gps with google maps

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Simon Proven, Sep 7, 2005.

  1. Simon Proven

    Simon Proven Guest

    Tags:


  2. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Simon Proven
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    >
    > I did a tour last year (23-31 Aug). See the route at:
    >
    > http://sproven.homedns.org/maps/route.php?id=16
    >
    > Don't all look at once, you'll kill the server :)


    That really is very cool. In fact I'd say that Google Maps is one of the
    really interesting new technologies of this year. What software are you
    using for your GPS data -> googlemap conversion, and is it open source?

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; making jokes about dyslexia isn't big, it isn't clever and
    ;; it isn't furry.
     
  3. Simon Proven

    Simon Proven Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > That really is very cool.


    Thanks. I'd been meaning to do something along those lines for a
    while, once I realised the possibilities.

    > In fact I'd say that Google Maps is one of the
    > really interesting new technologies of this year. What software are you
    > using for your GPS data -> googlemap conversion, and is it open source?


    Yes (for the most part). It can all be made entirely open source in
    any case.

    I had the GPS tracklog as a Tracklogs Digital Mapping route which I'd
    originally uploaded from the GPS (Garmin eTrex Vista) back last year.
    I converted that to .gpx using a shareware utility called GPSUtility,
    but I believe open source is available for this kind of thing if you
    were going from the Garmin format or whatever. I then used python
    and pyxml to convert the .gpx into SQL queries, as I'm running MySQL
    as the backend. That stage is rather slow, due to the slow XML
    handling
    and the speed of the box (it's an old pc converted to server/firewall
    use) but it doesn't matter just now as it's a one-time thing. I
    could use XSLT (but would have to learn it first).

    >From that, routes.php extracts the route names and indexes from

    the database, and builds an html table to display a list of them,
    and route.php extracts all the lat, lon points from the database
    and spits out an html file. The conversion is then a matter of
    building a GPoint array from the base arrays lats[] and lons[].

    One thing I found was that the google maps stuff doesn't like very
    long polylines. The js thus converts the route into segments of
    at most 20 (it could be more, probably, I've not experimented yet)
    and spits them out. The route in question is 5539 points (some
    sections are from saved tracks, and the last bit is from the active
    log so the points are more frequent).

    I would be happy to share what I've developed, if it would be
    useful to others, though it's all quite early stages just now.
    One idea is to allow adding notes to the route, so it would become
    a bit like a gps-enabled cycling blog. Pictures taken at points
    on the route could also be served.

    In the longer term I would have to move the server to somewhere
    more practical too. What would be nice is if I could set up
    a server and provide a route sharing service, based on the SQL
    backend.

    Simon

    PS Since I posted I've had one hacking attempt so far that
    I can see from the access logs, but it failed. I should move
    to using a proper hosting service, but need to at least have
    sql and scripting to access it.
     
  4. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Simon
    Proven ('[email protected]') wrote:

    >
    > Simon Brooke wrote:
    >> That really is very cool.

    >
    > Thanks. I'd been meaning to do something along those lines for a
    > while, once I realised the possibilities.
    >
    >> In fact I'd say that Google Maps is one of the
    >> really interesting new technologies of this year. What software are
    >> you using for your GPS data -> googlemap conversion, and is it open
    >> source?

    >
    > Yes (for the most part). It can all be made entirely open source in
    > any case.
    >
    > I had the GPS tracklog as a Tracklogs Digital Mapping route which I'd
    > originally uploaded from the GPS (Garmin eTrex Vista) back last year.
    > I converted that to .gpx using a shareware utility called GPSUtility,
    > but I believe open source is available for this kind of thing if you
    > were going from the Garmin format or whatever. I then used python
    > and pyxml to convert the .gpx into SQL queries, as I'm running MySQL
    > as the backend. That stage is rather slow, due to the slow XML
    > handling
    > and the speed of the box (it's an old pc converted to server/firewall
    > use) but it doesn't matter just now as it's a one-time thing. I
    > could use XSLT (but would have to learn it first).


    XSLT is very, very wonderful, but takes a bit of getting your mind
    around. In fact it ought to be fairly simple to write an XSL transform
    which eats GPX and spits out HTML with the JavaScript for the GPoints in
    it directly, without any need to go through the database.

    Could you bung me a sample epx file to play with? My email address isn't
    munged.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    ;; Our modern industrial economy takes a mountain covered with trees,
    ;; lakes, running streams and transforms it into a mountain of junk,
    ;; garbage, slime pits, and debris. -- Edward Abbey
     
  5. elyob

    elyob Guest

    "Simon Proven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Simon Brooke wrote:
    >> That really is very cool.

    >
    > Thanks. I'd been meaning to do something along those lines for a
    > while, once I realised the possibilities.
    >
    >> In fact I'd say that Google Maps is one of the
    >> really interesting new technologies of this year. What software are you
    >> using for your GPS data -> googlemap conversion, and is it open source?

    >
    > Yes (for the most part). It can all be made entirely open source in
    > any case.
    >
    > I had the GPS tracklog as a Tracklogs Digital Mapping route which I'd
    > originally uploaded from the GPS (Garmin eTrex Vista) back last year.
    > I converted that to .gpx using a shareware utility called GPSUtility,
    > but I believe open source is available for this kind of thing if you
    > were going from the Garmin format or whatever. I then used python
    > and pyxml to convert the .gpx into SQL queries, as I'm running MySQL
    > as the backend. That stage is rather slow, due to the slow XML
    > handling
    > and the speed of the box (it's an old pc converted to server/firewall
    > use) but it doesn't matter just now as it's a one-time thing. I
    > could use XSLT (but would have to learn it first).
    >
    >>From that, routes.php extracts the route names and indexes from

    > the database, and builds an html table to display a list of them,
    > and route.php extracts all the lat, lon points from the database
    > and spits out an html file. The conversion is then a matter of
    > building a GPoint array from the base arrays lats[] and lons[].
    >
    > One thing I found was that the google maps stuff doesn't like very
    > long polylines. The js thus converts the route into segments of
    > at most 20 (it could be more, probably, I've not experimented yet)
    > and spits them out. The route in question is 5539 points (some
    > sections are from saved tracks, and the last bit is from the active
    > log so the points are more frequent).
    >
    > I would be happy to share what I've developed, if it would be
    > useful to others, though it's all quite early stages just now.
    > One idea is to allow adding notes to the route, so it would become
    > a bit like a gps-enabled cycling blog. Pictures taken at points
    > on the route could also be served.
    >
    > In the longer term I would have to move the server to somewhere
    > more practical too. What would be nice is if I could set up
    > a server and provide a route sharing service, based on the SQL
    > backend.
    >
    > Simon
    >
    > PS Since I posted I've had one hacking attempt so far that
    > I can see from the access logs, but it failed. I should move
    > to using a proper hosting service, but need to at least have
    > sql and scripting to access it.
    >


    I've been mucking about with it to. It'd be great to cover the official
    tracks. e.g. you can see the Downs Link cycle here ...
    http://fishpluschips.com/GPS/gpsmap.php
     
  6. Arnaud

    Arnaud Guest

    On 08/09/2005 16:16, Simon Brooke wrote:
    >
    > XSLT is very, very wonderful, but takes a bit of getting your mind
    > around. In fact it ought to be fairly simple to write an XSL transform
    > which eats GPX and spits out HTML with the JavaScript for the GPoints in
    > it directly, without any need to go through the database.
    >


    Indeed, it's been done already:

    http://cse-mjmcl.cse.bris.ac.uk/blog/2005/07/26/1122414882406.html

    Arnaud.
     
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