Good thing this guy's wearing a helmet!



Dianne Feinstein writes:

> I guess racing is a little more dangerous than normal bike riding.


http://tinyurl.com/7q7ph

He should have turned his head and broke his neck to get the helmet
between his head and the road. He's sliding on his ear, below the
helmet. As you see the helmet did not hit the ground or it would be
toast (or better said, popcorn).

However, as we all know, it saved his life!

Jobst Brandt
 
[email protected] wrote:
> I guess racing is a little more dangerous than normal bike riding.
>
> http://www.cyclingnews.com/photos.p...5/manhattan_beachgp05/mbgp2005-08-14T09_10_47


Now I understand how I got that scrape on top of my shoulder when I
fell last year. No helmet. I was glad of that, because with the helmet,
I would have received a severe torsion and thus injury, whereas
actually my head received none.

The guy's helmet is not working as designed. The impact is under the
lid, not on it. What a great picture! s
 
[email protected] wrote:
> Dianne Feinstein writes:
>
>> I guess racing is a little more dangerous than normal bike riding.

>
> http://tinyurl.com/7q7ph
>
> He should have turned his head and broke his neck to get the helmet
> between his head and the road. He's sliding on his ear, below the
> helmet. As you see the helmet did not hit the ground or it would be
> toast (or better said, popcorn).
>
> However, as we all know, it saved his life


Click "next photo" two more times.

Bill "denial ain't a river 'round here" S.
 
Bill Sornson writes:

>>> I guess racing is a little more dangerous than normal bike riding.


http://tinyurl.com/7q7ph

>> He should have turned his head and broke his neck to get the helmet
>> between his head and the road. He's sliding on his ear, below the
>> helmet. As you see the helmet did not hit the ground or it would
>> be toast (or better said, popcorn).


>> However, as we all know, it saved his life


> Click "next photo" two more times.


> Bill "denial ain't a river 'round here" S.


I see no deformed helmet in any of the pictures, nor that there was
any helmet impact. Dropping such a helmet from the bicycle causes
more damage than occurred here. I've seen people do that on a ride
inadvertently while messing with a sweat band.

Jobst Brandt
 
"Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote in
message news:[email protected]...
> [email protected] wrote:
>> Dianne Feinstein writes:
>>
>>> I guess racing is a little more dangerous than normal bike riding.

>>
>> http://tinyurl.com/7q7ph
>>
>> He should have turned his head and broke his neck to get the helmet
>> between his head and the road. He's sliding on his ear, below the
>> helmet. As you see the helmet did not hit the ground or it would be
>> toast (or better said, popcorn).
>>
>> However, as we all know, it saved his life

>
> Click "next photo" two more times.
>
> Bill "denial ain't a river 'round here" S.


Yeh, now he's sliding along on his nose. A trip to ENT isn't so bad. I
would need to see the whole sequence to determine the protection
afforded by the helmet. Tailoring limited info to personal bias is the
mark of a ...................tch,tch, mustn't fall into the trap :)

Phil H
 
Bill Sornson wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
> > Dianne Feinstein writes:
> >
> >> I guess racing is a little more dangerous than normal bike riding.

> >
> > http://tinyurl.com/7q7ph
> >
> > He should have turned his head and broke his neck to get the helmet
> > between his head and the road. He's sliding on his ear, below the
> > helmet. As you see the helmet did not hit the ground or it would be
> > toast (or better said, popcorn).
> >
> > However, as we all know, it saved his life

>
> Click "next photo" two more times.


That is all roll, not impact. We can see it is not impact because (a)
no drop- his head is already on the ground; (b) no deformation in the
line. It may very well have saved him some good road rash- impossible
to tell for sure, because the helmet takes up space- but it may also
very well have added torsion.

I suggest we ask him to repeat without the helmet. For science!

Actually, wonder how he came out of it. Where's the after photo of his
forearms?

I wonder how he fell in the first place. No one around him, clean road,
tires still on; but at least one foot out of pedal (on #1), apparently
even in wheel. I suppose a simple slide out, eventually spun a whole
lot when the front tire caught again: what happened between photos #1
and 2. 
 
Philip Holman wrote:
> "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote in
> message news:[email protected]...
>> [email protected] wrote:
>>> Dianne Feinstein writes:
>>>
>>>> I guess racing is a little more dangerous than normal bike riding.
>>>
>>> http://tinyurl.com/7q7ph
>>>
>>> He should have turned his head and broke his neck to get the helmet
>>> between his head and the road. He's sliding on his ear, below the
>>> helmet. As you see the helmet did not hit the ground or it would be
>>> toast (or better said, popcorn).
>>>
>>> However, as we all know, it saved his life

>>
>> Click "next photo" two more times.
>>
>> Bill "denial ain't a river 'round here" S.

>
> Yeh, now he's sliding along on his nose. A trip to ENT isn't so bad. I
> would need to see the whole sequence to determine the protection
> afforded by the helmet. Tailoring limited info to personal bias is the
> mark of a ...................tch,tch, mustn't fall into the trap :)


http://www.cyclingnews.com/photos.p...anhattan_beachgp05/mbgp2005-08-14T09_10_47_02

No tailoring required. He's fortunate to wearing a helmet, or his face and
forehead would be...um, "more involved". No one's claiming it saved his
life -- just that it afforded /some/ protection. (Possibly a good deal;
hard to say with just those pics.)

Didn't one of Ullrich's crashes result in a split-open helmet? (Can't
recall if it was the one where he went thru the team car's rear window or
the one where he went somersaulting into the woods.)

Personally, I believe my lying eyes... BS
 
In article <sIULe.9214$p%[email protected]>,
[email protected] wrote:

> Bill Sornson writes:
>
> >>> I guess racing is a little more dangerous than normal bike riding.

>
> http://tinyurl.com/7q7ph
>
> >> He should have turned his head and broke his neck to get the helmet
> >> between his head and the road. He's sliding on his ear, below the
> >> helmet. As you see the helmet did not hit the ground or it would
> >> be toast (or better said, popcorn).


It looks to me like his helmet is doing a very good job of getting
between his ear and the ground. Helmets contain enough foam that they
stick out a fair bit from the side of the head, even if above the ear,
and will tend to reduce the, ah, involvement of most parts of the head,
face, and ears in these sorts of crashes. Reduce, not eliminated.

> > Click "next photo" two more times.

>
> > Bill "denial ain't a river 'round here" S.

>
> I see no deformed helmet in any of the pictures, nor that there was
> any helmet impact. Dropping such a helmet from the bicycle causes
> more damage than occurred here. I've seen people do that on a ride
> inadvertently while messing with a sweat band.
>
> Jobst Brandt


It's pretty clear that his shoulder saved his life in this case, by
absorbing the initial impact.

This gentleman is going to have a lot of road rash, most likely, and the
helmet is likely reducing the amount he would otherwise get on his face,
ears, and head. But that's somewhat irrelevant, as the rest of him is
going to be Polysporin central for a while, and as I joked in another
thread, if preventing road rash was a primary aim of helmet use, we'd be
talking about mandatory butt helmets. Which, hopefully, we are not.

http://www.printroom.com/ViewGallery.asp?userid=clinster&gallery_id=23042
6&curpage=2

The photographer's site shows a further two pictures in the sequence,
which do little to explain the crash (My guess? mishandled obstacle in
the cornering line) but do make a further case for butt helmets.

-RjC.

--
Ryan Cousineau [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com/
"I don't want kids who are thinking about going into mathematics
to think that they have to take drugs to succeed." -Paul Erdos
 
41 wrote:
> I wonder how he fell in the first place. No one around him, clean road


>From the MBGP site:

"The race course is considered to be challenging and technical. Shaped
like a slightly bent "paperclip", the course features two long
straight-aways, two sweeping 180 degree turns, and 150 ' of climbing
per lap. You can expect a headwind on the downward leg so breakaways
are rarely successful. This race is about team tactics and setting up
for the final turn. With just 200 meters to the finish line, if you
are not in the top 10 coming out of the last turn, you will little to
no chance of winning your event."

As I recall, the turns are so tight that it is difficult to maintain
speed without sliding out.
 
On 14 Aug 2005 19:39:09 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

>I guess racing is a little more dangerous than normal bike riding.
>
>http://www.cyclingnews.com/photos.p...5/manhattan_beachgp05/mbgp2005-08-14T09_10_47



All the helmet debate aside, and it looks like a good old fashioned criterium
hairnet would've done him as much good, check out his left foot tangled in the
spokes of the front wheel. In the next two shots it looks like that wheel's
still got his foot as he and bike flip over. That's gotta hurt. Does this mean
that conventional 28 and 32 spoke wheels are as important to safety as a helmet.

Ron
 
RonSonic wrote:
>Does this mean
> that conventional 28 and 32 spoke wheels are as important to safety as a helmet.
>


Now think about how sharp some of those bladed spokes are...

Speaking of sharp things, I got in a pile-up in this very race 16 years
ago, and had a hamstring tendon severed by a chainring.
 
Ron Ruff wrote:

> Speaking of sharp things, I got in a pile-up in this very race 16
> years ago, and had a hamstring tendon severed by a chainring.


That had to be Ruff Ron.

Bill "slow afternoon" S.
 
[email protected] wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
> > I guess racing is a little more dangerous than normal bike riding.
> >
> > http://www.cyclingnews.com/photos.p...5/manhattan_beachgp05/mbgp2005-08-14T09_10_47

>
> Dear Dianne,
>
> Bah! Here's what real men, aged 4 and under, will do to impress
> beautiful women.
>
> (All mothers are beautiful, and presumably his mother was watching.)
>
> http://www.chieftain.com/metro/1125208800/3
>
> Think of "bronco busting" if the name of this helmeted sport puzzles
> you.
>
> Carl Fogel


Now there's a sport that might be safer with a helmet...