Grease! so many rumors!

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Greg-O, Dec 28, 2003.

  1. Greg-O

    Greg-O New Member

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    I have heard so many rumors about grease.

    "don't use lithium grease on your seatpost"
    "don't use moly grease"
    "don't use phil wood on alluminum or titanium"
    "only use bike grease"
    "use different grease for your bearings than your seatpost"

    Anyways, for the point of this thread.
    Tomorrow I am going to buy some grease (and anti-seize). I want a grease that i can use on everything. Bearings, seatpost, installing my BB and crank. What kind should I get, and why?
     
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  2. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    It's all hooey. Can't go wrong with a quality bike grease,but you will pay more. Major brand synthetic waterproof marine grease from wallymart works for everything.
     
  3. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    For bearings: grease
    For threads, stems, seat post: anti-sieze
    You can use one grease for everyting, but anti-sieze works best in the non-bearing applications.

    Different greases have different amounts of thickness.
    Thicker tends to last longer, but it also has a very small amount of additional friction in bearing surfaces.
    "Major brand synthetic waterproof marine grease from wallymart" or you auto supply store is a practical choice for bearings.
     
  4. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Anti sieze is most often recommended for threaded Ti stuff. Otherwise, plain grease works everywhere else,and is not near as nasty as antizieze when gotten where you don't want it.
     
  5. el Ingles

    el Ingles New Member

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    Have heard rumours about lithium grease causing corrosion ( the old cathode /anode thing , but I can remember the word in english , damn it ) so it might be better to use something else if you can when mixing metals / alloys .
    The local bike mechanic uses the stuff they use to grease elevator cables , and it seems to work ( remember it can get real hot here , the record is 47 C but that was in the 1,860´s ) even in the summer .
     
  6. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    Anti-seize compounds prevents seizing, galling, thread corrosion, and metal to metal seizure. I agree that anti-sieze componds can be "nasty" if you get them on you or your clothing. The metal particles in anti-sieze compounds are what gives them the added benefits... and the "nasty"side effect. Specific qualities of various anti-sieze compounds helps mitigate galvanic action as well as prevention of galling threads.
    If you want to use one coating in all applications, grease works.
    However, anti-sieze compounds have additional benefits.
    Titanium threads are notorius for galling, but stainless threads are prone to galling as well.
    I have used anti-sieze on telescoping aluminum interfaces like seat posts, quill stems, and antenna joints in long term applications in varying weather and environmental conditions. I have never experienced difficulties in these applications with anti-sieze, but I have had some difficulties with grease.
     
  7. Greg-O

    Greg-O New Member

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    well, i was just going to put the anti-seize on my BB threads when installing it, but if I have it sitting around I should put it on my seatpost too?

    this appears to be a very touchy subject with many opinions. hmmmm... post more :)
     
  8. Hecubus

    Hecubus New Member

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    There are obviously many options to choose from, anti-seize, grease, etc. If you just want to make your life simple there are plenty of bike specific multi purpose greases out there that will work quite well for everything. Pedro's Syn grease, Motorex, etc. Just go to a local bike shop and see what they carry.
    What everyone seems to agree on is that lithium grease is not a good idea. Apparently it can damage seals, finishes and cause a few other problems.
     
  9. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    Anti-sieze compounds are formulated for specific materials involved; like aluminum to aluminum, etc. If you have anti-sieze formulated for your seatpost and frame materials, I suggest you use it.
    As OP said, anti-sieze compunds are "nasty", so make sure to remove any residue that is exposed, after you have completed installation and adjustments.
    I don't mean to be touchy; just want to suggest proven methods.
    I have come down a coating type for each application.
    1. Grease for bearings,
    2. Anti-sieze compounds for threads and telescoping interfaces
    3. Loc-tite for water bottle holder, fender, and rack attachment fasteners.
    No interface goes together without a complete coating.
    Use sufficient to achieve a complete coating, but wipe off excess.
     
  10. Greg-O

    Greg-O New Member

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    well, my bike store has impressed me.
    They had a nice big tub of Park Tools PolyLube for only 15 bucks. I've heard awesome things about it. I'll tell you how it holds up.
     
  11. OHsingltrakr

    OHsingltrakr New Member

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    The park tools poly lube is a good grease, I've used it about two years. I buy the tube which is handy to apply with. My only complaint is that it seems to absorb water more readily than other greases I've used. For instance it washes out of my pivot bushings from stream and puddle crossing and headsets from getting rained on while riding. I just regrease headset frequently but in my pivots and shock bushings I now use synthetic brake caliper grease from auto store. It's extremely resistant to water and dirt, but would probably be too thick in a bearing like a hub or pedal. It's about $8 a tub with brush to apply and will last a long time. It makes a good substitute for anti-seize also, easier to clean up, stays in place and stops squeaks. Good luck with your purchase.
     
  12. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    I would agree with the "washes out" portion of your posting.
    Thicker greases like you describe are more resistant to washing out. Thick grease can be a good choice in the pivot and shock bushing application. Why don't you try it in you headset as well?
    I don't agree with your suggestions on resistance to dirt or substitute for anti-sieze compounds.
     
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