Got it - don't use on road pedals in dirt

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Tai, Oct 5, 2003.

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  1. Tai

    Tai Guest

    I take from most of your responses that it's not a good idea to use the road Speedplay pedals in the
    dirt unless my wife and I are very careful. Considering how much those pedals cost, I'll just get
    some new clipless pedals. The Time ATAC seem very nice, but how about those $20 SPD pedals from
    Nashbar and other shops? Is 4 degrees of float too little?

    JTM
     
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  2. I personally have no problem with 4 degrees of float. I know the speedplay 20 degrees of float is
    advertised as "knee friendly", but I've never really had knee trouble because of using SPD's.

    I've never tried those $20 nashbar pedals, but they look pretty well made. Anything like that will
    definately be a lot better in mud than speedplay and for the price, they're definately worth a shot.
    I'd be curious to hear the comments about them too, since I wouldnt' mind a new pair of SPD's

    Mike http://mikebeauchamp.com

    "Tai" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I take from most of your responses that it's not a good idea to use the road Speedplay pedals in
    > the dirt unless my wife and I are very careful. Considering how much those pedals cost, I'll just
    > get some new clipless pedals. The Time ATAC seem very nice, but how about those $20 SPD pedals
    > from Nashbar and other shops? Is 4 degrees of float too little?
    >
    > JTM
     
  3. cliff

    cliff New Member

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    I had a pair of the Nashbar $20 off road pedals-Wellgo, so same as Ritchey. I thought they were pretty good for the price. I switched to Time ATAC and find them to be more secure and yet somewhat easier to get in and out of. I'm told if you ride in lots of mud (which I don'), the times clear better and don't jam up locking your foot in. Just my 2 cents.

    cliff
     
  4. > I take from most of your responses that it's not a good idea to use the road Speedplay pedals in
    > the dirt unless my wife and I are very careful. Considering how much those pedals cost, I'll just
    > get some new clipless pedals. The Time ATAC seem very nice, but how about those $20 SPD pedals
    > from Nashbar and other shops? Is 4 degrees of float too little?

    The cheaper pedals are typically made by Wellgo (a large generic pedal company in Taiwan) and of
    varying quality. I've seen some where entry and release weren't nearly as easy (or consistent)
    as the least-expensive Shimano offerings (the SPD-515 and newer 520). If you have the
    opportunity at the shop, try each and see how they feel. People will spend all manner of money
    for a slightly-better tire; could be that a $30 price difference on a pair of pedals could be a
    better buy!

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  5. Josh Gatts

    Josh Gatts Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > The cheaper pedals are typically made by Wellgo (a large generic pedal company in Taiwan) and of
    > varying quality. I've seen some where entry and release weren't nearly as easy (or consistent) as
    > the least-expensive Shimano offerings (the SPD-515 and newer 520). If you have the
    opportunity
    > at the shop, try each and see how they feel. People will spend all manner of money for a
    > slightly-better tire; could be that a $30 price difference
    on
    > a pair of pedals could be a better buy!
    >

    Maybe there's a quality control issue and I got lucky, but I can't tell any difference between the
    (presumably Wellgo) Performance SPD clones on my fixie and the Shimano 515s on my touring bike; they
    both work fine. I'm using Shimano cleats, FWIW.

    To the OP, 4 degrees of float should be fine if you have the cleats set up right. Just make sure
    your ankles are in the natural position at the center of the float. Bring a hex wrench with you the
    first couple of times you ride with them so you can tweak the cleats.

    --Josh
     
  6. Tai wrote:
    > I take from most of your responses that it's not a good idea to use the road Speedplay pedals in
    > the dirt unless my wife and I are very careful. Considering how much those pedals cost, I'll just
    > get some new clipless pedals. The Time ATAC seem very nice, but how about those $20 SPD pedals
    > from Nashbar and other shops? Is 4 degrees of float too little?

    I have several pairs of Nashbar pedals and the only problem I've had is one pair made a lot or
    clicking noises. Turns out it had almost no grease in the bearings. I packed them full of grease,
    re-adjusted , and they have been good since.

    CRM
     
  7. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Tai" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I take from most of your responses that it's not a good idea to use the road Speedplay pedals in
    > the dirt unless my wife and I are very careful. Considering how much those pedals cost, I'll just
    > get some new clipless pedals. The Time ATAC seem very nice, but how about those $20 SPD pedals
    > from Nashbar and other shops? Is 4 degrees of float too little?

    The re-labeled Wellgos that Nashbar sells are OK. Be aware that some of them are "SPD-style", and
    some are "SPD-compatible", meaning that the compatibility with Shimano cleats/pedals varies. Shimano
    515's were available for $32 this summer (I haven't checked since), so that makes a difficult choice
    if you're frugal.
     
  8. Doug Taylor

    Doug Taylor Guest

    [email protected] (Tai) wrote:

    >I take from most of your responses that it's not a good idea to use the road Speedplay pedals in
    >the dirt unless my wife and I are very careful.

    Forget it. You can't walk with the cleats; they aren't made for it. Off-road requires some if not
    frequent dismounting and portage. The Speedplay cleats will be ruined in a matter of minutes walking
    on trails, and even if they aren't, they don't work once clogged with dirt or mud. Not appropriate
    for off-road, which is why Speedplay sells Frogs.

    Another pedal to consider is Crank Brothers Eggbeater: easy in and out, no adjustments (as with
    ATAC), great mud clearance, good float.

    --dt
     
  9. Morris-<< Considering how much those pedals cost, I'll just get some new clipless pedals. The Time
    ATAC seem very nice, but how about those $20 SPD pedals from Nashbar and other shops? >><BR><BR>

    To get the pedals to $20, they have to sacrifice somethin', most likely the bearing/bushing quality.
    $20 seems like a great deal but if they wear out quickly, perhaps a more expensive pair(Times are
    about $85) may be a better 'value'..

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  10. "Josh Gatts" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > The cheaper pedals are typically made by Wellgo (a large generic pedal company in Taiwan) and of
    > > varying quality. I've seen some where entry and release weren't nearly as easy (or consistent)
    > > as the least-expensive Shimano offerings (the SPD-515 and newer 520). If you have the
    > opportunity
    > > at the shop, try each and see how they feel. People will spend all manner of money for a
    > > slightly-better tire; could be that a $30 price difference
    > on
    > > a pair of pedals could be a better buy!
    > >
    >
    > Maybe there's a quality control issue and I got lucky, but I can't tell any difference between the
    > (presumably Wellgo) Performance SPD clones on my fixie and the Shimano 515s on my touring bike;
    > they both work fine. I'm using Shimano cleats, FWIW.
    >
    I have gone through three sets of the Performance SPD clones. On two, the metal that held the cleat
    broke and on one the screw that held the pedal on the shaft fell out (during a 1200K, I pedalled 30
    miles one-legged). Performance always replaced them but it can really be inconvenient.

    I hope the Nashbars are not made by the same company.

    Speaking only from my own experience, Tom
     
  11. Grenouil

    Grenouil Guest

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Morris-<< Considering how much those pedals cost, I'll
    just get some
    > new clipless pedals. The Time ATAC seem very nice, but
    how about
    > those $20 SPD pedals from Nashbar and other shops?
    >><BR><BR>
    >
    > To get the pedals to $20, they have to sacrifice
    somethin', most likely the
    > bearing/bushing quality. $20 seems like a great deal but
    if they wear out
    > quickly, perhaps a more expensive pair(Times are about
    $85) may be a better
    > 'value'..
    >
    > Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    > (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"

    I suspect all they sacrifice is the "wowee" factor.........
     
  12. Chalo

    Chalo Guest

    [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote:

    > To get the pedals to $20, they have to sacrifice somethin', most likely the bearing/bushing
    > quality.

    Most of the expensive pedals out there have crap bearings too-- that is, bushings. Funny you use the
    term "bushing quality" since in this application it's oxymoronic.

    Time ATAC plastic pedals use nicer bearings, but then they're made of plastic. The aluminum ones use
    the same junky bushings as everybody else's clipless pedals.

    I wonder if the folks who pony up $100 or more for pedals with bushings instead of ball bearings
    would pay real money for wheels with bushings instead of ball bearings. If that was the crap they
    were being shoveled, I bet they would.

    Chalo Colina
     
  13. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 5 Oct 2003 19:06:15 -0700, [email protected] (Tai) wrote:
    >I take from most of your responses that it's not a good idea to use the road Speedplay pedals in
    >the dirt unless my wife and I are very careful. Considering how much those pedals cost, I'll just
    >get some new clipless pedals. The Time ATAC seem very nice, but how about those $20 SPD pedals from
    >Nashbar and other shops? Is 4 degrees of float too little?

    I'm very happy with the $20 Nashbar SPDs. Easy in/out, secure, etc. I have been using them on a road
    bike, though, and I don't know how well they'd handle much dirt.

    >JTM
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  14. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Tai) wrote:

    > I take from most of your responses that it's not a good idea to use the road Speedplay pedals in
    > the dirt unless my wife and I are very careful. Considering how much those pedals cost, I'll just
    > get some new clipless pedals. The Time ATAC seem very nice, but how about those $20 SPD pedals
    > from Nashbar and other shops? Is 4 degrees of float too little?

    If you're used to the Speedplays, you may find the lack of "float" bothersome. I switched from the
    Speedplay road pedals to the Frog pedals on all my bikes and am very happy. The pedals feel the
    same, maintainance is easier, and they work great for cyclo-cross.
     
  15. "Tim McNamara" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Tai) wrote:
    >
    > > I take from most of your responses that it's not a good idea to use the road Speedplay pedals in
    > > the dirt unless my wife and I are very careful. Considering how much those pedals cost, I'll
    > > just get some new clipless pedals. The Time ATAC seem very nice, but how about those $20 SPD
    > > pedals from Nashbar and other shops? Is 4 degrees of float too little?
    >
    > If you're used to the Speedplays, you may find the lack of "float" bothersome. I switched from the
    > Speedplay road pedals to the Frog pedals on all my bikes and am very happy. The pedals feel the
    > same, maintainance is easier, and they work great for cyclo-cross.
    Yeah, they work great but they don't last as long as they should. I have had mine for three seasons
    and about 5000 miles and now I'll have to change the bearings bacause I've got considerable play in
    them. I've not had that problem with my Shimano and Look pedals. Neither with my X2's. Hjalmar
     
  16. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Hjalmar Duklæt" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Tim McNamara" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > If you're used to the Speedplays, you may find the lack of "float" bothersome. I switched from
    > > the Speedplay road pedals to the Frog pedals on all my bikes and am very happy. The pedals feel
    > > the same, maintainance is easier, and they work great for cyclo-cross.
    >
    > Yeah, they work great but they don't last as long as they should. I have had mine for three
    > seasons and about 5000 miles and now I'll have to change the bearings bacause I've got
    > considerable play in them. I've not had that problem with my Shimano and Look pedals. Neither with
    > my X2's.

    Well, I bought my X/2s in 1994 and they still work fine, there's a little play in the bearings and
    the "lollipop" body is pretty severely worn so the cleats rock a bit. My oldest Frogs are 3 years
    old (probably 6500 to 8000 miles on those) and thus far have not developed any significant play.

    However, none of these modern pedals seem to hold a candle to my 25 year old Campy SLs in terms of
    durability...
     
  17. "Tim McNamara" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Hjalmar Duklæt" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > "Tim McNamara" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > > If you're used to the Speedplays, you may find the lack of "float" bothersome. I switched from
    > > > the Speedplay road pedals to the Frog pedals on all my bikes and am very happy. The pedals
    > > > feel the same, maintainance is easier, and they work great for cyclo-cross.
    > >
    > > Yeah, they work great but they don't last as long as they should. I have had mine for three
    > > seasons and about 5000 miles and now I'll have to change the bearings bacause I've got
    > > considerable play in them. I've not had that problem with my Shimano and Look pedals. Neither
    > > with my X2's.
    >
    > Well, I bought my X/2s in 1994 and they still work fine, there's a little play in the bearings and
    > the "lollipop" body is pretty severely worn so the cleats rock a bit. My oldest Frogs are 3 years
    > old (probably 6500 to 8000 miles on those) and thus far have not developed any significant play.
    Maybe I've not greased them often enough. I'll certainly do that after I've installed new bearings.
    How often do you grease your pedals? I also wonder why the Frog pedals have only got two bearings
    (one needle and one cartridge) whilst the X-pedals have got three (one needle and two cartridge)?
    Are they less prone to wear?? I thought it might have been the other way around.
    >
    > However, none of these modern pedals seem to hold a candle to my 25 year old Campy SLs in terms of
    > durability...
    Yeah, the old stuff seems to be impossible to wear out. Hjalmar
     
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