Good Lock?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Saint, Jul 17, 2004.

  1. Saint

    Saint Guest

    Need to buy a decent lock which can I take with me when out riding so I can
    leave my bike in the knowledge that I have at least made an effort to stop
    some little twerp from nicking it.

    Some of the stuff I have seen would give me a hernia if I had to take it
    with me and would just make my road bike twice as heavy, so I need something
    compact and robust, hopefully enough to warrant an insurance company
    endorsement.

    Would ideally like to buy from Wiggle - anyone any experience?

    Cheers

    S
     
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  2. On 2004-07-17, Saint <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Some of the stuff I have seen would give me a hernia if I had to take it
    > with me and would just make my road bike twice as heavy, so I need something
    > compact and robust, hopefully enough to warrant an insurance company
    > endorsement.


    I have an Abus X54, and if I was prone to hernias, I'd have already had
    one. Its a very solid lock (Thatcham Gold for Mopeds or something like
    that), but I think any solid looking D lock will be a deterrant enough.
    The X54 is very well made, and has features to stop the mechanism being
    killed by water ingress in winter and such, but it is really heavy.

    They do a silver rated lightweight one aimed at cyclists which is probably
    80% as strong, just as good as a deterrant (both being off the scale
    for any normal thief), and a lot lighter with hopefuly the same quality.
    I require a 300mm D rather than a shorter one to get between the trike's
    frame and the adjacent lamppost or whatever. Going shorter will shave
    off weight.

    I bought from www.cyclexpress.co.uk who do good prices, and free fast
    delivery, but have limited range. They have the X54, but it will either
    give you a hernia or very strong legs, also the lighter 64 and some
    other cheaper ones. I don't have any experience of these.

    I also carry a thick Kryptonite accessory locking cable for situations where
    the D won't reach a lamppost. I lock the D through frame and wheel, and
    the cable through the D and whatever solid object I find.

    - Richard

    --
    _/_/_/ _/_/_/ _/_/_/ Richard dot Corfield at ntlworld dot com
    _/ _/ _/ _/
    _/_/ _/ _/ Time is a one way street,
    _/ _/ _/_/ _/_/_/ Except in the Twilight Zone.
     
  3. vernon levy

    vernon levy Guest


    > Some of the stuff I have seen would give me a hernia if I had to take it
    > with me and would just make my road bike twice as heavy, so I need

    something
    > compact and robust, hopefully enough to warrant an insurance company
    > endorsement.
    >

    Light weight and theif resistant are mutually exclusive. The more theif
    resistant locks and chains/cables do weigh. a fair bit. You certainly
    wouldn't want to cart around the Thatcham approved chain and lock that I
    secure my bikes with in the garage.
     
  4. Ian Smith

    Ian Smith Guest

    On 17 Jul 2004, Richard Corfield <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 2004-07-17, Saint <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Some of the stuff I have seen would give me a hernia if I had to take it
    > > with me and would just make my road bike twice as heavy, so I need something
    > > compact and robust, hopefully enough to warrant an insurance company
    > > endorsement.

    >
    > I have an Abus X54, and if I was prone to hernias, I'd have already had
    > one. Its a very solid lock


    I second teh vote. It's a good solid lock, and it's not light. I
    don't carry mine round - it lives on teh bike racks where my commuter
    steed gets locked up each day.

    I'd like to point out, incidently, that while Richard and I both have
    Trice locked by Abus X54, with twin lumis (one with a glow-ring),
    occasionally pulling trailers, we are not actually the same person.
    Also, I had mine first - he copied me!

    I think I'll copyright the next thing I do, then sting him for
    royalties.

    > I lock the D through frame and wheel, and
    > the cable through the D and whatever solid object I find.


    The Abus D is just wide enough to fit round the crossover point of the
    trice and go round a vertical pole. That's how I tend to lock up.

    regards, Ian SMith
    --
    |\ /| no .sig
    |o o|
    |/ \|
     
  5. Ian Smith wrote:

    > I'd like to point out, incidently, that while Richard and I both have
    > Trice locked by Abus X54, with twin lumis (one with a glow-ring),
    > occasionally pulling trailers, we are not actually the same person.


    I took mine to the tip today with the recycling box strapped onto the top of
    it. Whilst there I met my parents in their car, and although they left the
    tip before me, I got to our house quicker thanks to the direct off-road
    cycle lane from the tip entrance to the estate I live on.

    I was cycling quite fast, as the heavens had opened, and I was getting
    soaked. The Trice is a wonderful towing machine, not really noticing the
    trailer, even though I was going above the recommended 15mph to avoid
    getting too soaked. It got so dark, I ended up using the Lumi in the
    daytime for the first time.

    > Also, I had mine first - he copied me!


    We prebook the child extension or child trailer as prior art. Fingers
    crossed, we'll have a child to go in it.

    If you also claim to have had chemotherapy then perhaps we are the same
    person, and one of us is being the other one when we're not looking. You're
    welcome to join us on the next charity ride though, which I'll have to
    organise for next year. Current thoughts are to head up to Pately Bridge
    and around that way. I wouldn't know whether to use trikes or upright
    tandem.

    > The Abus D is just wide enough to fit round the crossover point of the
    > trice and go round a vertical pole. That's how I tend to lock up.


    I'd not tried that, but it may be easier at times. Mine goes around the
    vertical bit of the rear triangle, and out sideways to whatever I lock to.
    My cable is the kryptonite 10mm also on the CycleXpress web site. The D
    lock clips neatly onto one of the seat supports when not in use, and tucks
    behind the seat. The coiled cable sits on top of it, so leaving all the
    rack space free.

    I'm now known at work as the one that rides the bike with the pedals where
    the steering wheel is meant to go.

    - Richard

    --
    _/_/_/ _/_/_/ _/_/_/ Richard dot Corfield at ntlworld dot com
    _/ _/ _/ _/
    _/_/ _/ _/ Time is a one way street,
    _/ _/ _/_/ _/_/_/ Except in the Twilight Zone.
     
  6. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    Richard Corfield <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > We prebook the child extension or child trailer as prior art. Fingers
    > crossed, we'll have a child to go in it.


    Best of luck. Hopefully we'll have one soon too - a child trailer that is;
    we got the child to go in it about 7 months ago :)

    Graeme
     
  7. Graeme wrote:

    > Best of luck. Hopefully we'll have one soon too - a child trailer that is;
    > we got the child to go in it about 7 months ago :)


    Congratulations. (S)he must be lovely - a bundle of joy, but hard work.

    - Richard

    --
    _/_/_/ _/_/_/ _/_/_/ Richard dot Corfield at ntlworld dot com
    _/ _/ _/ _/
    _/_/ _/ _/ Time is a one way street,
    _/ _/ _/_/ _/_/_/ Except in the Twilight Zone.
     
  8. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    Richard Corfield <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Congratulations. (S)he must be lovely - a bundle of joy, but hard
    > work.


    Thanks. He is hard work at times, but worth every second, although the
    nappy changing seconds aren't worth quite as much :-/


    Graeme
     
  9. paul

    paul Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Richard Corfield <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > Congratulations. (S)he must be lovely - a bundle of joy, but hard
    > > work.

    >
    > Thanks. He is hard work at times, but worth every second, although the
    > nappy changing seconds aren't worth quite as much :-/
    >
    >
    > Graeme
    >

    you should enjoy him while he is a joy. And at that age, he'll be very
    cheap to run. They get a lot more hardwork and a LOT more expensive.

    still the pride in their achivements is something else :)
    --
    ..paul

    If at first you don't succeed...
    Skydiving is probably not the sport for you.
     
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