Good Times/Bad Times

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Paul, Sep 5, 2004.

  1. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Some good news and some bad news from me tonight and a plea for help.



    Good news is that I completed the Manchester 100 mile ride (103 actually Mr
    Ride Organiser!) today in 6hrs 50 mins which, considering it was my first
    run over such a large distance I am pretty pleased with. The last 20 miles
    or so was pretty hard but I hung in there and actually felt pretty fresh at
    the end. I raised £300 for Christie's cancer care in the process so a good
    days work.



    However, this has come at a cost to me I can tell you. Some time ago I was
    having problems with numbness down below after rides which I thought I had
    mastered after getting the bike set up professionally and investing in the
    same saddle for both my bikes - a Selle Flight. Everything has seemed ok
    over my normal runs of 30 - 40 miles but today has done me in and the
    problem has returned so I really need some good advice so a few questions:



    1. Over such a long distance is some degree of numbness not inevitable?



    2. Assuming no what else can I do? (Answers including the word 'recumbent'
    will be ignored!! ). Saddles are a very personal thing and it may be a bit
    futile asking for recommendations but I'm getting desperate!



    Finally, on a sad note, last week I arranged to sell my other bike on Ebay
    so as to invest in another one and whilst I rode today on my 2nd bike it was
    sitting in my garage waiting to be boxed and shipped. I say 'was' because
    when I got home some scrote had decided to break in and take it along with
    300 quid's worth of tools and a pressure washer! How can I explain to the
    guy who has bought it that he's gonna be getting his cheque back? Is this
    likely to cause me a problem given it was sold on ebay?



    Hope my house insurance pays out.



    All help with saddle problem much appreciated.



    Cheers



    Paul
     
    Tags:


  2. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Paul
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > However, this has come at a cost to me I can tell you. Some time ago I
    > was having problems with numbness down below after rides which I
    > thought I had mastered after getting the bike set up professionally
    > and investing in the same saddle for both my bikes - a Selle Flight.
    > Everything has seemed ok over my normal runs of 30 - 40 miles but
    > today has done me in and the problem has returned so I really need
    > some good advice so a few questions:
    >
    > 1. Over such a long distance is some degree of numbness not
    > inevitable?


    I haven't done a 100 miles in recent memory, but I did a 70 recently. I
    had pain and incipient cramp in my calves towards the end of it, but no
    saddle discomfort. You definitely should not have any. My saddles are
    Brooks Professionals, and I find them very comfortable. However,
    they're definitely heavy.

    I am looking for a lighter saddle which will be equally comfortable, and
    am currently thinking of experimenting with a Selle Italia SLR which is
    pretty light (135g) and quite a lot of people seem to like.
    <URL:http://www.parker-international.co.uk/ProductDetails/mcs/productID/1323/>

    I was wondering if I could find a site anywhere with either a detailed
    breakdown of the kit on different road race professionals bikes or else
    good photos of the bikes sans rider on which the kit can be identified.
    After all the TdF riders are doing over a hundred miles a day every day
    for three weeks and they must use comfortable saddles. Any suggestions?

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    /-\ You have discovered a security flaw in a Microsoft product. You
    |-| can report this issue to our security tesm. Would you like to
    | | * Be completely ignored (default)?
    | | * Receive a form email full of platitudes about how much we care?
    \_/ * Spend hours helping us fix this problem for free?
     
  3. gemarc

    gemarc New Member

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  4. "Paul" <[email protected]>typed


    > Some good news and some bad news from me tonight and a plea for help.




    > Good news is that I completed the Manchester 100 mile ride (103 actually Mr
    > Ride Organiser!) today in 6hrs 50 mins which, considering it was my first
    > run over such a large distance I am pretty pleased with. The last 20 miles
    > or so was pretty hard but I hung in there and actually felt pretty fresh at
    > the end. I raised £300 for Christie's cancer care in the process so a good
    > days work.


    Well done!

    > 1. Over such a long distance is some degree of numbness not inevitable?


    No. It is a problem with some (very few AAMOF) long-distance riders. (I
    conducted an informal e-survey of this problem on a long-distance
    cyclists email group - [email protected])
    There is much debate about which saddle is best but saddles have to fit
    the rider and we're all different.

    Whichever saddle you use, you must get your weight off it frequently, to
    ease pressure and get some air to the skin. In particular, get your butt
    off the seat whenever cycling over potholes and other irregularities in
    the road.


    > 2. Assuming no what else can I do? (Answers including the word 'recumbent'
    > will be ignored!! ). Saddles are a very personal thing and it may be a bit
    > futile asking for recommendations but I'm getting desperate!


    WAIT!
    Most problems after a single day's ride resolve in time.
    It's unlikely you'll have permanent damage.

    > Finally, on a sad note, last week I arranged to sell my other bike on Ebay
    > so as to invest in another one and whilst I rode today on my 2nd bike it was
    > sitting in my garage waiting to be boxed and shipped. I say 'was' because
    > when I got home some scrote had decided to break in and take it along with
    > 300 quid's worth of tools and a pressure washer! How can I explain to the
    > guy who has bought it that he's gonna be getting his cheque back? Is this
    > likely to cause me a problem given it was sold on ebay?


    Sorry to hear that. Horrible, isn't it?
    I don't think ebay will be a problem so long as you're straight with the
    poor purchaser and refund his dosh ASAP.
    Your failure to deliver the goods is understandable and you've not
    disappeared with the cash.

    > Hope my house insurance pays out.


    So do I>...

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
    Edgware.
     
  5. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Paul <[email protected]> wrote:

    : 1. Over such a long distance is some degree of numbness not inevitable?

    No.


    : 2. Assuming no what else can I do? (Answers including the word 'recumbent'
    : will be ignored!! ). Saddles are a very personal thing and it may be a bit
    : futile asking for recommendations but I'm getting desperate!

    Try lots of saddles. Raise your bars (don't try and emulate a pro riding position).
    Lose weight if you have a spare tyre.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org
    "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  6. David Nutter

    David Nutter Guest

    Simon Brooke <[email protected]> said:

    > I was wondering if I could find a site anywhere with either a detailed
    > breakdown of the kit on different road race professionals bikes or else
    > good photos of the bikes sans rider on which the kit can be identified.
    > After all the TdF riders are doing over a hundred miles a day every day
    > for three weeks and they must use comfortable saddles. Any suggestions?


    ISTR some companies sell TdF team replica bikes which presumably have the same
    level of spec as the genuine article. They'll probably have a complete
    breakdown of the kit for each of their models, even if the sport-following
    sites do not.

    I don't know who these companies are, though.

    Regards,

    -david
     
  7. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    : breakdown of the kit on different road race professionals bikes or else
    : good photos of the bikes sans rider on which the kit can be identified.
    : After all the TdF riders are doing over a hundred miles a day every day
    : for three weeks and they must use comfortable saddles. Any suggestions?

    www.cyclingnews.com

    However, trying to copy pro's equipment and position on the bike with
    out their light weight, flexibility and fitness is a recipe for numbness.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org
    "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  8. Jack Ouzzi

    Jack Ouzzi Guest

    On Mon, 6 Sep 2004 05:38:54 +0100, Helen Deborah Vecht
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Paul" <[email protected]>typed
    >
    >
    >> Some good news and some bad news from me tonight and a plea for help.

    >
    >
    >
    >> Good news is that I completed the Manchester 100 mile ride (103 actually Mr
    >> Ride Organiser!) today in 6hrs 50 mins which, considering it was my first
    >> run over such a large distance I am pretty pleased with. The last 20 miles
    >> or so was pretty hard but I hung in there and actually felt pretty fresh at
    >> the end. I raised £300 for Christie's cancer care in the process so a good
    >> days work.

    >
    >Well done!


    Yes well done indeed ..........


    >
    > In particular, get your butt off the seat


    My wife keeps saying this to me, not sure what she means ;-)
     
  9. Paul

    Paul Guest

    "Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Paul <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : 1. Over such a long distance is some degree of numbness not inevitable?
    >
    > No.
    >
    >
    > : 2. Assuming no what else can I do? (Answers including the word

    'recumbent'
    > : will be ignored!! ). Saddles are a very personal thing and it may be a

    bit
    > : futile asking for recommendations but I'm getting desperate!
    >
    > Try lots of saddles. Raise your bars (don't try and emulate a pro riding

    position).
    > Lose weight if you have a spare tyre.
    >
    > Arthur
    >
    > --
    > Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org
    > "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    > - Paulina Borsook


    Thanks to all so far. A bit of progress in that the insurance company are
    prepared to cough up on the basis of their initial assessment, even though I
    won't get a 'new for old' recompense but something is better than nothing I
    guess. The guy who 'bought' my bike was absolutely great about it with no
    hassle at all and I have arranged to refund him this week - that was a
    relief. I am not counting my chickens yet though - there's a lot of red
    tape to go through before cheque hits mat!

    As a person who tries to see the positive in everything I guess it's my
    opportunity to look for a new bike and I have reflected today over what I
    would really like, particularly as I rode the 100 on Sunday on my Bianchi
    San Remo, which was great, but I couldn't help but ponder how much easier
    the ride would have been had I taken the bike that was being nicked at the
    time. Weight was a big factor for me.

    So...I have decided to go for it and, in addition to whatever insurance cash
    I end up getting, I am gonna sell the Bianchi and push the boat out for a
    really nice road bike which I can do a bit of distance on in addition to
    training. They say you never miss something until its gone.

    I should therefore have a budget of around £1300 of which I will spend what
    I have to in order to get what I want and am comfortable with.

    Oh, and I will also get it insured up to value separately........

    Cheers

    Paul
     
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