Good news and bad news

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Colin Blackburn, May 11, 2004.

  1. The good news is Wessex Trains have drop charges for reserving a bike
    space, the bad news is they have banned non-folders from peak time
    services.



    From:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/3702921.stm


    Bikes banned on peak-time trains

    Taking bicycles on trains during peak hours is to be banned by rail
    operator Wessex Trains.

    The company blames a sharp rise in passenger numbers for the ban, saying
    it has become problematic for them to compete for space with bikes.

    As a compromise Wessex has dropped charges for reserving cycle space
    during non-peak services.

    The order has been imposed on trains arriving in Bristol, Cardiff, Exeter,
    Plymouth and Truro.

    Wessex Trains Managing Director said: "Our peak services into the major
    towns and cities we serve have become very busy and we need to provide a
    balance for the benefit of all passengers."

    Peter Andrews, the director of Bristol-based Life Cycle said: "Getting
    bikes on trains has progressively become more difficult.

    "I can understand why they have imposed this ban when there are a lot of
    people standing, it's pushing it to expect a lot of bikes on the same
    train.

    "We would hope that newer trains, which could have flip-up seats, could
    solve this problem. We are trying to encourage the operators to think
    about doing this."

    The company will continue to allow folding bikes on trains.

    The ban runs between 0700 and 0900, then between 1600 and 1800.
     
    Tags:


  2. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    Colin Blackburn wrote:

    > Peter Andrews, the director of Bristol-based Life Cycle said:


    > "I can understand why they have imposed this ban when there are a lot
    > of people standing, it's pushing it to expect a lot of bikes on the
    > same train.


    Well done Peter, there's commitment for you!

    Why does Wessex Trains persist with cramped, 'sprinter' trains on
    cross-country routes? I'm thinking Portsmouth-Cardiff here -- a route I use
    quite often.
     
  3. On Tue, 11 May 2004 14:28:51 +0100, "Simonb"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Colin Blackburn wrote:
    >
    >> Peter Andrews, the director of Bristol-based Life Cycle said:

    >
    >> "I can understand why they have imposed this ban when there are a lot
    >> of people standing, it's pushing it to expect a lot of bikes on the
    >> same train.

    >
    >Well done Peter, there's commitment for you!
    >
    >Why does Wessex Trains persist with cramped, 'sprinter' trains on
    >cross-country routes? I'm thinking Portsmouth-Cardiff here -- a route I use
    >quite often.
    >


    I also (Portsmouth end; where are you?). The Bristol, Bath to South
    Coast Multi Modal Study recommended all sorts of upgrades to this v.
    busy service. The minimal improvement being the simple increase in the
    size of the trains.

    I just don't get it I'm afraid; Portsmouth to Cardiff is an intercity
    route not a local commuter service so why not run something bigger
    than the two carriage jobs they use at present.

    Unfortunately, until the capacity is increased the bike ban is
    acceptable. (Although, for consistency, they could also ban prams,
    pushchairs, big luggage and wheelchairs).

    Folders are still OK.
     
  4. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Tue, 11 May 2004 18:12:32 +0100 someone who may be "[Not
    Responding]" <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >I just don't get it I'm afraid; Portsmouth to Cardiff is an intercity
    >route not a local commuter service so why not run something bigger
    >than the two carriage jobs they use at present.


    Given the level of leasing costs and the lack of alternative trains,
    what do you suggest?

    I have a suggestion. The four and five coach "Voyager" trains
    currently causing problems on other routes would probably be ideal
    for this line, but that means replacing them with better trains on
    the lines they currently use. There is no money to do this.


    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E
    I will always explain revoked keys, unless the UK government
    prevents me using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  5. Colin Blackburn wrote:

    > The good news is Wessex Trains have drop charges for reserving a bike
    > space, the bad news is they have banned non-folders from peak time
    > services.
    >
    > From:
    >
    > http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/3702921.stm
    >
    > Bikes banned on peak-time trains


    [...]

    > Wessex Trains Managing Director said: "Our peak services into the
    > major towns and cities we serve have become very busy and we need to
    > provide a balance for the benefit of all passengers."


    Interesting use of the word 'all' there.

    --
    Keith Willoughby http://flat222.org/keith/
    "After my experience, I have come to hate war. War settles nothing."
    - Dwight D. Eisenhower
     
  6. On Tue, 11 May 2004 19:15:15 +0100, David Hansen
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue, 11 May 2004 18:12:32 +0100 someone who may be "[Not
    >Responding]" <[email protected]> wrote this:-
    >
    >>I just don't get it I'm afraid; Portsmouth to Cardiff is an intercity
    >>route not a local commuter service so why not run something bigger
    >>than the two carriage jobs they use at present.

    >
    >Given the level of leasing costs and the lack of alternative trains,
    >what do you suggest?


    I'll admit that rail economics is out of my area of expertise. But
    *is* there a shortage of trains nationally? My limited knowledge
    extends to there being new electric trains and diesels for Virgin, new
    electrics for SWT and I think FGW have something shiny as well. What's
    happened to all the old stuff? If it's still around then surely supply
    and demand will take care of leasing rates.

    Maybe all the old stuff has been scrapped or runs on the wrong sort of
    electricity. In which case the TOCs need to raise prices a bit. Last
    time I did Portsmouth -> Bath the advance ticket was less than the
    cost of the petrol alone had I driven. (IIRC: £16 UKP vs 150 miles @
    11p per mile petrol = £16.50 or £25 at a more realistic marginal cost
    of motoring)

    >I have a suggestion. The four and five coach "Voyager" trains
    >currently causing problems on other routes would probably be ideal
    >for this line, but that means replacing them with better trains on
    >the lines they currently use. There is no money to do this.
     
  7. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    [Not Responding] wrote:

    > I also (Portsmouth end; where are you?).


    Southampton.

    I go up to Cardiff and Bath a lot on this service. Having to displace
    passengers in order to park the bike is pretty embarrassing (some of the
    looks you get!). Then again, I have paid extra to carry a bike on and it's
    not my fault there is no real provision for bikes (though sometimes they
    have a cupboard-type-thing for bikes).
     
  8. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    [Not Responding] [email protected]lid opined the following...
    > Maybe all the old stuff has been scrapped or runs on the wrong sort of
    > electricity. In which case the TOCs need to raise prices a bit. Last
    > time I did Portsmouth -> Bath the advance ticket was less than the
    > cost of the petrol alone had I driven. (IIRC: =A316 UKP vs 150 miles @
    > 11p per mile petrol =3D =A316.50 or =A325 at a more realistic marginal co=

    st
    > of motoring)


    For one person travelling from Peterborough (Huntingdon actually but it=20
    doesn't affect the ticket price!) to Edinburgh, the train is cheapest.=20
    When two travel, it is cheaper by road (Even with a YPR). And while I=20
    certainly wouldn't encourage it, if there are *any* works on the track,=20
    the journey can be completed faster by car. For the country that=20
    developed rail travel, we really seem to be struggling with it!

    Jon
     
  9. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    "[Not Responding]" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Unfortunately, until the capacity is increased the bike ban is
    > acceptable. (Although, for consistency, they could also ban prams,
    > pushchairs, big luggage and wheelchairs).
    >
    > Folders are still OK.


    Even when crowded I've never had problems tucking my Brompton in the luggage
    rack at the end ;-)

    Tony
     
  10. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Tue, 11 May 2004 20:11:55 +0100 someone who may be "[Not
    Responding]" <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >What's happened to all the old stuff?


    Most of it is not suitable, for many reasons. One of the reasons is
    that it tends to be slower than the newer trains and as a result the
    timetable would have to be rewritten to take account of the slower
    trains. That is not easy.

    As an example of the difficulties they can face, when the railways
    here did not get the last of the new trains as quickly as expected
    they had to keep some old trains running for a few months. The
    timetable had been rewritten for all new trains, so there was a
    problem as the old trains could not keep to it. The only solution
    was to remove the middle coach, which was the only one with a
    toilet, so the shortened old trains could keep to the timetable.

    >If it's still around then surely supply
    >and demand will take care of leasing rates.


    You didn't believe what the Tories said about rail privatisation did
    you?


    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E
    I will always explain revoked keys, unless the UK government
    prevents me using the RIP Act 2000.
     
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