Grains A Good Thing: Whole-grains are part of the vegetarian diet that can be used to successfully

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by [email protected], Feb 27, 2006.

  1. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Sep;78(3 Suppl):610S-616S.

    Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet.
    http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/78/3/610S

    Jenkins DJ, Kendall CW, Marchie A, Jenkins AL, Augustin LS, Ludwig DS,
    Barnard ND, Anderson JW.

    Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's
    Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

    "Based on what is known of the components of plant-based diets and
    their effects from cohort studies, there is reason to believe that
    vegetarian diets would have advantages in the treatment of type 2
    diabetes. At present there are few data on vegetarian diets in diabetes
    that do not in addition have weight loss or exercise components.
    Nevertheless, the use of whole-grain or traditionally processed cereals
    and legumes has been associated with improved glycemic control in both
    diabetic and insulin-resistant individuals. Long-term cohort studies
    have indicated that whole-grain consumption reduces the risk of both
    type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, nuts (eg,
    almonds), viscous fibers (eg, fibers from oats and barley), soy
    proteins, and plant sterols, which may be part of the vegetarian diet,
    reduce serum lipids. In combination, these plant food components may
    have a very significant impact on cardiovascular disease, one of the
    major complications of diabetes. Furthermore, substituting soy or other
    vegetable proteins for animal protein may also decrease renal
    hyperfiltration, proteinuria, and renal acid load and in the long term
    reduce the risk of developing renal disease in type 2 diabetes. The
    vegetarian diet, therefore, contains a portfolio of natural products
    and food forms of benefit for both the carbohydrate and lipid
    abnormalities in diabetes. It is anticipated that their combined use in
    vegetarian diets will produce very significant metabolic advantages for
    the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its complications."

    PMID: 12936955
    http://naturalhealthperspective.com/food/whole-grains.html
    --
    John Gohde,
    Achieving good Nutrition is an Art, NOT a Science!

    The nutrition of eating a healthy diet is a biological factor of the
    mind-body connection. Now, weighing in at 18 web pages, the
    Nutrition of a Healthy Diet is with more documentation and
    sharper terminology than ever before.
    http://naturalhealthperspective.com/food/
     
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  2. Cubit

    Cubit Guest

    Grains are poison.
     
  3. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Cubit wrote:
    :: Grains are poison.

    Amen, brother.
     
  4. jt

    jt Guest

    On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 00:21:28 GMT, "Cubit" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Grains are poison.
    >

    apparently a very slow acting one taking sometimes more than 100 years
    to kill its victim.
     
  5. Joe

    Joe Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Sep;78(3 Suppl):610S-616S.
    >
    > Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet.
    > http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/78/3/610S
    >
    > Jenkins DJ, Kendall CW, Marchie A, Jenkins AL, Augustin LS, Ludwig DS,
    > Barnard ND, Anderson JW.
    >
    > Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's
    > Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    >
    > "Based on what is known of the components of plant-based diets and
    > their effects from cohort studies, there is reason to believe that
    > vegetarian diets would have advantages in the treatment of type 2
    > diabetes. At present there are few data on vegetarian diets in diabetes
    > that do not in addition have weight loss or exercise components.
    > Nevertheless, the use of whole-grain or traditionally processed cereals
    > and legumes has been associated with improved glycemic control in both
    > diabetic and insulin-resistant individuals. Long-term cohort studies
    > have indicated that whole-grain consumption reduces the risk of both
    > type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, nuts (eg,
    > almonds), viscous fibers (eg, fibers from oats and barley), soy
    > proteins, and plant sterols, which may be part of the vegetarian diet,
    > reduce serum lipids. In combination, these plant food components may
    > have a very significant impact on cardiovascular disease, one of the
    > major complications of diabetes. Furthermore, substituting soy or other
    > vegetable proteins for animal protein may also decrease renal
    > hyperfiltration, proteinuria, and renal acid load and in the long term
    > reduce the risk of developing renal disease in type 2 diabetes.


    There's quite a bit of research available which shows humans are not well
    adapted to eating grains. As for soy, type in soy, dangerous and unhealthy
    into a search engine and start reading, quite an eye opener.
     
  6. Joe wrote:
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Sep;78(3 Suppl):610S-616S.
    > >
    > > Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet.
    > > http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/78/3/610S
    > >
    > > Jenkins DJ, Kendall CW, Marchie A, Jenkins AL, Augustin LS, Ludwig DS,
    > > Barnard ND, Anderson JW.
    > >
    > > Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's
    > > Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    > >
    > > "Based on what is known of the components of plant-based diets and
    > > their effects from cohort studies, there is reason to believe that
    > > vegetarian diets would have advantages in the treatment of type 2
    > > diabetes. At present there are few data on vegetarian diets in diabetes
    > > that do not in addition have weight loss or exercise components.
    > > Nevertheless, the use of whole-grain or traditionally processed cereals
    > > and legumes has been associated with improved glycemic control in both
    > > diabetic and insulin-resistant individuals. Long-term cohort studies
    > > have indicated that whole-grain consumption reduces the risk of both
    > > type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, nuts (eg,
    > > almonds), viscous fibers (eg, fibers from oats and barley), soy
    > > proteins, and plant sterols, which may be part of the vegetarian diet,
    > > reduce serum lipids. In combination, these plant food components may
    > > have a very significant impact on cardiovascular disease, one of the
    > > major complications of diabetes. Furthermore, substituting soy or other
    > > vegetable proteins for animal protein may also decrease renal
    > > hyperfiltration, proteinuria, and renal acid load and in the long term
    > > reduce the risk of developing renal disease in type 2 diabetes.

    >
    > There's quite a bit of research available which shows humans are not well
    > adapted to eating grains. As for soy, type in soy, dangerous and unhealthy
    > into a search engine and start reading, quite an eye opener.


    Actually, that is a total myth.

    That stuff reads like a fairy tale and was publish in some pretty far
    out journals.

    Just my opinion, but I am NEVER wrong.

    Feel free to prove me wrong.
     
  7. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Joe wrote:
    :: <[email protected]> wrote in message
    :: news:[email protected]
    ::: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Sep;78(3 Suppl):610S-616S.
    :::
    ::: Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet.
    ::: http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/78/3/610S
    :::
    ::: Jenkins DJ, Kendall CW, Marchie A, Jenkins AL, Augustin LS, Ludwig
    ::: DS, Barnard ND, Anderson JW.
    :::
    ::: Clinical Nutrition & Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's
    ::: Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    :::
    ::: "Based on what is known of the components of plant-based diets and
    ::: their effects from cohort studies, there is reason to believe that
    ::: vegetarian diets would have advantages in the treatment of type 2
    ::: diabetes.

    What exactly is a vegetarian diet? Pasta, rice, and potatoes without fat?

    At present there are few data on vegetarian diets in
    ::: diabetes that do not in addition have weight loss or exercise
    ::: components. Nevertheless, the use of whole-grain or traditionally
    ::: processed cereals and legumes has been associated with improved
    ::: glycemic control in both diabetic and insulin-resistant
    ::: individuals.

    Compared to what? Fruit loops and juice in the mornings?

    Long-term cohort studies have indicated that
    ::: whole-grain consumption reduces the risk of both type 2 diabetes
    ::: and cardiovascular disease.

    Compared to what?

    In addition, nuts (eg, almonds),
    ::: viscous fibers (eg, fibers from oats and barley), soy proteins, and
    ::: plant sterols, which may be part of the vegetarian diet, reduce
    ::: serum lipids.

    Nuts can be a part of any lowcarbers diet, too. Also, these items may not
    be part of a "vegetarian" diet.

    In combination, these plant food components may have
    ::: a very significant impact on cardiovascular disease, one of the
    ::: major complications of diabetes.

    may, may, may, may, may, may, may, may,..........

    As if that proves jack...

    Furthermore, substituting soy or
    ::: other vegetable proteins for animal protein may also decrease renal
    ::: hyperfiltration, proteinuria, and renal acid load and in the long
    ::: term reduce the risk of developing renal disease in type 2
    ::: diabetes.

    Without looking at the remaining composition of the diet, such statements
    are completely meaningless.

    All of that being said, I do think at type 2 can do well on a vegetarian
    diet. However, one would need to be careful in what is included in that
    diet. Standard fare probably won't work.

    However, IMO, a better diet for most would be a real low-carb diet that
    includes plenty of fibrous veggies and few, if any, whole grains. Exercise
    would definitely be part of the lifestyle, too.
     
  8. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    On Mon, 27 Feb 2006 20:23:17 -0500, George Cherry wrote in
    <news:[email protected]> on
    alt.support.diet.low-carb,alt.support.diet.paleolithic,alt.health.diabetes,misc.health.diabetes,sci.med.nutrition
    :

    > "Cubit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Grains are poison.

    >
    > Holy shit! I've been poisoned!


    And I am dead without knowing it! Ouch!

    X'Posted to: alt.support.diet.low-carb,alt.support.diet.paleolithic,alt.health.diabetes,misc.health.diabetes,sci.med.nutrition
     
  9. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 05:33:33 GMT, Joe wrote in
    <news:[email protected]> on
    alt.support.diet.low-carb,alt.support.diet.paleolithic,alt.health.diabetes,misc.health.diabetes,sci.med.nutrition
    :

    > There's quite a bit of research available which shows humans are not well
    > adapted to eating grains.


    Indeed, some are intolerant to wheat.
    Some other people are intolerant to lactose.
    Others are allergic to peanuts.
    Others just can't stand meat...

    So what?



    > As for soy, type in soy, dangerous and unhealthy
    > into a search engine and start reading, quite an eye opener.


    Do you trust anything from "a search engine"?

    X'Posted to: alt.support.diet.low-carb,alt.support.diet.paleolithic,alt.health.diabetes,misc.health.diabetes,sci.med.nutrition
     
  10. Carmen

    Carmen Guest

    Alright John,
    Enough with the procrastination. Have you cleared out all that junk
    food yet? Are you ready to get serious? You're still here, so you
    want to make that change. Step up to the plate - not that one either.
    ;-)

    Carmen
     
  11. [email protected] wrote:
    > Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Sep;78(3 Suppl):610S-616S.
    >
    > Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet.
    > http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/78/3/610S
    >
    > Jenkins DJ, Kendall CW, Marchie A, Jenkins AL, Augustin LS, Ludwig DS,
    > Barnard ND, Anderson JW.


    David J.A. Jenkins, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Nutritional Sciences,
    University of Toronto. Evaluated potential health benefits of oil
    seeds, such as soy and flaxseed, partially funded by the
    University-Industry Partnership Program of the Natural Sciences and
    Engineering Research Council of Canada and Omega Nutrition Canada. (Am.
    J. Clin. Nutr. 1999;69:395-402)

    James W. Anderson, University of Kentucky and the Veterans Affairs
    Medical Center, Lexington. Research on the cholesterol-lowering effects
    of psyllium funded by Procter & Gamble Company. (Am. J. Clin. Nutr.
    2000;71:1433-8) Research on psyllium on glucose and serum lipid
    responses in men with type 2 diabetes and hypercholesterolemia, funded
    by Procter & Gamble Company. (Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 2000;70:466-73)
    Research on the difference in cognitive development between breast-fed
    and formula-fed children, funded by Martek Biosciences Corporation and
    HCF Nutrition Foundation. (AM. J. Clin. Nutr. 2000;70:525- 35) Research
    on using Orlistat for weight maintenance funded by F Hoffmann-La Roche.
    (Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 1999;69:1108-16)Research on yogurt and cholesterol
    supported by Campina Melkunie. (J. Am. Col. of Nutr. 1999;18:43-9)
    Research on type 2 diabetes mellitus supported in part by Roche
    Vitamins. (J. Amer. Coll. Nutr. 1999;18:451-61)

    And ND Barnard -

    http://www.animalscam.com/sources.cfm

    http://www.consumerfreedom.com/news_list.cfm?topic=8&page=12

    http://www.peta-sucks.com/whatispeta.htm

    *************

    TC
     
  12. Simm Webb

    Simm Webb Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Sep;78(3 Suppl):610S-616S.
    >>
    >>Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet.
    >>http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/78/3/610S
    >>
    >>Jenkins DJ, Kendall CW, Marchie A, Jenkins AL, Augustin LS, Ludwig DS,
    >>Barnard ND, Anderson JW.

    >
    >
    > David J.A. Jenkins, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Nutritional Sciences,
    > University of Toronto. Evaluated potential health benefits of oil
    > seeds, such as soy and flaxseed, partially funded by the
    > University-Industry Partnership Program of the Natural Sciences and
    > Engineering Research Council of Canada and Omega Nutrition Canada. (Am.
    > J. Clin. Nutr. 1999;69:395-402)
    >

    It is obvious that none of these people have heard of diverculitis.
    How come I have?
     
  13. Juhana Harju

    Juhana Harju Guest

    Simm Webb wrote:
    : [email protected] wrote:
    :: [email protected] wrote:
    ::
    ::: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Sep;78(3 Suppl):610S-616S.
    :::
    ::: Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet.
    ::: http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/78/3/610S
    :::
    ::: Jenkins DJ, Kendall CW, Marchie A, Jenkins AL, Augustin LS, Ludwig
    ::: DS, Barnard ND, Anderson JW.
    ::
    ::
    :: David J.A. Jenkins, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Nutritional Sciences,
    :: University of Toronto. Evaluated potential health benefits of oil
    :: seeds, such as soy and flaxseed, partially funded by the
    :: University-Industry Partnership Program of the Natural Sciences and
    :: Engineering Research Council of Canada and Omega Nutrition Canada.
    :: (Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 1999;69:395-402)
    ::
    : It is obvious that none of these people have heard of diverculitis.
    : How come I have?

    And your point was?

    --
    Juhana
     
  14. TC

    TC Guest

    Juhana Harju wrote:
    > Simm Webb wrote:
    > : [email protected] wrote:
    > :: [email protected] wrote:
    > ::
    > ::: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Sep;78(3 Suppl):610S-616S.
    > :::
    > ::: Type 2 diabetes and the vegetarian diet.
    > ::: http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/78/3/610S
    > :::
    > ::: Jenkins DJ, Kendall CW, Marchie A, Jenkins AL, Augustin LS, Ludwig
    > ::: DS, Barnard ND, Anderson JW.
    > ::
    > ::
    > :: David J.A. Jenkins, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Nutritional Sciences,
    > :: University of Toronto. Evaluated potential health benefits of oil
    > :: seeds, such as soy and flaxseed, partially funded by the
    > :: University-Industry Partnership Program of the Natural Sciences and
    > :: Engineering Research Council of Canada and Omega Nutrition Canada.
    > :: (Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 1999;69:395-402)
    > ::
    > : It is obvious that none of these people have heard of diverculitis.
    > : How come I have?
    >
    > And your point was?
    >
    > --
    > Juhana


    Like Colitis and Crohn's, grains are the problem.

    TC
     
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