Good GPS for cycling on a new lond distance route?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by donrhummy, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. leebm

    leebm New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2003
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think one of the etrex Legend or Vista models would meet all of your goals except for price. And it gets more expensive when you add the software to get the detailed maps. Mapping a route and uploading to the GPS in quite simple with the software.

    As for trying them out, it's a bit difficult in a store because the roof blocks the GPS signals. REI is one retailler that carries a number of Garmin and Magellan models.
     


  2. deckard

    deckard New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    Messages:
    74
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have the Garmin 305 edge and it works flawlessly. You can get a great price online, Garmin does have authorized online dealers. The reason I went with the 305 is I already have the NUVI 350 for my car and it had been great. Keep in mind too Garmin has the best fast time to first fix (your starting location) due to them being the first to utilize the SiRF GPS receiver chipset. The HRM, mileage and speed are dead on. There are a lot of other functions you can utilize too. Input personal information, max heart rate, bike weight and so on. When you are done with your rides you upload everthing on the computer. I am using Motion based, which is free and it outlines your routes and stores history of HR, speed, calories, etc. It is well worth the money as far as I am concerned.
     
  3. BtonRider

    BtonRider New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've been using the Edge 305 all season and I'm in love with it. Like the previous post says, you can load in a lot of personal information to give a more personallized training ride.

    It doesn't have preloaded maps though, so it's not like standard GPS units. You can load waypoints (telling you when to turn) and routes using a GPSbable from http://www.marengo-ltd.com/blog/?p=6 With the recent firmware update from Garmin there is now an audible warning when you approach a turn. Loading a route isn't the easiest thing but it's not terrible either.

    Some of the best features (that aren't on most car based models) are elevation profile, heart rate data, cadence data, and software to analyze your ride. Even if you just buy the basic Edge 305 without HR or cadence accessories you can add them later. You can buy the Edge 305 with both HR and Cadence for under $200 if you search the web. If you want more information on the Edge 305, go to http://www.epinions.com/content_228345220740
     
  4. pedalsquares

    pedalsquares New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2006
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    This is why I held off on buying one. Since it's not a powertap, in that respect it's not much more useful than a cheaper HRM. Since it's not exactly GPS, it's not as useful as a dedicated GPS unit. With those and the battery-life issue, there are just too many compromises in one box. I'll wait until the next generation, even if it takes another year or two.
     
  5. BtonRider

    BtonRider New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    0
    While the Edge obviously wasn't designed with navigation in mind, it can be used for it. Check out http://www.bradculberson.com/cc/map.html to make a course and export it to your GPS. I've used mine for navigating 120 mile routes with no problem.

    As for the battery life I agree it's not long enough. Garmin touts a 12 hour battery life and I've had it up to 11 hours without it dieing. It has a lot to do with how hot it is and if you have a bunch of alarms set up. Just being conscious of the battery life will help extend it. The battery monitor usually says the battery is dead after 5-6 hours but I do a century every weekend and I always have plenty of battery life (even if the meter says I don't). When I do the long stuff (11+ hours) I'm very conscious of the battery and I turn it off every minute I'm not on the road (even if it's just a quick water stop). Garmin needs to create a way to recharge the battery on the fly, like you can with cell phones and the little battery packs you can buy at Wal-Mart, or install replaceable batteries so we can carry extras. Until then though, I'm pretty well covered with my Garmin Edge 305. I just have to have a backup for the really long days
     
  6. micjohns

    micjohns New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2004
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm suprised nobody has mentioned the Garmin GPSMAP http://www.garmin.com/products/gpsmap60csx/.

    I think the only dissappointment is the price. The battery life if awsome (2 AA's) and it does street routing so it's great in the car or on the bike. Beeps when you need to turn and all that jazz. I can load routes and track waypoints. I use it a lot to travel in the car but also use it while I'm mountain biking. It fits nicely in the jersey pocket as well. This think is rugged too - I don't know how many times I've dropped it.
     
  7. SCOTTinNJ

    SCOTTinNJ New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have the older 60c that I use on my motorcycle and in my car. I love it. Other than having limited memory, which has now been addressed in the newer models, it's nearly perfect.

    Haven't used in on the bike because I generally know where I'm going and have a Forerunner 201 for when I don't (that hasvery limited navigation capabilities, but will "point" you in the direction of a waypoint or track back along a breadcrumb trail you lay).

    I was thinking of mounting the 60c to my bike using this, but haven't yet. Other than price, it would be a good choice for you given the criteria you were looking for.
     
  8. sogood

    sogood New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2006
    Messages:
    2,148
    Likes Received:
    0
    I second that.

    I have been strapping my Garmin Vista Cx on the stem of my new bike and have so far done around 150km. It works great outdoors with all the basic biking info (speed, compass direction etc). The mapping function is also useful although the auto-routing function's sound alerts are rather quiet for a cyclist. Otherwise I've been keeping track logs of my rides and know exactly how far I've done and the particular route taken. Compared with my friend's fancy cycle computer, the mileage measurements showed around 10% difference (2.5km over a 27km ride). I would trust the GPS's direct measurement more than the cycle computer's.
     
  9. Felt_Rider

    Felt_Rider Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2004
    Messages:
    3,257
    Likes Received:
    27
    I forgot that I made this post until reviewing this thread and saw your suggestion to me to get the 305 instead of the Vista. You were right!!

    Well I first got the Vista and I will continue to use it for other purposes, but I recently got the 305 for my b-day and I love it. Especially being able to upload the data to MotionBased. Perhaps one of the best bike equipment purchases that I have made.
     
Loading...
Loading...