GPS and Palm pilots

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Ian Sant, Mar 5, 2004.

  1. W. D. Grey

    W. D. Grey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Paul Saunders
    <[email protected]> writes
    >If you hold it in your hand, press the buttons and stare at
    >it constantly yes, of course it's dangerous. It's also
    >extremely dangerous to take your hands off the wheel to
    >change gears, use the indicator, switch lights etc. and to
    >stare constantly at the speedometer, rev counter,
    >mileometer, petrol gauge and oil light too, so why aren't
    >all of these things illegal too?

    Consider this - some time ago a chap installed a miniature
    TV in his dash. It was placed so that he couldn't actually
    see it while driving, yet he was booked for having it there
    anyway. Where's the sense in that. Again "The Law is a Ass".

    Tailgating is illegal as the programmes on TV spell it out
    to us so often yet today I watched a Police Volvo tailgating
    another car as he was impatient to overtake.

    We can all find instances of "offences" and ask why? but who
    are we to question the combined brains of highly paid civil
    servants/Police experts who take these decisions.
    --
    Bill Grey http://www.billboy.co.uk
     


  2. Fran

    Fran Guest

    [email protected] said...
    > Tailgating is illegal as the programmes on TV spell it out
    > to us so often yet today I watched a Police Volvo
    > tailgating another car as he was impatient to overtake.
    >
    I quite fancy having one of my windscreen washer jets bored
    out to about 3mm and angled in such a way that it goes right
    over my car and onto the windscreen or bonnet of the car
    that's too close behind
    me. When I do this I shall fill the reservoir (a separate
    one, of course) with paint stripper...
    --
    Fran If you need my email address please ask.
     
  3. W. D. Grey wrote:

    > Tailgating is illegal as the programmes on TV spell it out
    > to us so often yet today I watched a Police Volvo
    > tailgating another car as he was impatient to overtake.

    On my way back from Southampton I followed (at a leisurely
    distance) a car that stayed within about 5 yards of the
    large lorry in front of it, pretty much all the way from
    Warminster to Bath. The driver was so close that he (she?)
    couldn't possibly have seen the road conditions in front of
    the lorry, nor did he seem to want to overtake it.

    I watched expectantly, waiting to see Darwinism in action,
    but it was not to be. Clearly that particular species has
    evolved very good reactions, if not much intelligence.

    Paul
    --
    http://www.wilderness-wales.co.uk
    http://www.wildwales.fsnet.co.uk
    http://www.photosig.com/go/users/userphotos?id=118749
     
  4. Rj Webb

    Rj Webb Guest

    >Tailgating is illegal as the programmes on TV spell it out
    >to us so often yet today I watched a Police Volvo
    >tailgating another car as he was impatient to overtake.

    Was nearly taken out yesterday by a police van indicating to
    turn left and then using the junction to U turn, without
    looking obviously - Just as well I was not tailgating,

    Richard Webb
     
  5. Kro

    Kro Guest

    "Fran" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] said...
    > > Tailgating is illegal as the programmes on TV spell it
    > > out to us so often yet today I watched a Police Volvo
    > > tailgating another car as he was impatient to overtake.
    > >
    > I quite fancy having one of my windscreen washer jets
    > bored out to about 3mm and angled in such a way that it
    > goes right over my car and onto the windscreen or bonnet
    > of the car that's too close behind
    > me. When I do this I shall fill the reservoir (a separate
    > one, of course) with paint stripper...
    > --
    > Fran

    Fran, you're not the only one who's thought of that! I would
    like directional jets one to go off to the right to the
    poser in the open top sports car as he finally overtakes
    after scraping the registration off my rear number plate.

    KRO
     
  6. W. D. Grey

    W. D. Grey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Fran <[email protected]> writes
    >I quite fancy having one of my windscreen washer jets bored
    >out to about 3mm and angled in such a way that it goes
    >right over my car and onto the windscreen or bonnet of the
    >car that's too close behind
    >me. When I do this I shall fill the reservoir (a separate
    > one, of course) with paint stripper...

    Funny thing your saying this - I was on the same wavelength
    yesterday
    when I suggested spraying oily water over my car onto the
    following one.
    --
    Bill Grey http://www.billboy.co.uk
     
  7. W. D. Grey

    W. D. Grey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Paul
    Saunders <[email protected]> writes
    >I watched expectantly, waiting to see Darwinism in action,
    >but it was not to be. Clearly that particular species has
    >evolved very good reactions, if not much intelligence.
    I and others did witness this phenomenon in action a year
    or so on the way to the Royal Welsh at Built. A car coming
    up from behind tailgated me for a few yards the overtook
    me. SHE then tailgated other traffic all the way from Cray
    to Builth. Just outside the car park in Builth where the
    traffic was halting and forming a queue.....you've guessed
    it - she ruined some poor bugger's day by using the car in
    front to stop.
    --
    Bill Grey http://www.billboy.co.uk
     
  8. W. D. Grey wrote:

    > A car coming up from behind tailgated me for a few yards
    > the overtook me. SHE then tailgated other traffic all the
    > way from Cray to Builth.

    Of course, if you've ever watched motor racing you'll
    realise that cars do that purposely to get into the slip
    stream of the car in front in order to get a boost of speed
    in which to pass them, although this phenomenon has a
    limited effect on the much slower speeds than normal cars
    travel at.

    I find that when overtaking it's better to get a good run up
    from a distance, but that's only possible when you have a
    long straight section of road. If the road is twisty and you
    have a particularly slow driver in front you need to be
    quite close in order to take advantage of what may be a very
    short opportunity to pass, although such driving can be
    rather stressful. Much easier to get philosophical, hang
    back and simply take your time.

    I do think that excessively slow drivers are partly to blame
    though. I was following one guy doing 25 in the 30 zone and
    30-35 in the 40 zone today. Yeah I know that 40 is the limit
    and it's not compulsory to drive at that speed, but it's
    still annoying, especially when 50 or 60 wouldn't have been
    out of place on that particular stretch of road - long,
    straight and out in the countryside.

    Paul
    --
    http://www.wilderness-wales.co.uk
    http://www.wildwales.fsnet.co.uk
    http://www.photosig.com/go/users/userphotos?id=118749
     
  9. Theo

    Theo Guest

    "Paul Saunders" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    news:[email protected]...
    > W. D. Grey wrote:
    >
    > I do think that excessively slow drivers are partly to
    > blame though. I was following one guy doing 25 in the 30
    > zone and 30-35 in the 40 zone today. > Paul

    Was he driving a Volvo ?

    Theo
     
  10. "Paul Saunders" <[email protected]> writes:

    >W. D. Grey wrote:

    >> A car coming up from behind tailgated me for a few yards
    >> the overtook me. SHE then tailgated other traffic all the
    >> way from Cray to Builth.

    >I find that when overtaking it's better to get a good run
    >up from a distance, but that's only possible when you have
    >a long straight section of road. If the road is twisty and
    >you have a particularly slow driver in front you need to be
    >quite close in order to take advantage of what may be a
    >very short opportunity to pass, although such driving can
    >be rather stressful. Much easier to get philosophical, hang
    >back and simply take your time.

    If you can bothered, however, a better strategy for
    overtaking on twisty roads is to spot places where vision
    might open up enough, and time your acceleration so as to
    arrive behind the car, going faster, so you can take
    advantage of an opportunity with a head-start of speed, but
    with enough space to brake and fall back if there is no
    opportunity. The extra speed can give you time to get past
    in smaller spaces than would otherwise be possible.

    >I do think that excessively slow drivers are partly to
    >blame though. I was following one guy doing 25 in the 30
    >zone and 30-35 in the 40 zone today. Yeah I know that 40 is
    >the limit and it's not compulsory to drive at that speed,
    >but it's still annoying, especially when 50 or 60 wouldn't
    >have been out of place on that particular stretch of road -
    >long, straight and out in the countryside.

    Perhaps his brakes had gone. Perhaps his suspension had gone
    and he had a bad back. Perhaps...

    People too readily assume that someone going a lot slower or
    faster than they would is an idiot.
    --
    Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
    IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
     
  11. Steve Jones

    Steve Jones Guest

    > Consider this - some time ago a chap installed a miniature
    > TV in his dash.

    I have to ask - Why??

    > It was placed so that he couldn't actually see it while
    > driving, yet he was booked for having it there anyway.
    > Where's the sense in that?

    So should it also be okay for Billy the Boy Racer who is ten
    times more likely to have a serious accident to have a
    further distraction in his car and make him even more unsafe
    on the road? That is after all the most likely class of
    driver to want to have a telly in his dashboard.

    > Again "The Law is a Ass".

    Maybe so.

    > We can all find instances of "offences" and ask why? but
    > who are we to question the combined brains of highly paid
    > civil servants/Police experts who take these decisions.

    I have first hand knowledge of instances where a young
    girl was killed after going head on into a lorry whilst
    texting, and another where an elderly couple were cut out
    of their car because the other (unharmed) driver swerved
    head on into them whilst on his phone. Since it became
    illegal, the vast majority of drivers do not use their
    phones and the roads are a safer place for it. If I could
    meet the "Ass" responsible for this particular bit of long
    overdue legislation, I would shake him/her warmly by the
    hand/hoof for
    it.

    Steve Jones
     
  12. Steve Jones

    Steve Jones Guest

    > >Tailgating is illegal as the programmes on TV spell it
    > >out to us so often yet today I watched a Police Volvo
    > >tailgating another car as he was impatient to overtake.

    I drive a police Volvo at work & we are taught to drive in a
    'follow position' (safe distance), unless needing to make
    progress, when an overtake is anticipated, where appropriate
    you briefly move up to an 'overtake position' (closer).
    Particularly for right hand bends when moving close allows a
    view past the offside of the vehicle in front to see any
    potential hazards ahead. If the overtake is not on, the
    driver should drop back to a safe 'follow distance'.
    Tailgating when there is no chance of an overtake is
    dangerous, no matter who or what is doing the tailgating.
    >
    > Was nearly taken out yesterday by a police van indicating
    > to turn left and then using the junction to U turn,
    > without looking obviously - Just as well I was not
    > tailgating,

    Driving a police vehicle does not make the driver a good
    one. There are good and bad out there, just as in any other
    course of life. You should report instances such as this. I
    can't guarantee that anything would happen in the first
    instance, but if a particular driver is subject of a number
    of complaints, his boss is going to have to take remedial
    action. That is particularly the case today when everyting
    is recorded and the option of not doing anything can be
    later brought into question if that driver is involved in a
    serious accident.

    Steve Jones
     
  13. Joe Bloggs

    Joe Bloggs Guest

    "Chris Malcolm" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Paul Saunders" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    <snip>

    > Perhaps his brakes had gone. Perhaps his suspension had
    > gone and he had a bad back. Perhaps...
    >
    > People too readily assume that someone going a lot slower
    > or faster than they would is an idiot.
    > --
    >
    Everyone who goes slower than me is a doddering old git,
    while everyone who overtakes me is obviously a reckless,
    irresponsible fool!!

    Dave
     
  14. Steve Jones wrote:

    > Since it became illegal, the vast majority of drivers
    > do not use their phones and the roads are a safer
    > place for it.

    I still see people doing it. Saw two yesterday.

    I guess that so many people do it habitually they don't even
    think about it, and there are so few police cars on the
    roads these days because of all the speed cameras that
    there's rarely ever a policeman around to see
    it.

    So it seems that at least some people's attitude the the new
    law is that it's okay to ignore it provided you don't think
    you'll get caught. Having done it for so long, many people
    undoubtedly think that it's perfectly safe when they do it.

    Paul
    --
    http://www.wilderness-wales.co.uk
    http://www.wildwales.fsnet.co.uk
    http://www.photosig.com/go/users/userphotos?id=118749
     
  15. Chris Malcolm wrote:

    > If you can bothered, however, a better strategy for
    > overtaking on twisty roads is to spot places where vision
    > might open up enough, and time your acceleration so as to
    > arrive behind the car, going faster, so you can take
    > advantage of an opportunity with a head-start of speed,

    Yeah, that's what I meant when I said it's better to get a
    good run up, but the problem with twisty roads is that if
    you aren't familiar with the road it's often impossible to
    tell when an opportunity might present itself, and if you
    aren't ready for it then it's too late.

    Having good acceleration would help. I don't.

    >> I was following one guy doing 25

    > Perhaps his brakes had gone. Perhaps his suspension had
    > gone and he had a bad back. Perhaps...

    He was getting on in years.

    > People too readily assume that someone going a lot slower
    > or faster than they would is an idiot.

    Yep, most people don't consider the circumstances of the
    driver. There have been times when I've had to drive
    infuriatingly slowly because I've felt ill, or was
    transporting something fragile, or there was a problem with
    my car, etc, etc.

    Paul
    --
    http://www.wilderness-wales.co.uk
    http://www.wildwales.fsnet.co.uk
    http://www.photosig.com/go/users/userphotos?id=118749
     
  16. Gordon

    Gordon Guest

    Chris Malcolm <[email protected]> wrote
    > 50 or 60
    >>wouldn't have been out of place on that particular stretch
    >>of road - long, straight and out in the countryside.
    >
    >Perhaps his brakes had gone. Perhaps his suspension had
    >gone and he had a bad back. Perhaps...
    >
    He had drunk several measures of alcohol? :)

    >People too readily assume that someone going a lot slower
    >or faster than they would is an idiot.

    Returning home along a stretch of motorway on Tuesday, about
    11pm, in dry weather and good visibility, I noticed a very
    anonymous white van travelling at about 50 in the LH lane.
    Several car lengths behind him was a police traffic vehicle.
    I passed them, doing 70, and after a mile or so I saw the
    'blues' come on, and he was pulled over. I wasn't surprised,
    in fact I anticipated it.
    --
    Gordon
     
  17. Gordon

    Gordon Guest

    Steve Jones <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >Driving a police vehicle does not make the driver a good
    >one. There are good and bad out there, just as in any other
    >course of life. You should report instances such as this. I
    >can't guarantee that anything would happen in the first
    >instance, but if a particular driver is subject of a number
    >of complaints, his boss is going to have to take remedial
    >action. That is particularly the case today when everyting
    >is recorded and the option of not doing anything can be
    >later brought into question if that driver is involved in a
    >serious accident.
    >
    I am wondering how the matter of mobile phones held in the
    hand is going to be policed? Today I was following a car
    which turned onto an exit slip road, as though leaving the
    motorway, then suddenly veered back across the 'no-go'
    triangle of chevron lines and onto the motorway ahead of me.
    I gave warning of my presence close behind by sounding my
    horn, and overtook him, as he was travelling at less than my
    speed. I noticed then that he had his mobile phone to his
    ear, and the occasional glance in the mirror told me that he
    was continuing to rabbit as he reached the next junction and
    followed me off it, negotiating two sets of traffic lights
    thus, before making a right turn.

    I made a mental note of his number, and reflected that
    without some kind of public reporting of potential incidents
    caused by phone use, it will continue unchecked. What is
    really scary is that some of the most frequent users are 38
    tonners. I know this because I used to talk to them on Ham
    radio, until I decided it was not a good idea.

    Picture the situation - an HGV with the driver talking on
    Ham Radio or CB, having to say "Hang on a minute, I have to
    answer the phone"!
    --
    Gordon
     
  18. W. D. Grey

    W. D. Grey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Paul
    Saunders <[email protected]> writes
    >I do think that excessively slow drivers are partly to
    >blame though. I was following one guy doing 25 in the 30
    >zone and 30-35 in the 40 zone today. Yeah I know that 40 is
    >the limit and it's not compulsory to drive at that speed,
    >but it's still annoying, especially when 50 or 60 wouldn't
    >have been out of place on that particular stretch of road -
    >long, straight and out in the countryside.

    The Police do recommend that you drive below the speed limit
    to be certain of not breaking the law. Even in a 30mph you
    may only do so provided it is safe so to do. You can be done
    for dangerous driving even if you are below 30 in the 30
    zone - it all depends on the prevailing conditions.

    25 in the 30 zone is a bit naff though, say 28 would
    have been O.K.

    My main gripe is that different Authorities have differing
    speed limits in similar circumstances.
    --
    Bill Grey http://www.billboy.co.uk
     
  19. W. D. Grey wrote:

    > The Police do recommend that you drive below the speed
    > limit to be certain of not breaking the law. Even in a
    > 30mph you may only do so provided it is safe so to do.

    True, but in this case it was quite safe to do so. It was
    certainly safe to do 40 in the 40 zone, and faster too.

    I didn't pass him anyway, I was driving in philosophical
    mode, which I thought was remarkly disciplined of me
    considering that I was in a rush at the time.

    Paul
    --
    http://www.wilderness-wales.co.uk
    http://www.wildwales.fsnet.co.uk
    http://www.photosig.com/go/users/userphotos?id=118749
     
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