I think the platform is too
    >>> small and I get a hot spot about 15 miles in.

    >> It's not the pedal, but the shoe. If the sole is stiff enough, then the size of the pedal will
    >> not matter.

    > I appreciate the input, but I wear the exact same shoe (ancient Performance MTB shoe) with both
    > setups---I have two pair. I get discomfort with the road bike and not with the MTB.

    You didn't say what pedals you use but I think you ought to consider a better shoe. The Shimano SH-
    TO92 has smooth soles, looks more lie a regular sport shoe and doesn't have a pressure point over
    the pedal, the sole bing practically inflexible. I've worn these to work for years with a hilly 25
    mile round trip daily.

    http://tinyurl.com/a822

    Jobst Brandt [email protected]
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > anonymous writes:

    > You didn't say what pedals you use but I think you ought to consider a better shoe. The Shimano
    > SH-TO92 has smooth soles, looks more lie a regular sport shoe and doesn't have a pressure point
    > over the pedal, the sole bing practically inflexible. I've worn these to work for years with a
    > hilly 25 mile round trip daily.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/a822
    >
    > Jobst Brandt [email protected]

    Jobst, what's the sole thickness like on those? I used to wear a pair of Shimano shoes which were
    obviously the precursors to the MO-38:

    http://tinyurl.com/2ch3a

    But then I broke the relatively thin and flexible plastic soles. The cleat was too much for them. My
    Dad, no monster rider, did in his identical pair the same way.

    These days I'm alternating between Axo Vertigo and Blackball shoes, which are a downhill high-ankle
    design and and something similar to the TO92, respectively, but seem to have the same very thick
    plastic sole. I'm also trying to reduce the stress on the sole by running cleat washers between the
    sole and the cleat (these are meant to go between the nut-plate and the sole, inside the shoe).

    Dad's got Vertigos as well,
    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  10. "Gooserider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I use my road bike to commute to work 20 miles one way. I have to stop and go a bit so I use an
    > SPD MTB pedal---Performance Forte. The pedal
    functions
    > well but I think the platform is too small and I get a hot spot about 15 miles in. I have an
    > ancient pair of Look MTB pedals on my MTB which have a larger platform and are very comfortable.
    > Is there a pedal I can consider which works with recessed cleats but has a larger platform?
    > Thanks....
    >
    > Mike
    >

    Try Shimano 424's. They work well for me.

    Mike T. Philadelphia
     
  11. YES! The Shimano PD-646. Basically, this is a wide, platform style pedal, which provides good
    support if your shoes don't, and it has an SPD insert in the center which is sprung so that it stays
    in an easy to engage position.

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=108&subcategory=1078&brand=&sku=10989&storetype=-
    &estoreid=

    I have a pair of these on my ATB, and I think they are the greatest thing for commuting and but the
    muddiest mountain biking since the invention of the clipless pedal itself. Crank Bros also makes a
    version of these incorporating their "EggBeater" clips.

    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/Profile.cfm?SKU=17282

    "May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills!"

    Chris Zacho ~ "Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman"

    Chris'Z Corner http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  12. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Ryan Cousineau writes:

    >> You didn't say what pedals you use but I think you ought to consider a better shoe. The Shimano
    >> SH-TO92 has smooth soles, looks more lie a regular sport shoe and doesn't have a pressure point
    >> over the pedal, the sole bing practically inflexible. I've worn these to work for years with a
    >> hilly 25 mile round trip daily.

    http://tinyurl.com/a822

    > Jobst, what's the sole thickness like on those? I used to wear a pair of Shimano shoes which were
    > obviously the precursors to the MO-38:

    http://tinyurl.com/2ch3a

    I've been using these since they were called SH-TO90 and never measured sole thickness, being
    satisfied with their strength. I don't feel the cleat and haven't had a sole break. My failure mode
    is the sole wearing out at the toe since I use them as walking shoes at work and on tours where I
    don't want to carry dirt into the house with waffle stomper tread that dirt riders prefer.

    > But then I broke the relatively thin and flexible plastic soles. The cleat was too much for them.
    > My Dad, no monster rider, did in his identical pair the same way.

    I put on plenty of high pedal pressure miles and have had no problem.

    > These days I'm alternating between Axo Vertigo and Blackball shoes, which are a downhill high-
    > ankle design and and something similar to the TO92, respectively, but seem to have the same very
    > thick plastic sole. I'm also trying to reduce the stress on the sole by running cleat washers
    > between the sole and the cleat (these are meant to go between the nut-plate and the sole, inside
    > the shoe).

    Unless you need knobby tread on your shoes, I recommend the SH-TO92 that is designed for tri-
    athletes who run in them. The smooth light weight sole is a major point for me.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected]
     
  13. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Ryan Cousineau writes:
    >
    > >> You didn't say what pedals you use but I think you ought to consider a better shoe. The Shimano
    > >> SH-TO92 has smooth soles, looks more lie a regular sport shoe and doesn't have a pressure point
    > >> over the pedal, the sole bing practically inflexible. I've worn these to work for years with a
    > >> hilly 25 mile round trip daily.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/a822
    >
    > > Jobst, what's the sole thickness like on those? I used to wear a pair of Shimano shoes which
    > > were obviously the precursors to the MO-38:
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/2ch3a

    This takes you to the wrong link
    (http://bike.shimano.com/Footwear_Pedals/Footwear/componenttemplate.asp?part number=SH-MO38). The
    correct link http://bike.shimano.com/Footwear_Pedals/footwear/componenttemplate.asp?partnumber=SH-
    T092 takes folks to the excellent Shimano shoe.

    > I've been using these since they were called SH-TO90 and never measured sole thickness, being
    > satisfied with their strength. I don't feel the cleat and haven't had a sole break. My failure
    > mode is the sole wearing out at the toe since I use them as walking shoes at work and on tours
    > where I don't want to carry dirt into the house with waffle stomper tread that dirt riders prefer.
    >
    > > But then I broke the relatively thin and flexible plastic soles. The cleat was too much for
    > > them. My Dad, no monster rider, did in his identical pair the same way.
    >
    > I put on plenty of high pedal pressure miles and have had no problem.
    >
    > > These days I'm alternating between Axo Vertigo and Blackball shoes, which are a downhill high-
    > > ankle design and and something similar to the TO92, respectively, but seem to have the same very
    > > thick plastic sole. I'm also trying to reduce the stress on the sole by running cleat washers
    > > between the sole and the cleat (these are meant to go between the nut-plate and the sole, inside
    > > the shoe).
    >
    > Unless you need knobby tread on your shoes, I recommend the SH-TO92 that is designed for tri-
    > athletes who run in them. The smooth light weight sole is a major point for me.

    Robin Hubert
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > Ryan Cousineau writes:
    >
    > >> You didn't say what pedals you use but I think you ought to consider a better shoe. The Shimano
    > >> SH-TO92 has smooth soles, looks more lie a regular sport shoe and doesn't have a pressure point
    > >> over the pedal, the sole bing practically inflexible. I've worn these to work for years with a
    > >> hilly 25 mile round trip daily.
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/a822
    >
    > > Jobst, what's the sole thickness like on those? I used to wear a pair of Shimano shoes which
    > > were obviously the precursors to the MO-38:
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/2ch3a
    >
    > I've been using these since they were called SH-TO90 and never measured sole thickness, being
    > satisfied with their strength. I don't feel the cleat and haven't had a sole break. My failure
    > mode is the sole wearing out at the toe since I use them as walking shoes at work and on tours
    > where I don't want to carry dirt into the house with waffle stomper tread that dirt riders prefer.
    >
    > > But then I broke the relatively thin and flexible plastic soles. The cleat was too much for
    > > them. My Dad, no monster rider, did in his identical pair the same way.
    >
    > I put on plenty of high pedal pressure miles and have had no problem.
    >
    > > These days I'm alternating between Axo Vertigo and Blackball shoes, which are a downhill high-
    > > ankle design and and something similar to the TO92, respectively, but seem to have the same very
    > > thick plastic sole. I'm also trying to reduce the stress on the sole by running cleat washers
    > > between the sole and the cleat (these are meant to go between the nut-plate and the sole, inside
    > > the shoe).
    >
    > Unless you need knobby tread on your shoes, I recommend the SH-TO92 that is designed for tri-
    > athletes who run in them. The smooth light weight sole is a major point for me.

    It sounds like it might be quite a different shoe from the MO-38 series. Then again, maybe the MOs
    have been upgraded from my orange/brown/blue shoes.

    We'll see how the soles on the Axos (Axoen?) last. A pic of the Blackball:

    http://www.cambriabike.com/SALE/shoes/axo_blackball_mtb_shoe.htm

    I do enough MTBing that it's reasonable to have a dirt option on both shoes. I do a little walking
    in these shoes, but any SPD shoe is better than trying to skate along on Look cleats.

    The Blackball has grippy soft-rubber lugged tread, but I was first attracted to its roadie-style
    looks and reasonable weight. It's a very well-ventilated shoe; I can barely wear it in the 0-15 C
    temperatures we get these days. It's tight to slip into, but feels nice on the foot so far.

    The Vertigos have a much harder tread, maybe plastic. They were downright dangerous on smooth
    surfaces before a few days of riding scuffed the tread a bit. I prize their high-ankle support and
    heavy-duty protection for cooler rides (they're a disappointment there; I have to tape up a lot of
    the venting surfaces), and will do most of my MTBriding in them this year.

    The Axo shoes were extremely competitively priced when I bought them (I paid about US$30 for both
    pairs) so buying them was an easy choice.

    If I break these shoes, I'll probably look into Look-cleated racing shoes, and find a new home for
    the SPD cleats on the bottom of another pair of shoes.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  15. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 00:02:23 -0800, Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >The Vertigos have a much harder tread, maybe plastic. They were downright dangerous on smooth
    >surfaces before a few days of riding scuffed the tread a bit. I prize their high-ankle support and
    >heavy-duty protection for cooler rides (they're a disappointment there; I have to tape up a lot of
    >the venting surfaces), and will do most of my MTBriding in them this year.

    You've gotten my attention. What's this about taping up venting holes? Will my excessively warm,
    sweaty feet find relief that's more socially acceptable than sandals? Will Axo make Vertigos that
    don't look like bicycle shoes, but rather more like work boots, so I can wear them to work too? Tune
    in next week... <G>

    Seriously, is the venting so good that you feel the wind through your socks? And is the ankle
    support sufficient for a heavy sort of dude?
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  16. Papercut

    Papercut Guest

    There are several scanned old bike catalogs around the web from the first quarter of the 20th
    century. If anything, It seems bicycling was much more expensive back then, when prices are adjusted
    for inflation.
     
  17. On 14 Feb 2004 09:20:37 -0800, [email protected] (papercut) wrote:

    >There are several scanned old bike catalogs around the web from the first quarter of the 20th
    >century. If anything, It seems bicycling was much more expensive back then, when prices are
    >adjusted for inflation.

    everything was more expensive back then, when adjusted for inflation, owing to the relative scarcity
    of goods with respect to the population.

    now ther'es just so much production.....
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>,
    Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 14 Feb 2004 00:02:23 -0800, Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >The Vertigos have a much harder tread, maybe plastic. They were downright dangerous on smooth
    > >surfaces before a few days of riding scuffed the tread a bit. I prize their high-ankle support
    > >and heavy-duty protection for cooler rides (they're a disappointment there; I have to tape up a
    > >lot of the venting surfaces), and will do most of my MTBriding in them this year.
    >
    > You've gotten my attention. What's this about taping up venting holes? Will my excessively warm,
    > sweaty feet find relief that's more socially acceptable than sandals? Will Axo make Vertigos that
    > don't look like bicycle shoes, but rather more like work boots, so I can wear them to work too?
    > Tune in next week... <G>
    >
    > Seriously, is the venting so good that you feel the wind through your socks? And is the ankle
    > support sufficient for a heavy sort of dude?
    > --
    > Rick Onanian

    The venting on the Axo Vertigos is such that my feet get cold after half an hour when I ride in 0-5C
    weather. Biting the bullet and bying booties would fix things. That's hardly super-venting; I've
    only owned both pairs since Boxing Day, and the warmest it's been is 12-15C. Also, the Vertigos do
    have a neoprene "sock" ankle cuff, Which I think has more to do with support and chafing than
    warmth. The Blackball shoes are really well ventilated, but I don't know that they're more so than
    many other bike shoes: synthetic leather external "tongue", but underneath that a very open nylon
    mesh which enhances ventilation. Much cooler than the Vertigos.

    The Blackballs are definitely "wind through the socks" shoes. The Vertigos just don't keep my feet
    warm. But both are really designed for Summer use.

    The ankle support on the Vertigos is superb, with plastic armor and a substantial velcro closure.
    They're designed for downhill racing, so they should be more than enough for normal riding. However,
    they don't really look like normal boots. two-strap velcro closure plus velcro ankle flap, and the
    boot is green and black.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>,
    Luigi de Guzman <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 14 Feb 2004 09:20:37 -0800, [email protected] (papercut) wrote:
    >
    > >There are several scanned old bike catalogs around the web from the first quarter of the 20th
    > >century. If anything, It seems bicycling was much more expensive back then, when prices are
    > >adjusted for inflation.
    >
    > everything was more expensive back then, when adjusted for inflation, owing to the relative
    > scarcity of goods with respect to the population.
    >
    > now there's just so much production.....

    Austin Powers put it best: "yay capitalism!"

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  20. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Rick Onanian writes:

    >> The Vertigos have a much harder tread, maybe plastic. They were downright dangerous on smooth
    >> surfaces before a few days of riding scuffed the tread a bit. I prize their high-ankle support
    >> and heavy-duty protection for cooler rides (they're a disappointment there; I have to tape up a
    >> lot of the venting surfaces), and will do most of my MTB riding in them this year.

    > You've gotten my attention. What's this about taping up venting holes? Will my excessively warm,
    > sweaty feet find relief that's more socially acceptable than sandals? Will Axo make Vertigos that
    > don't look like bicycle shoes, but rather more like work boots, so I can wear them to work too?
    > Tune in next week... <G>

    http://tinyurl.com/a822

    These shoes have mesh uppers that vent just about as much as I need. The toe and heel cups are
    leather or some such material, just enough to keep the freezing winds of winter from blowing your
    toes away.

    > Seriously, is the venting so good that you feel the wind through your socks? And is the ankle
    > support sufficient for a heavy sort of dude?

    NO.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected]
     
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