Good Deal?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by NYC XYZ, Jan 23, 2006.

  1. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    http://www.shuttlebike.com/SHUTTLE-BIKE KIT - The Story.htm

    I wrote Shuttle Bike and just thought I should share the info:

    Its pontoons got upgraded to double-chamber pontoons (so -- God forbid!
    -- a puncture in the front of one doesn't lead to total leakage and
    collapse), and it's available until the end of this month for
    US$890.00, freight inclusive!

    Unfortunately, they seem like they only do wire transfers and
    PayPal....

    Does this thing look like it might fit a 'bent -- say an SMGTe??

    But I'd be a little concerned about weight distribution...!

    I'll write 'em again and see.
     
    Tags:


  2. NYC XYZ wrote:
    > http://www.shuttlebike.com/SHUTTLE-BIKE KIT - The Story.htm
    >
    > I wrote Shuttle Bike and just thought I should share the info:
    >
    > Its pontoons got upgraded to double-chamber pontoons (so -- God forbid!
    > -- a puncture in the front of one doesn't lead to total leakage and
    > collapse), and it's available until the end of this month for
    > US$890.00, freight inclusive!
    >
    > Unfortunately, they seem like they only do wire transfers and
    > PayPal....
    >
    > Does this thing look like it might fit a 'bent -- say an SMGTe??
    >
    > But I'd be a little concerned about weight distribution...!
    >
    > I'll write 'em again and see.


    You can buy decent quality "tupperware" type kayaks for less than $890.
    Or more too. They are actually designed for water. Based on
    centuries and centuries and centuries of experience. And are enjoyable
    to use. Easily maneuverable and can be pretty fast too. You get a
    good upper body workout too. Easy to transport if you already have a
    roof top bike rack. Assuming you do not get the very long kayaks. I
    do recommend getting a kayak with a foot controlled rudder. Much
    easier to steer than with the paddle alone.

    The thing you linked to seems pointless.
     
  3. [email protected] wrote:
    > NYC XYZ wrote:
    > > http://www.shuttlebike.com/SHUTTLE-BIKE KIT - The Story.htm
    > >
    > > I wrote Shuttle Bike and just thought I should share the info:
    > >
    > > Its pontoons got upgraded to double-chamber pontoons (so -- God forbid!
    > > -- a puncture in the front of one doesn't lead to total leakage and
    > > collapse), and it's available until the end of this month for
    > > US$890.00, freight inclusive!
    > >
    > > Unfortunately, they seem like they only do wire transfers and
    > > PayPal....
    > >
    > > Does this thing look like it might fit a 'bent -- say an SMGTe??
    > >
    > > But I'd be a little concerned about weight distribution...!
    > >
    > > I'll write 'em again and see.

    >
    > You can buy decent quality "tupperware" type kayaks for less than $890.
    > Or more too. They are actually designed for water. Based on
    > centuries and centuries and centuries of experience. And are enjoyable
    > to use. Easily maneuverable and can be pretty fast too. You get a
    > good upper body workout too. Easy to transport if you already have a
    > roof top bike rack. Assuming you do not get the very long kayaks. I
    > do recommend getting a kayak with a foot controlled rudder. Much
    > easier to steer than with the paddle alone.
    >
    > The thing you linked to seems pointless.


    It doesn't seem pointless to me. The whole shebang packs down into a
    backpack so you can ride out to a lake or something, and go have a
    spin. It is of course, not a substitute for a kayak, but it opens up
    new possibilities for bike "rides".

    Joseph
     
  4. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >
    > You can buy decent quality "tupperware" type kayaks for less than $890.


    Oh, I know that! But who wants tupperware.

    Actually, I've got the Sea Eagle PaddleSki myself -- not tupperware,
    though not high-end, either (and it's an inflatable -- major demerits
    with 'yak purists).

    Now that Hobie Cat Mirage Tandem...woo-hoo!

    > Or more too. They are actually designed for water. Based on
    > centuries and centuries and centuries of experience. And are enjoyable
    > to use. Easily maneuverable and can be pretty fast too. You get a
    > good upper body workout too. Easy to transport if you already have a
    > roof top bike rack. Assuming you do not get the very long kayaks. I
    > do recommend getting a kayak with a foot controlled rudder. Much
    > easier to steer than with the paddle alone.
    >
    > The thing you linked to seems pointless.


    I'm not sure I understand you...this is a great thing to have along on
    a real major self-supported tour, don't you think? Just pump one up
    (by pedaling, no less!) and you cross the water just like that.

    I was actually thinking one might have to carry around a $3K First
    Light 22-lb. folding kayak, but this seems even more ideal!
     
  5. NYC XYZ wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > You can buy decent quality "tupperware" type kayaks for less than $890.

    >
    > Oh, I know that! But who wants tupperware.
    >
    > Actually, I've got the Sea Eagle PaddleSki myself -- not tupperware,
    > though not high-end, either (and it's an inflatable -- major demerits
    > with 'yak purists).
    >
    > Now that Hobie Cat Mirage Tandem...woo-hoo!
    >
    > > Or more too. They are actually designed for water. Based on
    > > centuries and centuries and centuries of experience. And are enjoyable
    > > to use. Easily maneuverable and can be pretty fast too. You get a
    > > good upper body workout too. Easy to transport if you already have a
    > > roof top bike rack. Assuming you do not get the very long kayaks. I
    > > do recommend getting a kayak with a foot controlled rudder. Much
    > > easier to steer than with the paddle alone.
    > >
    > > The thing you linked to seems pointless.

    >
    > I'm not sure I understand you...this is a great thing to have along on
    > a real major self-supported tour, don't you think? Just pump one up
    > (by pedaling, no less!) and you cross the water just like that.


    Why is it everyone on the internet is bicycle touring in the most
    remote parts of the world? But if crossing a body of water, safely and
    easily, with your bike and gear is what you are after, why not just
    take along a small, simple inflatible raft/boat. Smaller packing size
    and lighter than this pedal thing. And folding/collapsible/take apart
    paddles are readily available. Even made of carbon fiber. And the
    inflatible raft/boat would be cheaper too. And more maneuverable
    because you have a paddle to steer with. And simpler since there are
    no moving parts.

    >
    > I was actually thinking one might have to carry around a $3K First
    > Light 22-lb. folding kayak, but this seems even more ideal!


    With a true folding kayak you can use the waterways as a road to
    explore on your remote major bicycle tour. Safely. Folding kayaks
    like the Klepper are built as real kayaks. Just like touring bicycles
    are built for touring with racks and such on them. They can haul heavy
    loads safely. Put your Klepper or other real folding kayak in a BOB
    trailer, along with your gear in the trailer and in panniers, and you
    can go about anywhere, safely. Not so with that paddle thing referred
    to in the link. If you are really going on a real major self-supported
    tour, this would be the way to do it. Not with gimmicky mickey mouse
    stuff.
     
  6. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > Why is it everyone on the internet is bicycle touring in the most
    > remote parts of the world?


    Probably 'cause the typical internet user lives in an urban area?

    But I'm not sure why you ask; I'm afraid I'm only good for local trips!

    > But if crossing a body of water, safely and
    > easily, with your bike and gear is what you are after, why not just
    > take along a small, simple inflatible raft/boat.


    Well, this is much smaller than any inflatable, don't you think? Much
    more compact, too, and would utilize the bike itself -- pedaling seems
    more powerful than paddling!

    > Smaller packing size
    > and lighter than this pedal thing.


    HUH????

    The lightest folding kayak I know of is one of those by First Light of
    Australia -- and even then toting along the bike will be a hassle --
    and that's $3K! I'd still like to own that one day, but there's just
    no competition at US$895, shipped!

    > And folding/collapsible/take apart
    > paddles are readily available. Even made of carbon fiber. And the
    > inflatible raft/boat would be cheaper too. And more maneuverable
    > because you have a paddle to steer with. And simpler since there are
    > no moving parts.


    I love kayaking, but I'm not sure how you argue that any inflatable
    could possibly compete against this Shuttle Bike product.

    It's cheaper, it's more compact, it sets up more quickly, it solves the
    problem of what to do with the bike, which is a
    two-birds-with-one-stone solution because it utilizes the bike and
    cruises faster!

    > With a true folding kayak you can use the waterways as a road to
    > explore on your remote major bicycle tour. Safely. Folding kayaks
    > like the Klepper are built as real kayaks. Just like touring bicycles
    > are built for touring with racks and such on them. They can haul heavy
    > loads safely. Put your Klepper or other real folding kayak in a BOB
    > trailer, along with your gear in the trailer and in panniers, and you
    > can go about anywhere, safely. Not so with that paddle thing referred
    > to in the link.


    I honestly don't understand how you can claim all that -- why drag
    along a BOB trailer when this thing fits in a backpack? And why mount
    a bike across the bow when this Shuttle Bike design incorporates the
    bike into the whole experience? Indeed, it literally extends the
    concept of a bicycle! And it's cheaper, etc.

    You mean you'd prefer toting around a boat while biking and a bike
    while boating??

    > If you are really going on a real major self-supported
    > tour, this would be the way to do it. Not with gimmicky mickey mouse
    > stuff.


    But they've crossed the English Channel with this! Not to mention the
    Messina Straits between Sicily and the Italian mainland, etc.
     
  7. and watch out for the gators!
     
  8. john

    john Guest

    >....used by anyone: you do not have to be either an expert biker or swimmer.....

    Do not have to be an expert swimmer! Surely you jest! The CG height to
    width ratio has to be far worse that any boat around in which one
    expects to stay dry.
    I dearly hope that anyone who sets out on it, is an expert swimmer or
    is wearing a buoyancy device.
    I really don't mind what anyone does, including jumping off bridges
    with or without a parachute, but please don't believe that the device
    pictured in the OP is stable in white caps & wind.

    Good Luck, John
     
  9. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    john wrote:
    > >....used by anyone: you do not have to be either an expert biker or swimmer.....


    You know, googlegroups does this a lot nowadays..."and who is 'john'
    when he's at home?"

    > Do not have to be an expert swimmer! Surely you jest! The CG height to
    > width ratio has to be far worse that any boat around in which one
    > expects to stay dry.


    I'm sure there will be a lot of splashing around, unfortunately, since
    these are City waters we're talking about.

    > I dearly hope that anyone who sets out on it, is an expert swimmer or
    > is wearing a buoyancy device.


    Of course a Class III FD will be worn! Though I do wonder if that can
    "guarantee" safety (undertows, etc.).

    > I really don't mind what anyone does, including jumping off bridges
    > with or without a parachute, but please don't believe that the device
    > pictured in the OP is stable in white caps & wind.


    Well, this is why I'm asking: the company claims that this thing's been
    used to cross the English Channel, the Straits of Messina, etc. I'm
    sure you don't go white-water with it, but those feats sound fairly
    impressive.

    > Good Luck, John


    Erratum:

    1) I'd mistakenly wrote, in an earlier post, that the whole package
    would be lighter than a First Light folding kayak. Actually, the First
    Lights are like ~22 lbs., whereas this kit is ~27 lbs.
     
  10. NYC XYZ wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Why is it everyone on the internet is bicycle touring in the most
    > > remote parts of the world?

    >
    > Probably 'cause the typical internet user lives in an urban area?
    >
    > But I'm not sure why you ask; I'm afraid I'm only good for local trips!
    >
    > > But if crossing a body of water, safely and
    > > easily, with your bike and gear is what you are after, why not just
    > > take along a small, simple inflatible raft/boat.

    >
    > Well, this is much smaller than any inflatable, don't you think? Much
    > more compact, too, and would utilize the bike itself -- pedaling seems
    > more powerful than paddling!
    >
    > > Smaller packing size
    > > and lighter than this pedal thing.

    >
    > HUH????
    >
    > The lightest folding kayak I know of is one of those by First Light of
    > Australia -- and even then toting along the bike will be a hassle --
    > and that's $3K! I'd still like to own that one day, but there's just
    > no competition at US$895, shipped!
    >
    > > And folding/collapsible/take apart
    > > paddles are readily available. Even made of carbon fiber. And the
    > > inflatible raft/boat would be cheaper too. And more maneuverable
    > > because you have a paddle to steer with. And simpler since there are
    > > no moving parts.

    >
    > I love kayaking, but I'm not sure how you argue that any inflatable
    > could possibly compete against this Shuttle Bike product.
    >
    > It's cheaper, it's more compact, it sets up more quickly, it solves the
    > problem of what to do with the bike, which is a
    > two-birds-with-one-stone solution because it utilizes the bike and
    > cruises faster!
    >
    > > With a true folding kayak you can use the waterways as a road to
    > > explore on your remote major bicycle tour. Safely. Folding kayaks
    > > like the Klepper are built as real kayaks. Just like touring bicycles
    > > are built for touring with racks and such on them. They can haul heavy
    > > loads safely. Put your Klepper or other real folding kayak in a BOB
    > > trailer, along with your gear in the trailer and in panniers, and you
    > > can go about anywhere, safely. Not so with that paddle thing referred
    > > to in the link.

    >
    > I honestly don't understand how you can claim all that -- why drag
    > along a BOB trailer when this thing fits in a backpack? And why mount
    > a bike across the bow when this Shuttle Bike design incorporates the
    > bike into the whole experience? Indeed, it literally extends the
    > concept of a bicycle! And it's cheaper, etc.
    >
    > You mean you'd prefer toting around a boat while biking and a bike
    > while boating??
    >
    > > If you are really going on a real major self-supported
    > > tour, this would be the way to do it. Not with gimmicky mickey mouse
    > > stuff.

    >
    > But they've crossed the English Channel with this! Not to mention the
    > Messina Straits between Sicily and the Italian mainland, etc.


    You're mixing up my comments on using a small, simple, cheap, compact
    inflatable raft/boat with using a real take apart kayak.

    With the inflatable, you get a proven boat, shape anyway, that is
    smaller and lighter and simpler and cheaper than your pedaling kit
    thing. To cross bodies of water, or to enjoy on a city lake or calm
    water, a boat would be much better. The inflatable would easily be
    transported in a small backpack.

    http://www.rei.com/category/4501484.htm
    Here are some inflatable rafts from REI. Alpacka rafts are mentioned.
    Alpacka is made by your Feathercraft company. Cheaper than your pedal
    thing by a $100. Less than 5 pounds. 8"x22", smaller than your pedal
    thing. I am sure there are many other inflatable rafts out there too.
    Some a bit bigger to better carry a bike and gear across water.

    With the take apart kayak, you get a proven real boat capable of
    crossing any body of water carrying anything you want to carry. Its
    heavier and bigger than the pedal thing mentioned. But is safe and
    capable. If you were to take this along on a real major journey, you
    could easily ride to a waterway, assemble the kayak, go down or up
    river many miles, and then start the bicycling again. A BOB trailer
    would likely be required to carry the folding kayak. The BOB would
    also carry your other essential gear on a real major journey.
     
  11. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >
    > You're mixing up my comments on using a small, simple, cheap, compact
    > inflatable raft/boat with using a real take apart kayak.


    Indeed, that's true -- in my mind, for the purposes of getting a bike
    over water, they're the same, "functionally" speaking.

    > With the inflatable, you get a proven boat, shape anyway, that is
    > smaller and lighter and simpler and cheaper than your pedaling kit
    > thing. To cross bodies of water, or to enjoy on a city lake or calm
    > water, a boat would be much better. The inflatable would easily be
    > transported in a small backpack.


    But what's more proven than crossing the English Channel?

    And your suggestions seem like they are necessarily slower, as this
    Shuttle Bike kit uses pedaling power. Surely it's a more elegant
    solution to incorporate the very bike into the whole affair than to
    have it simply as "dead weight"??

    > http://www.rei.com/category/4501484.htm
    > Here are some inflatable rafts from REI. Alpacka rafts are mentioned.
    > Alpacka is made by your Feathercraft company.


    No, I said "First Light," from Australia -- but thanks for the link. I
    actually have an inflatable already, the Sea Eagle PaddleSki.
    Unfortunately, that's 60 lbs. -- rolled up!

    > Cheaper than your pedal
    > thing by a $100. Less than 5 pounds. 8"x22", smaller than your pedal
    > thing. I am sure there are many other inflatable rafts out there too.
    > Some a bit bigger to better carry a bike and gear across water.


    You know, I did make a mistake in my earlier post -- the Shuttle Bike
    kit is actually ~27 lbs., so it's heavier than the previous solution
    I'd imagined, a ~22-lb. First Light folding kayak.

    But again, I don't know how you can beat something which by
    incorporating pedaling power into its design performs much faster and
    efficiently.

    > With the take apart kayak, you get a proven real boat capable of
    > crossing any body of water carrying anything you want to carry. Its
    > heavier and bigger than the pedal thing mentioned. But is safe and
    > capable. If you were to take this along on a real major journey, you
    > could easily ride to a waterway, assemble the kayak, go down or up
    > river many miles, and then start the bicycling again. A BOB trailer
    > would likely be required to carry the folding kayak. The BOB would
    > also carry your other essential gear on a real major journey.


    Yeah, but dude! It'll be cumbersome enough mounting a bike across the
    bow -- where will you stow the BOB???

    With the Shuttle Bike kit, the bike is part and parcel of the solution!
    And the solution tucks away when not in use.

    I simply can't imagine carrying around all the gear you suggest just to
    achieve the same thing at a necessarily slower pace.
     
  12. NYC XYZ wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > You're mixing up my comments on using a small, simple, cheap, compact
    > > inflatable raft/boat with using a real take apart kayak.

    >
    > Indeed, that's true -- in my mind, for the purposes of getting a bike
    > over water, they're the same, "functionally" speaking.


    No they are not functionally the same. The take apart kayak is capable
    of any water voyage. Wherever. The small inflatable raft is to cross
    small bodies of water or for pure pleasure on a lake. Your pedal thing
    is not capable of any water voyage. Its a gimmicky thing for sort of
    pleasure use on a lake. Sort of. The only functional equivalency
    between the things mentioned is they all float.


    >
    > > With the inflatable, you get a proven boat, shape anyway, that is
    > > smaller and lighter and simpler and cheaper than your pedaling kit
    > > thing. To cross bodies of water, or to enjoy on a city lake or calm
    > > water, a boat would be much better. The inflatable would easily be
    > > transported in a small backpack.

    >
    > But what's more proven than crossing the English Channel?


    People swim across the English Channel. Long before this pedal thing
    was invented. Swimming is still not a practical or safe or reliable
    method to cross large bodies of water. Or even smaller bodies like
    rivers. Inflatable crafts liek the one I mentioned in the link from
    REI have crossed the English Cahnnel long before your pedal thing was
    invented too.

    >
    > And your suggestions seem like they are necessarily slower, as this
    > Shuttle Bike kit uses pedaling power. Surely it's a more elegant
    > solution to incorporate the very bike into the whole affair than to
    > have it simply as "dead weight"??


    Why do you assume your pedal thing is fast on water? How big is the
    paddle/propeller? The size of the paddle/propeller and how fast it
    turns is what detemines speed. And waterline, etc. of the boat. What
    provides the power is not relevant. A take apart kayak paddle has
    sufficient area to move an inflatable boat at a reasonable pace. Why
    is it elegant to have the bike part of the craft? How many ferry boats
    in the world transporting millions of cars use the cars to power the
    ferry boat? Couldn't the cars all be driven onto rollers and then have
    the car wheels work to turn the ferry propeller? Elegant? James Bond
    movies always have cars that turn into boats or airplanes or gondolas
    that turn into cars. Elegant? I've also seen bikes that have sails
    attached to them. On RAGBRAI of course. Elegant?


    >
    > > http://www.rei.com/category/4501484.htm
    > > Here are some inflatable rafts from REI. Alpacka rafts are mentioned.
    > > Alpacka is made by your Feathercraft company.

    >
    > No, I said "First Light," from Australia -- but thanks for the link. I
    > actually have an inflatable already, the Sea Eagle PaddleSki.
    > Unfortunately, that's 60 lbs. -- rolled up!


    The inflatables I linked to weigh less than 5 pounds. I'd rather carry
    around 5 pounds than the 27 pounds of your pedal thing.


    >
    > > Cheaper than your pedal
    > > thing by a $100. Less than 5 pounds. 8"x22", smaller than your pedal
    > > thing. I am sure there are many other inflatable rafts out there too.
    > > Some a bit bigger to better carry a bike and gear across water.

    >
    > You know, I did make a mistake in my earlier post -- the Shuttle Bike
    > kit is actually ~27 lbs., so it's heavier than the previous solution
    > I'd imagined, a ~22-lb. First Light folding kayak.
    >
    > But again, I don't know how you can beat something which by
    > incorporating pedaling power into its design performs much faster and
    > efficiently.


    Is it faster? How maneuverable is your pedal thing? How safe?


    >
    > > With the take apart kayak, you get a proven real boat capable of
    > > crossing any body of water carrying anything you want to carry. Its
    > > heavier and bigger than the pedal thing mentioned. But is safe and
    > > capable. If you were to take this along on a real major journey, you
    > > could easily ride to a waterway, assemble the kayak, go down or up
    > > river many miles, and then start the bicycling again. A BOB trailer
    > > would likely be required to carry the folding kayak. The BOB would
    > > also carry your other essential gear on a real major journey.

    >
    > Yeah, but dude! It'll be cumbersome enough mounting a bike across the
    > bow -- where will you stow the BOB???


    Make two trips if need be to cross bodies of water. Which is what the
    inflatable would be used for. With a folding kayak, put the bike on
    the bow and the BOB on the stern. Gear inside. Go for miles and miles
    in any direction on the water, safely.

    >
    > With the Shuttle Bike kit, the bike is part and parcel of the solution!
    > And the solution tucks away when not in use.


    And I am suggesting trying to incorporate a bike into a boat is a bad
    idea. Better to keep them separate. Don't end up with an unsafe,
    unmaneuverable floating thing powered by a bike, supposedly. Your
    pedal thing tucks away into a 27 pound backpack. Can you imagine
    carrying another bike on your back while riding your bike? Wow. You
    had better be pulling a BOB to transport your pedal thing. 27 pounds?
    Wow. With my inflatables, they are less than 5 pounds. A loaded
    Camelbak weighs that. Not 27 pounds.

    >
    > I simply can't imagine carrying around all the gear you suggest just to
    > achieve the same thing at a necessarily slower pace.


    The gear I would suggest for simpy crossing bodies of water or
    recreational use is the less than 5 pound inflatable boat. Cheaper,
    safer, lighter, smaller than your 27 pound backpack sized pedal thing.
    The gear I suggest for a true around the world human powered trip would
    be the folding kayak. Same weight as your pedal thing but capable and
    safe for anything. Your pedal thing requires the same gear to
    transport it as a folding kayak because it weighs 27 pounds, as much as
    a stout bicycle. And is the size of a backpack. The size of a large
    rear pannier, or larger.

    As for slow pace, I can kayak fairly quickly. Kayaks are reasonably
    quick. I suspect the folding kayaks are much faster than your pedal
    thing. As well as safe and maneuverable. The inflatable raft is quick
    enough to get across bodies of water or for recreational use on a lake.
    And safe and maneuverable.
     
  13. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >
    > No they are not functionally the same. The take apart kayak is capable
    > of any water voyage. Wherever. The small inflatable raft is to cross
    > small bodies of water or for pure pleasure on a lake. Your pedal thing
    > is not capable of any water voyage. Its a gimmicky thing for sort of
    > pleasure use on a lake. Sort of. The only functional equivalency
    > between the things mentioned is they all float.


    Right, that's what I mean -- sorry if the semantics is getting in the
    way here. Being waterborne for me is enough, in this context.

    > People swim across the English Channel. Long before this pedal thing
    > was invented. Swimming is still not a practical or safe or reliable
    > method to cross large bodies of water. Or even smaller bodies like
    > rivers. Inflatable crafts liek the one I mentioned in the link from
    > REI have crossed the English Cahnnel long before your pedal thing was
    > invented too.


    I know, but this Shuttle Bike kit is easy to pack away once I reach
    land, and by incorporating pedaling power it moves quicker than trying
    to paddle a raft loaded down by a bike that's just laying there!

    > Why do you assume your pedal thing is fast on water? How big is the
    > paddle/propeller? The size of the paddle/propeller and how fast it
    > turns is what detemines speed.


    That too -- but everything else being equal, pedaling will be
    necessarily faster than paddling, correct? That's all I'm getting at
    here.

    > And waterline, etc. of the boat. What
    > provides the power is not relevant.


    No way! Are you serious?? Surely gas power is faster than electric
    power...same with pedal and paddle, no?

    > A take apart kayak paddle has
    > sufficient area to move an inflatable boat at a reasonable pace.


    Sure, but the faster the better, is all I mean.

    > Why
    > is it elegant to have the bike part of the craft?


    'Cause the bike "pays for itself," it's a "paying passenger," and not
    just "dead weight" when on water.

    > How many ferry boats
    > in the world transporting millions of cars use the cars to power the
    > ferry boat? Couldn't the cars all be driven onto rollers and then have
    > the car wheels work to turn the ferry propeller? Elegant?


    HECK YEAH!!!!! Do you have a link to these sorts of inventions, too,
    by any chance?

    > James Bond
    > movies always have cars that turn into boats or airplanes or gondolas
    > that turn into cars. Elegant? I've also seen bikes that have sails
    > attached to them.


    Um, yeah..."elegant" in the engineering, mathematical sense of killing
    two birds with one stone...instead of separate tools, why not a Swiss
    Army Knife?

    > On RAGBRAI of course. Elegant?


    What's RAGBRAI got to do with anything?? You mean the flat plains of
    Iowa?
     
  14. [email protected] wrote:
    > NYC XYZ wrote:
    > > ....
    > > Yeah, but dude! It'll be cumbersome enough mounting a bike across the
    > > bow -- where will you stow the BOB???

    >
    > Make two trips if need be to cross bodies of water. Which is what the
    > inflatable would be used for....


    You have a fox, a goose and a bag of corn... ;)

    --
    Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
     
  15. gotbent

    gotbent Guest

    And a lawyer...
    "Johnny Sunset" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >> NYC XYZ wrote:
    >> > ....
    >> > Yeah, but dude! It'll be cumbersome enough mounting a bike across the
    >> > bow -- where will you stow the BOB???

    >>
    >> Make two trips if need be to cross bodies of water. Which is what the
    >> inflatable would be used for....

    >
    > You have a fox, a goose and a bag of corn... ;)
    >
    > --
    > Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
    >




    ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
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  16. gotbent wrote:

    > "Johnny Sunset" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > [email protected] wrote:
    > >> NYC XYZ wrote:
    > >> > ....
    > >> > Yeah, but dude! It'll be cumbersome enough mounting a bike across the
    > >> > bow -- where will you stow the BOB???
    > >>
    > >> Make two trips if need be to cross bodies of water. Which is what the
    > >> inflatable would be used for....

    > >
    > > You have a fox, a goose and a bag of corn... ;)

    >
    > And a lawyer...


    You can throw the lawyer in the water. ;)

    --
    Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley
     
  17. Johnny Sunset wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > NYC XYZ wrote:
    > > > ....
    > > > Yeah, but dude! It'll be cumbersome enough mounting a bike across the
    > > > bow -- where will you stow the BOB???

    > >
    > > Make two trips if need be to cross bodies of water. Which is what the
    > > inflatable would be used for....

    >
    > You have a fox, a goose and a bag of corn... ;)
    >
    > --
    > Tom Sherman - Fox River Valley


    Simple. 1. Take the goose across. 2. Go back empty. 3. Take the
    fox across. 4. Take the goose back. 5. Take the corn across. 6.
    Go back empty. 7. Take the goose across.

    There are no rules saying you cannot take one of the pieces back and
    forth. This does assume if you leave the goose or fox alone they won't
    run away.
     
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