Good complementary exercise to cycling?

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Andrew Swan, Jun 10, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Andrew Swan

    Andrew Swan Guest

    I've noticed that although cycling keeps me reasonably "cardio fit", I am losing general
    flexibility, e.g. when touching my toes. This is despite me stretching my quads, calves, and hammies
    during and after my training rides.

    Also, I'd like to tone my upper body a bit, particularly in the abdominal (i.e. beer gut!) area.

    Lastly, some extra leg strength would come in handy for climbing and sprinting. I'm guessing there's
    more effective ways to get this than just riding lots of hills.

    So what's a good complementary exercise to cycling? A cyclist friend had yoga recommended to him ...
    but even then there are several types. Also there's Pilates, which seems to be very popular right
    now. Would this do what I'm looking for?

    Any advice or suggestions appreciated.

    &roo

    P.S. I'm looking to avoid impact sports such as running.
     
    Tags:


  2. Andrew Price

    Andrew Price Guest

    "Andrew Swan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > So what's a good complementary exercise to cycling? A cyclist friend had yoga recommended to him
    > ... but even then there are several types. Also there's Pilates, which seems to be very popular
    > right now. Would this do what I'm looking for?
    >
    Either yoga or pilates or just regular thorough stretching, properly done, will do a lot to
    complement your cycling - but as with cycling the improvement comes from the constancy in the
    sessions you do - ie it has to become a part of your regular routine (yep, another time trap!)

    Its not so much in the discipline you choose but in the quality of the instructors - they need to
    understand you and work on your flexibility needs progressively and so you understand and get to
    enjoy the process. As with a badly set up bike having the capacity to cause pain or even injury,
    poor instruction has the capacity to do the same.

    Its not just your cycling that will improve - improving your posture and flexibility is a huge
    investment in your later enjoyment of life.

    best, Andrew

    "But riding is my special gift, my chiefest, sole delight; Just ask a wild duck can it swim, a
    wildcat can it fight... I'll ride this here two-wheeled concern, right straight away, at sight." A B
    'Banjo' Patterson - "Mulga Bill" 25 July 1896.
     
  3. Trevor S

    Trevor S Guest

    Andrew Swan <[email protected]> wrote in news:YVgFa.305$um2.7090 @nnrp1.ozemail.com.au:

    <snip>

    > So what's a good complementary exercise to cycling?

    I swim. As to being complimentary or not I am not sure :)

    Trevor S
     
  4. Andrew G

    Andrew G Guest

  5. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Andrew Swan wrote:
    > I've noticed that although cycling keeps me reasonably "cardio fit", I am losing general
    > flexibility, e.g. when touching my toes. This is despite me stretching my quads, calves, and
    > hammies during and after my training rides.

    Sorry Andrew, but if you are already doing plenty of stretching, it sounds like you may just be
    getting older. Putting on any weight? Welcome to the club.

    > Also, I'd like to tone my upper body a bit, particularly in the abdominal (i.e. beer gut!) area.

    Since you are already fit, I would think weights would be the best way to tone the upper body. Thats
    what I do, when I get around to it :) Swimming is very good for upper body, low impact, and gives
    an aerobic workout too. But more bad news, cycling DOES exercise the "beer gut" area.

    > Lastly, some extra leg strength would come in handy for climbing and sprinting. I'm guessing
    > there's more effective ways to get this than just riding lots of hills.

    A stationary bike, with adjustable load, is more effective in that you dont loose time getting
    there, and riding downhill again.

    > So what's a good complementary exercise to cycling? A cyclist friend had yoga recommended to him
    > ... but even then there are several types.

    Yoga!? Thats a religion. A bit like taking up born-again Christianity to improve your singing.

    Also
    > there's Pilates, which seems to be very popular right now. Would this do what I'm looking for?

    Sure, if you want another fad to lighten your wallet. Something a bit more conventional, and
    focussed on the upper body might be more effective. In the end, it has to be something you enjoy,
    and will keep up. I don't know anything as good as cycling :)
     
  6. Megan Webb

    Megan Webb Guest

    Age is not the limiting factor in how flexible you are.Check out http://www.pandf.com.au/ If you can
    get to any of his classes, they are very worthwhile.

    Mike <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Andrew Swan wrote:
    > > I've noticed that although cycling keeps me reasonably "cardio fit", I am losing general
    > > flexibility, e.g. when touching my toes. This is despite me stretching my quads, calves, and
    > > hammies during and after my training rides.
    >
    > Sorry Andrew, but if you are already doing plenty of stretching, it sounds like you may just be
    > getting older. Putting on any weight? Welcome to the club.
    >
    > > Also, I'd like to tone my upper body a bit, particularly in the abdominal (i.e. beer gut!) area.
    >
    > Since you are already fit, I would think weights would be the best way to tone the upper body.
    > Thats what I do, when I get around to it :) Swimming is very good for upper body, low impact, and
    > gives an aerobic workout too. But more bad news, cycling DOES exercise the "beer gut" area.
    >
    > > Lastly, some extra leg strength would come in handy for climbing and sprinting. I'm guessing
    > > there's more effective ways to get this than just riding lots of hills.
    >
    > A stationary bike, with adjustable load, is more effective in that you dont loose time getting
    > there, and riding downhill again.
    >
    > > So what's a good complementary exercise to cycling? A cyclist friend had yoga recommended to him
    > > ... but even then there are several types.
    >
    > Yoga!? Thats a religion. A bit like taking up born-again Christianity to improve your singing.
    >
    > Also
    > > there's Pilates, which seems to be very popular right now. Would this do what I'm looking for?
    >
    > Sure, if you want another fad to lighten your wallet. Something a bit more conventional, and
    > focussed on the upper body might be more effective. In the end, it has to be something you enjoy,
    > and will keep up. I don't know anything as good as cycling :)
     
  7. Ollie

    Ollie Guest

    Mike has clearly never practiced yoga or taken the time to find ot what is. "Mike" <[email protected]>
    wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Andrew Swan wrote:
    > > I've noticed that although cycling keeps me reasonably "cardio fit", I am losing general
    > > flexibility, e.g. when touching my toes. This is despite me stretching my quads, calves, and
    > > hammies during and after my training rides.
    >
    > Sorry Andrew, but if you are already doing plenty of stretching, it sounds like you may just be
    > getting older. Putting on any weight? Welcome to the club.
    >
    > > Also, I'd like to tone my upper body a bit, particularly in the abdominal (i.e. beer gut!) area.
    >
    > Since you are already fit, I would think weights would be the best way to tone the upper body.
    > Thats what I do, when I get around to it :) Swimming is very good for upper body, low impact, and
    > gives an aerobic workout too. But more bad news, cycling DOES exercise the "beer gut" area.
    >
    > > Lastly, some extra leg strength would come in handy for climbing and sprinting. I'm guessing
    > > there's more effective ways to get this than just riding lots of hills.
    >
    > A stationary bike, with adjustable load, is more effective in that you dont loose time getting
    > there, and riding downhill again.
    >
    > > So what's a good complementary exercise to cycling? A cyclist friend had yoga recommended to him
    > > ... but even then there are several types.
    >
    > Yoga!? Thats a religion. A bit like taking up born-again Christianity to improve your singing.
    >
    > Also
    > > there's Pilates, which seems to be very popular right now. Would this do what I'm looking for?
    >
    > Sure, if you want another fad to lighten your wallet. Something a bit more conventional, and
    > focussed on the upper body might be more effective. In the end, it has to be something you enjoy,
    > and will keep up. I don't know anything as good as cycling :)
     
  8. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Ollie wrote:
    > Mike has clearly never practiced yoga or taken the time to find ot what is.

    "Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)" Yoga Yo"ga, n. Skr. y=oga union. A species of
    asceticism among the Hindoos, which consists in a complete abstraction from all worldly objects, by
    which the votary expects to obtain union with the universal spirit, and to acquire superhuman
    faculties.

    Of course, some people will package some exercises and meditation and market it as "yoga". I have
    nothing against either, just the mystic label.
     
  9. Ollie

    Ollie Guest

    Sorry Mike, clearly you have taken the time to find out, at least to some extent, what Yoga is. I
    jumped the gun a little there. I disagree with some of what you said, but but this is not the forum
    to discuss those particular things, as their relevance to cycling is limited. Feel free to email me
    personally if you want to- [email protected] .au To Andrew- I have found both yoga and asana
    (the bending and stretching bit, it's most comon outward manifestation) usefull for mountain biking
    on both a physical and for want of a better phrase ontological levle. It also helps me to keep trim,
    it has a spiritual element to it, but does not require any specific beliefe system to gain benefit
    from. Ollie "Mike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Ollie wrote:
    > > Mike has clearly never practiced yoga or taken the time to find ot what
    is.
    >
    > "Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)" Yoga Yo"ga, n. Skr. y=oga union. A species of
    > asceticism among the Hindoos, which consists in a complete abstraction from all worldly objects,
    > by which the votary expects to obtain union with the universal spirit, and to acquire superhuman
    > faculties.
    >
    >
    > Of course, some people will package some exercises and meditation and market it as "yoga". I have
    > nothing against either, just the mystic label.
     
  10. G

    G Guest

    Andrew Swan <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Lastly, some extra leg strength would come in handy for climbing and sprinting. I'm guessing
    > there's more effective ways to get this than just riding lots of hills.

    Mate, the best excercise for hill climbing is to climb heaps more hills, really! It isn't a power
    sport either, hill climbing needs endurance (I'm assuming you are talking about real hills and not
    short sprinter ones).

    Sprinting is about power so weight training can help.

    GK
     
  11. Andrew Swan

    Andrew Swan Guest

    > To Andrew- I have found both yoga and asana (the bending and stretching bit, it's most common
    > outward manifestation) useful for mountain biking on both a physical and for want of a better
    > phrase ontological level.
    Hmmm - had me running for the Macquarie Dictionary there - mistook it for "oncological" at first,
    quite a different meaning! Since I'm still not clear what you mean, and I'm still considering yoga,
    any chance you could try for a "better phrase"?

    > It also helps me to keep trim,
    I've heard it can be quite physically demanding, not just bending into unfeasible positions but a
    good workout as well.

    > it has a spiritual element to it, but does not require any specific belief system to gain
    > benefit from.
    At the risk of getting off-topic, can you please resolve this apparent paradox? And if I just wanted
    physical benefits, would I have to profess interest in the spiritual side in order to be accepted
    into a class? Are some kinds of yoga more inherently spiritual than others?

    &roo
     
  12. Ollie

    Ollie Guest

    "Andrew Swan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > To Andrew- I have found both yoga and asana (the bending and stretching
    bit,
    > > it's most common outward manifestation) useful for mountain biking on
    both a
    > > physical and for want of a better phrase ontological level.
    > Hmmm - had me running for the Macquarie Dictionary there - mistook it for "oncological" at first,
    > quite a different meaning! Since I'm still not clear what you mean, and I'm still considering
    > yoga, any chance you could try for a "better phrase"?
    What mean is that it has benefited me on a personal levle. I can focus my mind a lot better (I was
    diagnosed as a child with ADD and of several things I have tried yoga is the only thing that that
    has made any difference), I find I have more energy, I a am calmer, more productive, I spend less of
    my mental energy on winging to myself, when I have been practicing regular yoga. In terms of
    mountain biking, I am better equiped to deal with the mental battle of it- being able to remain calm
    in the face of my fear, rather than panic lock up the brakes and slide into the nearest rut, is
    probably the biggest thing. These benefits are not garanteed just by going to yoga a few times. It's
    not instant enlightenment. It requires consistent regular practice with a good teacher.
    > > it has a spiritual element to it, but does not require any specific belief system to gain
    > > benefit from.
    > At the risk of getting off-topic, can you please resolve this apparent paradox?
    A hindu would explain the benefits I have listed above as being due to my having gained greater
    "union with the univesal spirit", to use Mike's words. I don't know wether or not any universal
    spirit actually exists. My explanation is more bilogical. I think it's to do with tension being
    stored in the body, and also a connection I have expereinced between breath and mental state. That's
    an over simplification, but it will have to do.
    >And if I just wanted physical benefits, would I have to profess interest in the spiritual side in
    >order to be accepted into a class?

    Very unlikely.

    >Are some kinds of yoga more inherently spiritual than others?

    I don't know.

    If you interested purely in physical benefits such as fitness and flexibility yoga might not be the
    thing to do, becaus is the teacher is a good one, he/she will have his attention on teaching you
    something that you are notinterested in learning, which would be frustrating for both parties.

    I hope that has left you a little less confused. Ollie
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...