GPS Systems

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Nathan, Apr 26, 2003.

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  1. Nathan

    Nathan Guest

    Hello,

    I am looking at GPS systems. I noticed the new Lowrance has a MMC or SD option. Is that a pretty
    good deal?

    What about the eTrek? Which version is OK?

    Are there any pretty reasonable GPS systems for under $200?

    Thanks, Nathan Gifford Tickfaw, LA
     
    Tags:


  2. Garmin has some systems for under $200. I recently purchased 5 of the Garmin eMap Deluxe on-line for
    $195 each. They came with an 8 meg memory card and a PC interface cable. They have some maps already
    built into them. I purchased the Garmin "MapSource Roads and Recreation" maps for about $100. I
    turned the units over to my Survey Crews. We loaded the road maps for our county and the surrounding
    4 counties. This only took up about 3 megs of space.

    So far I have been happy with the units. I own a Garmin GPS III plus that I purchased about 3 or 4
    years ago. It has been a fairly robust system.

    I have been able to store destinations in the unit and then turn it over to my wife so she can meet
    me at my destination. It has been nice to have an interactive road map.

    Good Luck.

    William Higley, Sr. Vision R-50

    "Nathan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am looking at GPS systems. I noticed the new Lowrance has a MMC or SD option. Is that a pretty
    > good deal?
    >
    > What about the eTrek? Which version is OK?
    >
    > Are there any pretty reasonable GPS systems for under $200?
    >
    > Thanks, Nathan Gifford Tickfaw, LA
     
  3. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    You could take a look at this page:

    http://gpsinformation.net/

    But it may have the effect of so confusing and overwhelming you that you will give up on the idea
    entirely ;-) I think it is having that effect on me.

    johnriley1 (at) rogers.com
     
  4. Nathan

    Nathan Guest

    It looks like a pretty good unit. Opinions?

    Nathan Gifford
     
  5. David Bogie

    David Bogie Guest

    Beware the urge to buy gadgets. Do you REALLY need a gps for your riding style and routes? Do you
    want another computer to learn? Will you use more than 10% of the features and capabilities of gps?

    Whate else could you buy with that $200 that would make your bikes safer, more comfortable, or more
    fun to ride?

    You may be one of those rare gearheads who like to dabble with gps. Buy it. But buy the next bigger
    one because you will outgrow the entry unit within weeks.

    I know lots of people with gps units. I know very few who have taken the time to learn to use them
    for more than glorified Cateye Astrales -- but without the cadence feature of the Astrale. My
    Astrale was $35.

    david boise ID

    "Nathan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am looking at GPS systems. I noticed the new Lowrance has a MMC or SD option. Is that a pretty
    > good deal?
    >
    > What about the eTrek? Which version is OK?
    >
    > Are there any pretty reasonable GPS systems for under $200?
    >
    > Thanks, Nathan Gifford Tickfaw, LA
     
  6. Bob

    Bob Guest

  7. Nathan

    Nathan Guest

    Thanks Dave. Couldn't agree with you more.

    No I would not consider getting one just for the bike! I really wish I did not have to get one at
    all, but that appears to longer be an option. Good news is that it does not need to be 100% reliable
    or that anyone's life depends on it functioning.

    So, as long as I must, and I have an option on which one to get, whatta think of the iFinder for
    bicycle use? Looks like a decent enough unit judging from what I have read on the Internet....
    "David Bogie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Beware the urge to buy gadgets. Do you REALLY need a gps for your riding style and routes? Do
    > you want another computer to learn? Will you use more than 10% of the features and
    > capabilities of gps?
    >
    > Whate else could you buy with that $200 that would make your bikes safer, more comfortable, or
    > more fun to ride?
    >
    > You may be one of those rare gearheads who like to dabble with gps. Buy it. But buy the next
    > bigger one because you will outgrow the entry unit within weeks.
    >
    > I know lots of people with gps units. I know very few who have taken the time to learn to use them
    > for more than glorified Cateye Astrales -- but without the cadence feature of the Astrale. My
    > Astrale was $35.
    >
    > david boise ID
    >
    > "Nathan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > I am looking at GPS systems. I noticed the new Lowrance has a MMC or SD option. Is that a pretty
    > > good deal?
    > >
    > > What about the eTrek? Which version is OK?
    > >
    > > Are there any pretty reasonable GPS systems for under $200?
    > >
    > > Thanks, Nathan Gifford Tickfaw, LA
     
  8. Brian Hughes

    Brian Hughes Guest

    > Are there any pretty reasonable GPS systems for under $200?
    >

    Another idea would be to look at a Garmin Geko 201, I paid about $120. I believe it is the smallest
    GPS around and you can buy it with a bike mounting kit. It works very very well for my needs, which
    is mainly as a trip computer with numerous display options: Elev, heading, lat/lon, max speed,
    speed, mov aver, trip time, time stop, time moving, odometer, etc. It even has a few games on it. It
    also has most of the other things you expect in a GPS unit--navigation, maps, routes, .... , but I
    rarely use those features. Best of all, it isn't much bigger and doesn't weigh more than some bike
    computers.

    On the negative side, since it's so small, the display screen isn't huge. So if you do want to use
    the mapping feature displays, you probably want a bigger unit with a bigger display. It also runs on
    "AAA" batteries--which means they only last about 12 hours or so if you leave it on continuously.

    Brian
     
  9. Rorschandt

    Rorschandt Guest

    "brian hughes" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >>
    >> Are there any pretty reasonable GPS systems for under $200?
    >>
    >
    > Another idea would be to look at a Garmin Geko 201, I paid about $120. I believe it is the
    > smallest GPS around and you can buy it with a bike mounting kit. It works very very well for my
    > needs, which is mainly as a trip computer with numerous display options: Elev, heading, lat/lon,
    > max speed, speed, mov aver, trip time, time stop, time moving, odometer, etc. It even has a few
    > games on it. It also has most of the other things you expect in a GPS unit--navigation, maps,
    > routes, .... , but I rarely use those features. Best of all, it isn't much bigger and doesn't
    > weigh more than some bike computers.

    I have a Garmin E-trex Legend. Should you want a bigger screen, you can also connect to a
    laptop computer. I'm not suggesting this particular set- up for a bike...but if that's what you
    want to do...(~:

    Personally, I think a GPS is way too much money and messing around if you aren't going to use the
    navigation functions. A simple bike computer that is quite accurate can be had for like U$20.
    Under some circumstances, the GPS will not give as accurate an account of speed and distance as a
    bike computer.

    rorschandt
     
  10. M..Leuck

    M..Leuck Guest

    "Nathan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am looking at GPS systems. I noticed the new Lowrance has a MMC or SD option. Is that a pretty
    > good deal?
    >
    > What about the eTrek? Which version is OK?
    >
    > Are there any pretty reasonable GPS systems for under $200?
    >
    > Thanks, Nathan Gifford Tickfaw, LA

    Not sure about under $300 but I have a Garmin III+ which works pretty well, seems to have a slightly
    bigger screen than any eTrek I've seen
     
  11. Freewheeling

    Freewheeling Guest

    I think the eTrex Legend sells for under $200. I have to be honest, I have the Vista but rarely look
    at the Map. Generally I just program routes and waypoints using Mapsource, and then go by the course
    pointer. I can count on my fingers the number of times the map has actually come in handy.

    --
    --Scott [email protected] Cut the "tail" to send email.

    "William Higley, Sr." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Garmin has some systems for under $200. I recently purchased 5 of the
    Garmin
    > eMap Deluxe on-line for $195 each. They came with an 8 meg memory card and
    a
    > PC interface cable. They have some maps already built into them. I
    purchased
    > the Garmin "MapSource Roads and Recreation" maps for about $100. I turned the units over to my
    > Survey Crews. We loaded the road maps for our county and the surrounding 4 counties. This only
    > took up about 3 megs of space.
    >
    > So far I have been happy with the units. I own a Garmin GPS III plus that
    I
    > purchased about 3 or 4 years ago. It has been a fairly robust system.
    >
    > I have been able to store destinations in the unit and then turn it over
    to
    > my wife so she can meet me at my destination. It has been nice to have an interactive road map.
    >
    > Good Luck.
    >
    > William Higley, Sr. Vision R-50
    >
    > "Nathan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > I am looking at GPS systems. I noticed the new Lowrance has a MMC or SD option. Is that a pretty
    > > good deal?
    > >
    > > What about the eTrek? Which version is OK?
    > >
    > > Are there any pretty reasonable GPS systems for under $200?
    > >
    > > Thanks, Nathan Gifford Tickfaw, LA
    > >
    >
     
  12. Freewheeling

    Freewheeling Guest

    ror:

    Then there's the battery problem. The bike computer battery is small, and will last a season. The
    GPS batteries are usually AAs and last a few hours. I've also had the GPS stop working if I go over
    a bump, because the battery loses contact for an instant. Have tried all kinds of things to keep
    that from happening, but nothing is really reliable.

    --
    --Scott [email protected] Cut the "tail" to send email.

    "rorschandt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "brian hughes" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > >>
    > >> Are there any pretty reasonable GPS systems for under $200?
    > >>
    > >
    > > Another idea would be to look at a Garmin Geko 201, I paid about $120. I believe it is the
    > > smallest GPS around and you can buy it with a bike mounting kit. It works very very well for my
    > > needs, which is mainly as a trip computer with numerous display options: Elev, heading, lat/lon,
    > > max speed, speed, mov aver, trip time, time stop, time moving, odometer, etc. It even has a few
    > > games on it. It also has most of the other things you expect in a GPS unit--navigation, maps,
    > > routes, .... , but I rarely use those features. Best of all, it isn't much bigger and doesn't
    > > weigh more than some bike computers.
    >
    >
    > I have a Garmin E-trex Legend. Should you want a bigger screen, you can also connect to a laptop
    > computer. I'm not suggesting this particular set- up for a bike...but if that's what you want to
    > do...(~:
    >
    > Personally, I think a GPS is way too much money and messing around if you aren't going to use the
    > navigation functions. A simple bike computer that is quite accurate can be had for like U$20.
    > Under some circumstances, the GPS will not give as accurate an account of speed and distance as a
    > bike computer.
    >
    > rorschandt
     
  13. rorschandt <[email protected]> wrote:
    : I have a Garmin E-trex Legend. Should you want a bigger screen, you can also connect to a laptop
    : computer. I'm not suggesting this particular set- up for a bike...but if that's what you want to
    : do...(~:

    Well, bikes are obsolete anyway ;)

    Why don't we just connect all the sensors - GPS, wheel & crank, radio network - to a PC and have a
    nice integrated system which automatically produces complicated statistics about your rides? Not all
    PCs are big noisy boxes that consume 300W... and then there are other kinds of computers as well...

    For those folks that are going to ask if I've seen the Behemoth page and posting the link to
    it, yes, I've read about it... I notice the symptoms of the syndrome but I can stop at any
    time I want...

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  14. Nathan

    Nathan Guest

    Well its iFinder....Paid $149.00. + $30 for 64MB SD card.

    I do not know if its the best for the money, but it is a start.

    Tips are still welcomed (like mapping s/w).

    Thanks to all for the help, Nathan Gifford Tickfaw, LA USA
     
  15. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    rorschandt <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>... [...] > A simple bike computer that
    > is quite accurate can be had for like U$20. Under some circumstances, the GPS will not give as
    > accurate an account of speed and distance as a bike computer.

    I am sure there will be people who will say that they have a bike computer that is very acurate,
    reliable, easy to use, etc. but that has not been my experience.

    A recumbent often means a long wire kit. And if you have more than one recumbent, that means more
    long wire kits. And they only work on bikes; you can't use them for walking.

    OTOH I have been known to ride under a few trees from time to time!

    Johnriley1 (at) rogers.com
     
  16. R.White

    R.White Guest

    [email protected] (David Bogie) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Beware the urge to buy gadgets. Do you REALLY need a gps for your riding style and routes? Do
    > you want another computer to learn? Will you use more than 10% of the features and
    > capabilities of gps?
    >
    > Whate else could you buy with that $200 that would make your bikes safer, more comfortable, or
    > more fun to ride?
    >
    > You may be one of those rare gearheads who like to dabble with gps. Buy it. But buy the next
    > bigger one because you will outgrow the entry unit within weeks.
    >
    > I know lots of people with gps units. I know very few who have taken the time to learn to use them
    > for more than glorified Cateye Astrales -- but without the cadence feature of the Astrale. My
    > Astrale was $35.
    >
    > david boise ID

    My GPS was $100 and I use it on 4 different bikes as well as on my kayak and while hiking/walking.
    An Astrale would be useless on the water and hiking trails. I say get the GPS if you have multiple
    activities you want to keep track of.

    >
    > "Nathan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > I am looking at GPS systems. I noticed the new Lowrance has a MMC or SD option. Is that a pretty
    > > good deal?
    > >
    > > What about the eTrek? Which version is OK?
    > >
    > > Are there any pretty reasonable GPS systems for under $200?
    > >
    > > Thanks, Nathan Gifford Tickfaw, LA
     
  17. Brian Hughes

    Brian Hughes Guest

    > Personally, I think a GPS is way too much money and messing around if you aren't going to use the
    > navigation functions. A simple bike computer that is quite accurate can be had for like U$20.
    > Under some circumstances, the GPS will not give as accurate an account of speed and distance as a
    > bike computer.

    Probably so in most cases, but I really wanted to see elevation, since I ride in mountain areas. No
    $20 bike computer has elevation. Plus I own 4 bikes and ride them all, and they all have different
    wheel sizes. It's nice to just take the GPS unit with you and not worry about calibrating a bike
    computer (or 4 of them).

    BTW, the Geko also has an RS-232 interface (but the cable costs extra), so you can still have plenty
    of fun with it if you're really into techno geeky stuff.

    Brian
     
  18. M..Leuck

    M..Leuck Guest

    "Freewheeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > ror:
    >
    > Then there's the battery problem. The bike computer battery is small, and will last a season. The
    > GPS batteries are usually AAs and last a few
    hours.
    > I've also had the GPS stop working if I go over a bump, because the
    battery
    > loses contact for an instant. Have tried all kinds of things to keep that from happening, but
    > nothing is really reliable.

    If thats a Garmin they make a "sport" kit for it, it's a spring piece that goes between
    the batteries
     
  19. M..Leuck

    M..Leuck Guest

    "Freewheeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I think the eTrex Legend sells for under $200. I have to be honest, I
    have
    > the Vista but rarely look at the Map. Generally I just program routes and waypoints using
    > Mapsource, and then go by the course pointer. I can count on my fingers the number of times the
    > map has actually come in handy.
    >
    > --
    > --Scott [email protected] Cut the "tail" to send email.

    Since I do a lot of city riding I love the map, gives me alternative route options
     
  20. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    brian hughes wrote:
    >
    > ... It also runs on "AAA" batteries...

    Also known as LR-03.

    Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
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