Good rim for strength and durability on the road?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jacobe Hazzard, Apr 30, 2004.

  1. I am building up what I hope will be a bulletproof track
    bike for city riding. I'm not a heavy guy at all but I want
    to be able to hop curbs and small obstacles and not worry
    about truing very often.

    Since I only weigh 130lbs and the rear wheel will be
    dishless, I figure any 36H rim should be plenty strong, but
    what's the strongest? I'm looking at the Velocity deep V
    right now. Don't much care about weight. Suggestions
    appreciated.
     
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  2. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    What size tires will you run?
    Have you considered Aerohead?
    Is your rear wheel going to be dished or dishless?
    I have had good experiences with plain old Open Pro, FIR EA50, Ambosio Excelence, and Torelli Master rims. They all have eyelets which help spread the load at the spoke bed.
    Whatever you choose, get them built well.
     
  3. Jacobe Hazzard <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Since I only weigh 130lbs and the rear wheel will be
    > dishless, I figure any 36H rim should be plenty strong,
    > but what's the strongest? I'm looking at the Velocity deep
    > V right now. Don't much care about weight. Suggestions
    > appreciated.

    i'm running a 36h velocity deep v on a heavily dished 9sp
    campag chorus rear hub on my cyclocross bike. i weigh 178.
    that wheel takes a lot of abuse. it's a tank. when i bought
    'em the vendor asked me if i was a "big guy" .. heh. i've
    used 'em for midweight touring (rear panniers at ~30 lbs)
    ok. they're fairly narrow and i usually don't run too much
    wider than 28mm (widest i've done is 32mm).

    if you want the strongest they're up there. probably
    overkill for someone who weighs in at 130lbs, but hey .. so
    what. it's fun riding 36h wheels in a world of 16 'specially
    if you're faster. ;-)
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  4. daveornee wrote:
    > Jacobe Hazzard wrote:
    > > I am building up what I hope will be a bulletproof
    > > track bike for
    > city > riding. I'm not a heavy guy at all but I want to
    > be able to hop curbs > and small obstacles and not worry
    > about truing very often. > Since I only weigh 130lbs and
    > the rear wheel will be dishless, I figure > any 36H rim
    > should be plenty strong, but what's the strongest? I'm >
    > looking at the Velocity deep V right now. Don't much
    > care about weight. > Suggestions appreciated.

    > What size tires will you run?

    I am thinking probably in the 28-37mm range, so a 17-19mm
    internal rim width. I just realized the 19mm width given for
    the deep v is measured externaly, so it might be too narrow
    if I choose a wider tire. Why don't they tell you the
    internal widths?

    Have you considered Aerohead? Is your
    > rear wheel going to be dished or dishless?

    Dishless. The aerohead is a bit wider and lighter, but I
    think the deep V would obviously be stronger. That's the
    main concern.

    I have had good
    > experiences with plain old Open Pro, FIR EA50, Ambosio
    > Excelence, and Torelli Master rims. They all have eyelets
    > which help spread the load at the spoke bed. Whatever you
    > choose, get them built well.

    How important are eyelets? I hadn't even thought of them
    really. I'll check out the rims you mentioned. I plan on
    building the wheels myself. So far the only wheels I've
    built from new (as opposed to trued or rebuilt) used Alex
    rims, which so far have held up fine, but don't yet have a
    lot of miles on them.

    Also, (and maybe this is another thread), what might
    be a good choice of spoke gauge? Do I want something
    double-butted?
     
  5. David Reuteler wrote:
    > Jacobe Hazzard <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Since I only weigh 130lbs and the rear wheel will be
    >> dishless, I figure any 36H rim should be plenty strong,
    >> but what's the strongest? I'm looking at the Velocity
    >> deep V right now. Don't much care about weight.
    >> Suggestions appreciated.
    >
    > i'm running a 36h velocity deep v on a heavily dished 9sp
    > campag chorus rear hub on my cyclocross bike. i weigh 178.
    > that wheel takes a lot of abuse. it's a tank. when i
    > bought 'em the vendor asked me if i was a "big guy" ..
    > heh. i've used 'em for midweight touring (rear panniers at
    > ~30 lbs) ok. they're fairly narrow and i usually don't run
    > too much wider than 28mm (widest i've done is 32mm).

    Can you tell me how wide they are internally? I might want
    to run a larger tire than 32mm so this could be an issue.
    Also I'm a bit confused about the color options, there is a
    way to get this rim with no anodizing right?

    > if you want the strongest they're up there. probably
    > overkill for someone who weighs in at 130lbs, but hey ..
    > so what. it's fun riding 36h wheels in a world of 16
    > 'specially if you're faster. ;-)

    Overkill is what I'm looking for. And actually I've never
    seen any fancy 16 or less spoked wheels except on the
    internet. If anyone around here rides on them, they're not
    crossing paths with me on my commutes around town :)
     
  6. Jacobe Hazzard <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Can you tell me how wide they are internally?

    they measure 14mm across the lips (ie, not the larger
    internal distance at the bed -- no caliper). they're almost
    exactly the same as campagnolo shamals and a tad less than a
    campagnolo atlanta 96 if that means anything. they're not
    abnormally narrow for a road rim.

    > I might want to run a larger tire than 32mm so this
    > could be an issue. Also I'm a bit confused about the
    > color options, there is a way to get this rim with no
    > anodizing right?

    yea .. the black at least i know is powdercoated. but some
    of the colours are annodized. i'm not sure how you're
    supposed to know. as per width yea i dunno. they'll take
    32mm ok, not sure about 37 and i don't have anything that
    wide to check for ya.

    >> if you want the strongest they're up there. probably
    >> overkill for someone who weighs in at 130lbs, but hey ..
    >> so what. it's fun riding 36h wheels in a world of 16
    >> 'specially if you're faster. ;-)
    >
    > Overkill is what I'm looking for. And actually I've never
    > seen any fancy 16 or less spoked wheels except on the
    > internet. If anyone around here rides on them, they're not
    > crossing paths with me on my commutes around town :)

    then i'd do 3x 36h deep-v 14/15, brass nipples. that
    basically describes the set i built up over the winter 'cept
    mine are 9sp/dished.
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  7. Jacobe-<< I am building up what I hope will be a bulletproof
    track bike for city riding. I'm not a heavy guy at all but I
    want to be able to hop curbs and small obstacles and not
    worry about truing very often >><BR><BR> << Since I only
    weigh 130lbs and the rear wheel will be dishless, I figure
    any 36H rim should be plenty strong, but what's the
    strongest? I'm looking at the Velocity deep V right now.
    Don't much care about weight. Suggestions appreciated.
    >><BR><BR>

    Deep V would be my choice. Others include velocity Fusion,
    Ritchey Treking rims, for a good, strong, inexpensive rim...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali
    costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  8. dave-<< What size tires will you run? Have you considered
    Aerohead? Is your rear wheel going to be dished or dishless?
    >><BR><BR>

    He said the rer would be same dish left/right..Aeroheads
    would be a little light, IMO, for him beating them around,
    over curbs,etc.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali
    costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  9. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

    Joined:
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    <SNIP>
    I am thinking probably in the 28-37mm range, so a 17-19mm
    internal rim width. I just realized the 19mm width given for
    the deep v is measured externaly, so it might be too narrow
    if I choose a wider tire. Why don't they tell you the
    internal widths?
    <SNIP>
    I would skip the Velocity DeepV and focus on wider rims.
    Ritchey Trekking or Bontrager Fairlane with single eyelets or even better Mavic T519/T520 or their newer A719 with double eyelets.
    Check with the rim manufacturer for appropriate tire widths and inflations to match the actual tires you settle on.
    <SNIP>
    How important are eyelets?
    <SNIP>
    I believe they are important for the following reasons:
    They support the nipple to rim interface with a superior "cradle"
    They reinforce the area around the spoke hole helping distribute the load
    When the eyelet/socket ties the rim walls together it further increases the load bearing areas.
    <SNIP>
    Also, (and maybe this is another thread), what might
    be a good choice of spoke gauge? Do I want something
    double-butted? [/B][/QUOTE]
    Yes, you want double butted spokes and quality plated brass nipples. DT Competition DB 14/15, Sapim DB 14/15, or Wheelsmith DB 14/16 would be good choices.
    If you don't alreay have a copy of "the Bicycle Wheel" by Jobst Brandt, I suggest you read it before you begin. Some libraries carry it and it was available through Avocet.
     
  10. daveornee wrote: <snipped a bunch cause I couldn't follow
    the formatting>

    > I would skip the Velocity DeepV and focus on wider rims.
    > Ritchey Trekking or Bontrager Fairlane with single eyelets
    > or even better Mavic T519/T520 or their newer A719 with
    > double eyelets. Check with the rim manufacturer for
    > appropriate tire widths and inflations to match the actual
    > tires you settle on.

    In my internet searching I came across a recomendation for
    the Bontrager Fairlane for heavy duty road stuff, but I
    couldn't find it on the Bontrager website. I think it may
    be the same as the Maverick, but curiously the only 700c
    36H Maverick rim they list is drilled for presta, and I
    would prefer schraeder. I have often heard people complain
    about rim (and other components) manufacturers websites,
    now I see why.
     
  11. Jacobe Hazzard <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In my internet searching I came across a recomendation for
    > the Bontrager Fairlane for heavy duty road stuff, but I
    > couldn't find it on the Bontrager website.

    blech .. google back through groups on those rims. i pulled
    all the spokes through the eyelets rear, sidewall fun as
    well. quality control issues (don't run true, crazy joints)
    definitely exist. i'll never buy another rim from them. i'll
    stick to velocity for now.

    velocity dyad?
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  12. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    http://www.bontrager.com/roadrims/
    but the Fairlane isn't shown anymore so unless you want to follow a road less traveled, skip that choice.
    I use Bontrager Fairlanes on my fully loaded touring bicycle and have done 7,900 miles with them. The welded joint is ugly, but a little file (acutually Dremel tool) work on the inside and they came out smooth.
    Mine run true with balanced spoke tensions. I haven't had any cracks or eyelet pull through. I am using 36 hole model that I bought at Rivendell. The rear one I use has the offset spoke bed.
    However, I agree with David Reuter about their finish. They are ugly. And I agree with David that Velocity Dyad is worth a look. We are using the Dyad 48 hole version on our road toruing tandem. They are nicely finished, built true with even tesnion, and have handled over 10,000 miles of riding. They don't have eyelets.
    Back to my earlier statement: have them built well.
     
  13. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > Jacobe Hazzard <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Can you tell me how wide they are internally?

    David Reuteler wrote:
    > they measure 14mm across the lips (ie, not the larger
    > internal distance at the bed -- no caliper). they're
    > almost exactly the same as campagnolo shamals and a tad
    > less than a campagnolo atlanta 96 if that means anything.
    > they're not abnormally narrow for a road rim.
    -snip-

    There's also a Dyad touring rin from Velocity that's 22mm
    outside, 19mm inside and 480g, clear anodize only.

    Aeroheads ( and Aerohead OC) are powdercoated in colors,
    anodized clear, grey or black ( all with cut sides) .

    this may help: http://www.yellowjersey.org/velspec.html and
    http://www.yellowjersey.org/velrim.html

    --
    Andrew Muzi www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1
    April, 1971
     
  14. Dianne_1234

    Dianne_1234 Guest

    On Sun, 02 May 2004 14:00:12 GMT, daveornee
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >http://www.bontrager.com/roadrims/ but the Fairlane isn't
    >shown anymore

    A recent Trek 520 touring bikes come with Mavericks now,
    where they used to come with Fairlanes. I guess Trek is
    replacing them.

    In my experience the Maverick is a more durable rim. Similar
    external shape and dimensions, but better alloy.

    >I use Bontrager Fairlanes on my fully loaded touring
    >bicycle and have done 7,900 miles with them. The welded
    >joint is ugly, but a little file (acutually Dremel tool)
    >work on the inside and they came out smooth.

    The Mavericks I've looked at had the same problem, with the
    same solution.

    >Mine run true with balanced spoke tensions. I haven't had
    >any cracks or eyelet pull through. I am using 36 hole model
    >that I bought at Rivendell. The rear one I use has the
    >offset spoke bed. However, I agree with David Reuter about
    >their finish. They are ugly.

    The Mavericks I've seen on 520s have a nicer, smooth silver
    finish. Maybe it's anodized?

    > And I agree with David that Velocity Dyad is worth a look.
    > We are using the Dyad 48 hole version on our road toruing
    > tandem. They are nicely finished, built true with even
    > tesnion, and have handled over 10,000 miles of riding.
    > They don't have eyelets.

    I think Burley tandems use Dyads quite a bit.

    > Back to my earlier statement: have them built well.

    In my experience this makes the most difference.
     
  15. kim belfield

    kim belfield New Member

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    I use Velocity Deep V 36h and think they would be perfect for your use. I slammed into the side of a car at 35km/hr leaving me in hospital for a week, a broken wrist, a destroyed bike but guess what? The Deep V wheels were still true. Given that I am approx. 200lbs I was very impressed. For what you want to do they will last forever.

    Good Luck
     
  16. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    > Jacobe Hazzard wrote:
    > > I am building up what I hope will be a bulletproof
    > > track bike for city riding. I'm not a heavy guy at all
    > > but I want to be able to hop curbs and small obstacles
    > > and not worry about truing very often. Since I only
    > > weigh 130lbs and the rear wheel will be dishless, I
    > > figure any 36H rim should be plenty strong, but what's
    > > the strongest? I'm looking at the Velocity deep V
    > > right now. Don't much care about weight. Suggestions
    > > appreciated.
    >

    Mavic A719, unless you ever plan on using 23mm tires.

    Robin Hubert
     
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