Good touring bike?

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by just us, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. just us

    just us Guest

    Well I have been sitting looking on the net for a new bike. Have decided to
    do a distance ride (1500kms) and just feel that my Avanti 21speed Hybrid is
    heavy and slow. I am going to go with another lady and we are looking at new
    hybrids. Specifically we DONT want drop bars as both of us have shoulder
    issues and feel comfortable in the more upright position. So this new bike
    needs to have 27 speeds (went for a 100kms ride on my husbands mountain bike
    and the gears were absolutely terrific on the hills, but position was
    horrendous) be light weight (wow hubbys bike is sooooo light compared with
    my Hybrid). Any suggestions of what I need to look for? I live 100kms from
    Cairns and really they all open catalogues and I am just not wanting to buy
    from a catalogue! I want more suggestions so that I can go in armed with
    some "knowledge".
    Any advice would be helpful thanks
    Kathy.
     
    Tags:


  2. Walrus

    Walrus New Member

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    I'd look at a flatbar, which is basically a roadbike without drops. That way you get the lightweight road bike, with the comfort of an upright, hybrid style.

    Something like the Trek Pilot 1.2 Flatbar. It has a triple chainring (27 gears), will be very light, but also nice and comfortable.
    http://www.bicyclestore.com.au/Trek-Pilot-1.2-Flat-Bar-pr-21096.html

    Giant has their CRX range, which vary in cost. The CRX 3 has a triple chainring. http://www.giant-bicycles.com/au/030.000.000/030.000.000.asp?model=10083

    The other option is a woman specific design. These are getting much more common now. Trek have a WSD range, there's also SUB (Sarah Ulmer Brand)
    which are a purely womens bike manufacturer.

    http://www.sarahulmerbrand.com/sub_bike_five.asp?ID=62
     
  3. just us

    just us Guest

    Ooops forgot to mention - I dont want those skinny wheels LOL. And I dont
    want mountain bike tyres either! Skinny wheels west of here with narrow
    roads and road trains would just be asking for fall offs, punctures etc.
     
  4. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Tue, 11 Jul 2006 10:28:18 +1000, just us wrote:

    > Ooops forgot to mention - I dont want those skinny wheels LOL. And I dont
    > want mountain bike tyres either! Skinny wheels west of here with narrow
    > roads and road trains would just be asking for fall offs, punctures etc.


    Kona Dew or similar. 27" wheels with clearance for ~40mm tyres, upright
    position, road triple. Not as low gearing as a true MTB, but with a 30ish
    cluster you should be able to get up most roads. I think the Avanti Blade
    is a similar kind of bike, possibly with skinnnier wheels.

    The other option is a mid range hardtail MTB with 1.5" slicks. You don't
    lose that much time to a pure roadie, and you've got a lot more options
    about what surfaces can be comfortably traversed. Just check it has rack
    mounts, since 1500km will be a lot more comfy with the weight on the bike.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    Old aunts used to come up to me at weddings, poking me in the ribs and
    cackling, telling me, "You're next." They stopped after I started doing
    the same thing to them at funerals.
     
  5. Walrus

    Walrus New Member

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    You don't have to have the thin tyres. Road bike tyres are 23mm, but you could put 28mm tires on which are a nice touring width. Depends on what terrain you'll be riding, but the rims on those bikes should be able to fit up to 32mm tires, but that would be a question for the shop.
     
  6. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    just us wrote:
    > Well I have been sitting looking on the net for a new bike. Have decided to
    > do a distance ride (1500kms) and just feel that my Avanti 21speed Hybrid is
    > heavy and slow. I am going to go with another lady and we are looking at new
    > hybrids. Specifically we DONT want drop bars as both of us have shoulder
    > issues and feel comfortable in the more upright position.



    Drop bars have nothing to do with upright or forward riding position.
    If you look at a lot of "serious" touring bikes, you'll see that they
    have drop bars. This is for a *reason* and it's not because long
    distance touring requires a racing position.

    If you're looking at those sorts of distances etc, I'd consider a
    Cannondale T800 or T2000, or a Trek 520. Both are kitted out for
    touring with racks, relaxed geometry and ... yes... drop bars. Fuji
    also make a half decent tourer. The Trek is steel, the Cracknfail is
    aluminium alloy. Both are bombproof.

    If the bike is set up for you, the design of the bars is mostly
    irrelevant to the angle of your back and weight on your shoulders, but
    drop bars give you much more comfortable hand placement choices, which
    on a long ride, is very important. Bar ends on flat bars don't give
    you as much choice.

    The other option is those funky "touring bars" you can get - I've
    fitted a few of these to some bikes and they may be an option if you
    just can't get your head out of the "drop bars bad" myth.

    Have a look here :

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/deakins/handlebars.html
     
  7. Jack Russell

    Jack Russell Guest

    just us wrote:
    > Well I have been sitting looking on the net for a new bike. Have decided to
    > do a distance ride (1500kms) and just feel that my Avanti 21speed Hybrid is
    > heavy and slow. I am going to go with another lady and we are looking at new
    > hybrids. Specifically we DONT want drop bars as both of us have shoulder
    > issues and feel comfortable in the more upright position. So this new bike
    > needs to have 27 speeds (went for a 100kms ride on my husbands mountain bike
    > and the gears were absolutely terrific on the hills, but position was
    > horrendous) be light weight (wow hubbys bike is sooooo light compared with
    > my Hybrid). Any suggestions of what I need to look for? I live 100kms from
    > Cairns and really they all open catalogues and I am just not wanting to buy
    > from a catalogue! I want more suggestions so that I can go in armed with
    > some "knowledge".
    > Any advice would be helpful thanks
    > Kathy.
    >
    >

    Take a look at
    http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/

    They are expensive but ....

    I had an XTC with drops, beautiful bike but I needed to go flat bars
    (don't ask) so I lashed out and bought another XTC. I would love to get
    a Raven. The guy who bought my first one is wrapped.
    I rode a Canondale T1000 for years thought it was great but having gone
    to a steel frame would never go back.

    Jack Russell


    --
    Remove norubbish to reply
     
  8. just us wrote:

    > Well I have been sitting looking on the net for a new bike. Have decided to
    > do a distance ride (1500kms) and just feel that my Avanti 21speed Hybrid is
    > heavy and slow. I am going to go with another lady and we are looking at new
    > hybrids.


    What kind of touring are you doing? Credit-card? Camping?
    Fully-self-supported 40kg of water across unwatered outback? This
    leads to the next series of choices:

    Credit-card:
    Something like a road-bike set up to your needs, or a hard-tail light
    mtb, or a cyclo-cross bike (like a roadbike that goes offroad).

    Camping / Fully ss outback:
    You want a touring bike frame or a cyclocross frame with plenty of
    front/rear mount points.

    > Specifically we DONT want drop bars as both of us have shoulder
    > issues and feel comfortable in the more upright position.


    Uhhh. nope. You don't want drop bars in a *racing* position. Imagine
    drop bars, but raised up much higher than on a racing bike. These
    provide many hand positions in a comfortable set up. Wide bars with a
    very shallow drop.

    Or: you want European style touring bars. These look a bit like a
    butterfly. They have a "top" position which is like a raised flat bar,
    then angle down and in to the "normal" riding position which is like a
    normal flat bar. The section between the top and normal position
    allows for a "side" position like using bull-horn bars on a MTB. These
    are *v* comfortable and I found them more to my liking when setting up
    a self-supported tourer. They're also easier to adjust to if you've
    been riding flat bars.

    You *dont* want a flat bar road bike bar. When riding more than an
    hour you need to change hand positions. Flats, even with bar ends,
    don't offer enough positions and body-stretches. So its Eurobars or
    Drops (with the drops set high enough that you're comfortable riding on
    the drops).

    > So this new bike
    > needs to have 27 speeds (went for a 100kms ride on my husbands mountain bike
    > and the gears were absolutely terrific on the hills, but position was
    > horrendous) be light weight (wow hubbys bike is sooooo light compared with
    > my Hybrid).


    Nice! You know your gear requirements. Count the teeth on the lowest
    gear on hubbies bike and take it to Sheldon Brown's gear calculator.
    Use this calculator to compare to the lowest gear on the bike people
    are trying to sell you. If you're riding self-supported, have you
    ridden hubby's bike with the load you want to carry up the biggest
    hills you climb? If not, do so immediately to determine if it can
    carry the load you need! I'm looking at 15" as my lowest gear on my
    tourer, merely because I want three-four useable gears on long big
    hills with heavy loads.

    > Any suggestions of what I need to look for? I live 100kms from
    > Cairns and really they all open catalogues and I am just not wanting to buy
    > from a catalogue! I want more suggestions so that I can go in armed with
    > some "knowledge".


    Look at the touring bike list on phreds, they're very supportive.
    Cheeky Monkey Sydney also sells a bunch of touring bikes. I don't
    recomment the Trek 520 set-up for non-CC touring, the gears are too
    high.

    Also, how big are you? Touring bike design faces tyre-size and frame
    compromise issues. If you are "big" you can ride 700C wheels. If you
    are small you can ride 26" wheels. Look to see if the frame you're
    interested in offers different wheel size to frame size set-ups. If
    the frame you're looking at is 650B, then its probably fine, 650B
    doesn't compromise the frame in smaller sizes for touring.

    Can I recommend you consider the Surly long haul trucker as a frame to
    build up if you're going camping-touring and want to build a bike
    rather than buy pre-packaged?

    If buying a pre-packaged bike the big issues are bars and gears (as
    above).

    You also want mudguards unless you're a racing-bike cyclist going cc
    touring. You also want racks which will carry more than the most
    weight you anticipate.

    hope this helps some, and can I really recommend Eurobars if you are
    adverse to drops even after riding on a bike with drops raised up
    really really really high?

    yours,
    Sam R.
     
  9. Terryc

    Terryc Guest

    1) What sort/type of touring do you want to do?

    Touring varies from "credit card" to fully self contained.

    At one end, you just need wallet and probably handlebar bag (tool kit
    strongly recommended) At the other end, you start off with front and
    rear racks and four good panniers, plus handlebar and maybe bum bag,
    then add tent, sleeping mat, sleeping bag,,,,,,,,,,,,

    just us wrote:
    > Well I have been sitting looking on the net for a new bike. Have decided to
    > do a distance ride (1500kms) and just feel that my Avanti 21speed Hybrid is
    > heavy and slow.


    err, touring bikes are heavier because you carry more junk^h^h^h^hstuff.

    Have you considered just replacing the handlebars to flat, or other
    designs. Might need to change headstem, plus brake and gear levers (and
    cables).

    The butterfly style looks very interesting for the various postions.

    Similarly, you could also just upgrade your gearing, although I would
    personally prefer lesser gears as 27 gears as a weak rear axle in my
    books (but your probably don't tour where I did).


    > I am going to go with another lady and we are looking at new
    > hybrids. Specifically we DONT want drop bars as both of us have shoulder
    > issues and feel comfortable in the more upright position.



    > So this new bike needs to have 27 speeds


    There is something tobe said for walking up hills and using a different
    set of muscles, plus it ensures maximum chances to look at the scenery.

    > Any suggestions of what I need to look for? I live 100kms from
    > Cairns and really they all open catalogues and I am just not wanting to buy
    > from a catalogue! I want more suggestions so that I can go in armed with
    > some "knowledge".


    What knowledge do you have on bicycles?
    Any bicycle can be a touring bike. It just depends on your style of
    touring (as mentioned above) and where you want to go.

    If 1.25" tyres (standard in my jargon) are too narrow because they cause
    too many punctures, then first consider upgrading to thornproof tubes
    (thicker, but heavier, but stay away from rain forest vines)

    Otherwise, you need a frame designed to take the wider rims and tyres.
    MTB tyres vary from up to 2.5" (standard) and yes I am ignoring the
    Pugsley bike with 4" tyres. I've seen 1.5", 1.75", 1.9", 2.0, 2.125" and
    2.5" on mtb style frames.

    > Any advice would be helpful thanks


    Is Lenore simpson still riding around Cairns?
    If you know her, I'd suggest having a talk to her.

    --
    Do the maths for a reply, i.e. no spam(s)
     
  10. In aus.bicycle on 10 Jul 2006 19:24:17 -0700
    [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Look at the touring bike list on phreds, they're very supportive.
    > Cheeky Monkey Sydney also sells a bunch of touring bikes. I don't
    > recomment the Trek 520 set-up for non-CC touring, the gears are too
    > high.


    CM have the euro bars, touring frames, things like that.
    www.cheekymonkey.com.au - select the transport section.

    I'd suggest you might want to take a trip to Brisbane or Sydney to try
    bikes out and look at them.

    Consider also if you want to take a trailer. If you are camping or
    plan to have a base and range out from it, then a trailer might be
    good for carting stuff that you leave at a campground.

    Zebee
     
  11. just us

    just us Guest

    Thanks for some great replies - they all got me thinking.
    I am 48, been riding for a few years. At first I had a MTB but then after
    doing a 800kms ride on a tandem and seeing people with Hybrids I ditched the
    MTB and bought my current Hybrid which was a mid range bike, 21 speed, and I
    have travelled well over 3000kms on it. Probably average about 150kms each
    week and can go off for a day or two of 100+kms/day.
    I weigh 70kgs (well someone did ask!) and also do a lot of bushwalking in
    the mountains around here so am in good shape.
    I had to look up "credit card" touring LOLLLLL nooooo!
    We are planning to do a ride from the Atherton Tablelands down the middle to
    Moura. Both of us are experienced bushwalkers so have all the light weight
    gear and plan to only carry around 10kgs each of camp gear. We will need to
    carry water, yes and also some bike bits. Any food we take will be light
    weight but we wont carry too much as know how much we need between shops.
    I already have the panniers etc.
    The "trekking" bars from http://www.sheldonbrown.com/deakins/handlebars.html
    look very appealing. Thanks Bleve. Previous attempts at drop bars brought
    back numb fingers, frozen shoulders, and pain pain pain that lasted weeks. I
    have read that the lower bars give you more power, so will have to keep
    researching that.
    I basically would love to just get a lighter bike, better gearing,
    comfortable, that was able to carry camp gear etc. I would also ride it each
    day to work etc.
    Keep them coming and thank you!
    Kathy
     
  12. Darryl C

    Darryl C Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > just us wrote:
    >
    > > Well I have been sitting looking on the net for a new bike. Have decided to
    > > do a distance ride (1500kms) and just feel that my Avanti 21speed Hybrid is
    > > heavy and slow. I am going to go with another lady and we are looking at new
    > > hybrids.

    >

    (snip)
    >
    > Or: you want European style touring bars. These look a bit like a
    > butterfly. They have a "top" position which is like a raised flat bar,
    > then angle down and in to the "normal" riding position which is like a
    > normal flat bar. The section between the top and normal position
    > allows for a "side" position like using bull-horn bars on a MTB. These
    > are *v* comfortable and I found them more to my liking when setting up
    > a self-supported tourer. They're also easier to adjust to if you've
    > been riding flat bars.
    >
    > You *dont* want a flat bar road bike bar. When riding more than an
    > hour you need to change hand positions. Flats, even with bar ends,
    > don't offer enough positions and body-stretches. So its Eurobars or
    > Drops (with the drops set high enough that you're comfortable riding on
    > the drops).
    >
    > > So this new bike
    > > needs to have 27 speeds (went for a 100kms ride on my husbands mountain bike
    > > and the gears were absolutely terrific on the hills, but position was
    > > horrendous) be light weight (wow hubbys bike is sooooo light compared with
    > > my Hybrid).

    >
    > Nice! You know your gear requirements. Count the teeth on the lowest
    > gear on hubbies bike and take it to Sheldon Brown's gear calculator.
    > Use this calculator to compare to the lowest gear on the bike people
    > are trying to sell you. If you're riding self-supported, have you
    > ridden hubby's bike with the load you want to carry up the biggest
    > hills you climb? If not, do so immediately to determine if it can
    > carry the load you need! I'm looking at 15" as my lowest gear on my
    > tourer, merely because I want three-four useable gears on long big
    > hills with heavy loads.
    >
    > > Any suggestions of what I need to look for? I live 100kms from
    > > Cairns and really they all open catalogues and I am just not wanting to buy
    > > from a catalogue! I want more suggestions so that I can go in armed with
    > > some "knowledge".

    >
    > Look at the touring bike list on phreds, they're very supportive.
    > Cheeky Monkey Sydney also sells a bunch of touring bikes. I don't
    > recomment the Trek 520 set-up for non-CC touring, the gears are too
    > high.
    >
    > Also, how big are you? Touring bike design faces tyre-size and frame
    > compromise issues. If you are "big" you can ride 700C wheels. If you
    > are small you can ride 26" wheels. Look to see if the frame you're
    > interested in offers different wheel size to frame size set-ups. If
    > the frame you're looking at is 650B, then its probably fine, 650B
    > doesn't compromise the frame in smaller sizes for touring.
    >
    > Can I recommend you consider the Surly long haul trucker as a frame to
    > build up if you're going camping-touring and want to build a bike
    > rather than buy pre-packaged?
    >
    > If buying a pre-packaged bike the big issues are bars and gears (as
    > above).
    >
    > You also want mudguards unless you're a racing-bike cyclist going cc
    > touring. You also want racks which will carry more than the most
    > weight you anticipate.
    >
    > hope this helps some, and can I really recommend Eurobars if you are
    > adverse to drops even after riding on a bike with drops raised up
    > really really really high?
    >
    > yours,
    > Sam R.


    Kathy,

    It would be great if you keep us informed about this project as it
    evolves.

    As Sam has said, the Surly bikes are very nice. I just happened to be in
    Cheeky Monkey (Sydney CBD) the other day and saw the long-haul trucker
    set up for touring. I did not look at the price.

    The PDF from the Surly website is here:
    <http://www.surlybikes.com/files/SURLYLongHaul.pdf>

    I am going into the city again on Thursday and Friday so could take some
    photos and email them to you if you like (and get any other details you
    would like). Unfortunately the Cheeky Monkey website is 'basic'.

    regards,
    Darryl
     
  13. EuanB

    EuanB New Member

    Joined:
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    Pick up the latest copy of Australian Cyclist if you can, a lot of touring articles in that issue. Should give you some ideas. I'm with Bleve on the drop bars thing, set them up for touring as opposed to racing and they're very comfortable. Won't catch me using flat bars for anything except off-road.

    Have a look at http://www.downtheroad.org Those bikes look seriously tasty.
     
  14. Fractal

    Fractal Guest

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: <[email protected]>
    >
    > Look at the touring bike list on phreds, they're very supportive.
    > Cheeky Monkey Sydney also sells a bunch of touring bikes. I don't
    > recomment the Trek 520 set-up for non-CC touring, the gears are too
    > high.
    >

    You can put a 26 front ring/30 or 32 rear cog (or maybe a 24/34?) on a
    Trek which gives a pretty low granny for touring. The 52/11 top gear is a
    bit excessive, but good for blasting down hills, but if you could find
    something smaller which fits (which my LBS couldnt), like a 49 or something,
    you end up overlapping the middle chain ring ratios, so no point changing
    it. I did change the middle front ring to a smaller size, to give a lower
    gear before having to slip into granny. This was sometimes a bit difficult
    as it was a big drop from 42 to 26.

    A mate just bought a road bike and modified it to take a 34 rear, a sort of
    sheep in wolfs clothing?

    As for handlebars, a lot of touring riders get extenders added to the
    headset to get a higher position for drop bars. Or there are stems with
    tiltable extensions to give a bit more height. A bit naff but they seem to
    work.

    fb in sunny sinney
     
  15. Travis

    Travis Guest

    just us wrote:
    > Well I have been sitting looking on the net for a new bike. Have decided to
    > do a distance ride (1500kms) and just feel that my Avanti 21speed Hybrid is
    > heavy and slow.


    Too heavy and slow eh? There are some nice bikes out there which are a
    lot of fun.

    I've seen a few of these on SBS lately, apparently they're quite
    popular on the Tour...

    http://www2.trekbikes.com.au/catalogue.cgi?rm=product&product_id=162&category_id=3&subcategory_id=27

    http://pinarello.com/eng/pariscar_FP_orange_scheda.php

    Travis
     
  16. cogcontrol

    cogcontrol New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2004
    Messages:
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    All the other posts have contributed alot of very usefull info, it is not a simple question you are asking.

    A number of posts have mentioned specialised tourers and if you want to go this way it is worth spending on something that will last you a life time. There are not many framebuilders in Aus specialising is such bike but it may be worth checking on www.velosmith.com.au who have good reputation.

    CC
     
  17. Mike

    Mike Guest

    just us wrote:
    > Specifically we DONT want drop bars as both of us have shoulder
    > issues and feel comfortable in the more upright position.


    Recognise that the upright sitting position has far more effect on
    your speed than anything else. So a new upright bike won't be faster.
    Assuming you have a good cadence, and no knobby tyres.

    > So this new bike
    > needs to have 27 speeds (went for a 100kms ride on my husbands mountain bike


    Its the number of teeth, not gears, that counts. The MTB probably has
    much smaller chainrings (front cogs) than your hybrid.

    > and the gears were absolutely terrific on the hills, but position was
    > horrendous)


    Horrendous how? e.g. legs pushing into the belly when pedalling?
    Were you comfortable coasting?
     
  18. Mike

    Mike Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > You *dont* want a flat bar road bike bar. When riding more than an
    > hour you need to change hand positions. Flats, even with bar ends,
    > don't offer enough positions and body-stretches.


    AERO-BARS!
    I normally use a flat-bar bike for touring. Plenty of people cope with
    just bar-ends, but adding aero-bars is great. I can hold the pads for an
    extra-upright position on hill climbs too. Aero bars are much more
    comfortable than drop-bars, IMHO, but take some getting used to.
    (not good for racing, of course.)

    > I'm looking at 15" as my lowest gear on my
    > tourer, merely because I want three-four useable gears on long big
    > hills with heavy loads.


    I thought I had the lowest gear :-(
    Using 26" (nominal) rims with slicks give a 25" tyre, times 22T:34T
    gears gives over 16". How do you get 15"? Got a 20T granny?

    OP Didn't state budget. Treks and Cannondales can be expensive!
    And they might need the crankset changed to get low gears.
     
  19. In aus.bicycle on Wed, 12 Jul 2006 09:49:11 +0800
    Mike <[email protected]> wrote:
    > just us wrote:
    >> Specifically we DONT want drop bars as both of us have shoulder
    >> issues and feel comfortable in the more upright position.

    >
    > Recognise that the upright sitting position has far more effect on
    > your speed than anything else. So a new upright bike won't be faster.
    > Assuming you have a good cadence, and no knobby tyres.
    >


    <insert plug for recumbents here>

    Not that I'd recommend a bent for anyone going offroad, and not that
    they are *cheap* or horrifically light.

    But for comfort while being aerodynamic, can't beat em.

    Zebee
     
  20. Mike wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > hour you need to change hand positions. Flats, even with bar ends,
    > > don't offer enough positions and body-stretches.

    > AERO-BARS!


    I stand corrected. Sounds reasonable for positions!

    > > I'm looking at 15" as my lowest gear on my
    > > tourer, merely because I want three-four useable gears on long big
    > > hills with heavy loads.

    >
    > I thought I had the lowest gear :-(
    > Using 26" (nominal) rims with slicks give a 25" tyre, times 22T:34T
    > gears gives over 16". How do you get 15"? Got a 20T granny?


    20T granny :). Some people say get off and walk, but I hate walking a
    load uphill.

    > OP Didn't state budget. Treks and Cannondales can be expensive!
    > And they might need the crankset changed to get low gears.


    That's the big one. Budget lets many other things fall into place.

    Sam R.
     
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