greasing wheel hubs?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Geoff Pearson, Feb 18, 2005.

  1. I think - after 5 years of daily commuting - that I need to replace the ball
    bearings in my hubs. They make a nice clickety-clack noise when I am sure
    they should be silent. I've held off because I remember what a faff it was
    greasing the bearings in pedals - getting the locknut done up just the right
    tightness. I do most other things on the bike and quite like dismantling,
    greasing and re-assembling. It is a 1999 Specialized A1 Comp with 8-speed
    cassette.

    Is replacing the balls and greasing up as bad as I thought? I presume I
    need thin spanners? Or should I just grow up and try - handing it over to
    the LBS if I make balls-up? I'll print the Sheldon Brown advice and work
    from that..
     
    Tags:


  2. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Geoff Pearson wrote:
    > I think - after 5 years of daily commuting - that I need to replace
    > the ball bearings in my hubs. They make a nice clickety-clack noise
    > when I am sure they should be silent. I've held off because I
    > remember what a faff it was greasing the bearings in pedals - getting
    > the locknut done up just the right tightness. I do most other things
    > on the bike and quite like dismantling, greasing and re-assembling.
    > It is a 1999 Specialized A1 Comp with 8-speed cassette.
    >
    > Is replacing the balls and greasing up as bad as I thought?


    It's not bad at all except final adjustment is tricky until you've had
    lots of experience at it. Particularly bear in mind the side effect that
    the quick release has.

    But Sheldon Brown's tips on "cone adjustment" help a lot. Instructions on
    Park Tools might help for the stages before that but their adjustment
    advice is not so good: they miss the trick about using two cone or locknut
    spanners at the same time.

    > presume I need thin spanners?


    Get a pair of cone spanners from LBS or www.mwdyason.ltd.uk/shop.asp ,
    plus a pair of ordinary spanners for the locknuts.

    Defnitely have a go!

    ~PB
     
  3. "Pete Biggs" <pwrinkledgrape{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Geoff Pearson wrote:
    >> I think - after 5 years of daily commuting - that I need to replace
    >> the ball bearings in my hubs. They make a nice clickety-clack noise
    >> when I am sure they should be silent. I've held off because I
    >> remember what a faff it was greasing the bearings in pedals - getting
    >> the locknut done up just the right tightness. I do most other things
    >> on the bike and quite like dismantling, greasing and re-assembling.
    >> It is a 1999 Specialized A1 Comp with 8-speed cassette.
    >>
    >> Is replacing the balls and greasing up as bad as I thought?

    >
    > It's not bad at all except final adjustment is tricky until you've had
    > lots of experience at it. Particularly bear in mind the side effect that
    > the quick release has.
    >
    > But Sheldon Brown's tips on "cone adjustment" help a lot. Instructions on
    > Park Tools might help for the stages before that but their adjustment
    > advice is not so good: they miss the trick about using two cone or locknut
    > spanners at the same time.
    >
    >> presume I need thin spanners?

    >
    > Get a pair of cone spanners from LBS or www.mwdyason.ltd.uk/shop.asp ,
    > plus a pair of ordinary spanners for the locknuts.
    >
    > Defnitely have a go!
    >
    > ~PB
    >
    >


    I see that Dyason is much cheaper than my LBS, Edinburgh Bike Coop - half
    price in effect, even if I cycle over the Meadows to buy the stuff. Quite
    surprising. I'll get a set of spanners and have a go.
     
  4. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Geoff Pearson
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > I think - after 5 years of daily commuting - that I need to replace
    > the ball bearings in my hubs. They make a nice clickety-clack noise
    > when I am sure they should be silent. I've held off because I
    > remember what a faff it was greasing the bearings in pedals - getting
    > the locknut done up just the right tightness. I do most other things
    > on the bike and quite like dismantling, greasing and re-assembling.
    > It is a 1999 Specialized A1 Comp with 8-speed cassette.
    >
    > Is replacing the balls and greasing up as bad as I thought?


    No, it's an easy job. Remember to put a bowl under the hub when you lift
    the axle out, or you will lose balls on the floor. Pedros make a bowl
    with a strong magnet in the base which is ideal for this purpose, but
    any bowl will do. The bearings in a wheel hub are substantially larger
    than those in a pedal, so a lot less fiddly to deal with.

    However, if it's as bad as you say the cups and cones may be knackered,
    too. Remover, inspect, and if they aren't smooth replace (if you can
    get the right cups and cones for your hubs). Next time, service more
    regularly - annually is good.

    Some modern hubs use cartridge bearings of course. These usually are not
    servicable, you just replace the unit.

    > I presume I need thin spanners?


    Yes, cone spanners, which you will get from your LBS.

    > Or should I just grow up and try - handing it over to
    > the LBS if I make balls-up? I'll print the Sheldon Brown advice and
    > work from that..


    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    "This young man has not the faintest idea how socialists think and does
    not begin to understand the mentality of the party he has been elected
    to lead. He is quite simply a liberal"
    -- Ken Coates MEP (Lab) of Tony Blair
     
  5. Nigel Cliffe

    Nigel Cliffe Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:

    [ sensible advice snipped ]

    > However, if it's as bad as you say the cups and cones may be
    > knackered, too. Remover, inspect, and if they aren't smooth replace
    > (if you can get the right cups and cones for your hubs). Next time,
    > service more regularly - annually is good.


    When inspecting a cone, a smooth shiny uniform wear line on the cone, where
    the ball bearing run, is OK and quite normal.
    The problems occur if that line is pitted, then the cone is knackered.

    If the cones are not a common current size, one may be able to get cones
    which match if there is a friendly shop which can hunt to find one with the
    same shape. One can substitute different spacer washers if necessary between
    cone and locknut to get the correct over-locknut-width (I made my own
    spacers once).



    - Nigel

    --
    NC - Webmaster for http://www.2mm.org.uk/
    Replies to newsgroup postings to the newsgroup please.
     
  6. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > Remember to put a bowl under the hub when you
    > lift the axle out, or you will lose balls on the floor. Pedros make a
    > bowl with a strong magnet in the base which is ideal for this
    > purpose, but any bowl will do.


    "Mike Lackey writes:
    "> I remember reading long ago that one should not use a magnet to
    "> remove ball bearings from a front/rear hub "lest ye be sorry".

    "The balls become magnetized and will forever after collect metal
    debris that can be found in bearings, debris that is better left to
    settle in quiet corners of the bearing. The balls become garbage
    collectors and self destruct."
    - Jobst Brandt, rec.bicycles.tech

    ~PB
     
  7. Roarer

    Roarer Guest

    Geoff Pearson <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I think - after 5 years of daily commuting - that I need to replace the

    ball
    > bearings in my hubs. They make a nice clickety-clack noise when I am sure
    > they should be silent. I've held off because I remember what a faff it

    was
    > greasing the bearings in pedals - getting the locknut done up just the

    right
    > tightness. I do most other things on the bike and quite like dismantling,
    > greasing and re-assembling. It is a 1999 Specialized A1 Comp with 8-speed
    > cassette.
    >
    > Is replacing the balls and greasing up as bad as I thought? I presume I
    > need thin spanners? Or should I just grow up and try - handing it over to
    > the LBS if I make balls-up? I'll print the Sheldon Brown advice and work
    > from that..



    I know all about hubs
     
  8. Dave

    Dave Guest

    Geoff Pearson wrote:
    > "Pete Biggs" <pwrinkledgrape{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Geoff Pearson wrote:
    >>
    >>>I think - after 5 years of daily commuting - that I need to replace
    >>>the ball bearings in my hubs. They make a nice clickety-clack noise
    >>>when I am sure they should be silent. I've held off because I
    >>>remember what a faff it was greasing the bearings in pedals - getting
    >>>the locknut done up just the right tightness. I do most other things
    >>>on the bike and quite like dismantling, greasing and re-assembling.
    >>>It is a 1999 Specialized A1 Comp with 8-speed cassette.
    >>>
    >>>Is replacing the balls and greasing up as bad as I thought?

    >>
    >>It's not bad at all except final adjustment is tricky until you've had
    >>lots of experience at it. Particularly bear in mind the side effect that
    >>the quick release has.
    >>
    >>But Sheldon Brown's tips on "cone adjustment" help a lot. Instructions on
    >>Park Tools might help for the stages before that but their adjustment
    >>advice is not so good: they miss the trick about using two cone or locknut
    >>spanners at the same time.
    >>
    >>
    >>>presume I need thin spanners?

    >>
    >>Get a pair of cone spanners from LBS or www.mwdyason.ltd.uk/shop.asp ,
    >>plus a pair of ordinary spanners for the locknuts.
    >>
    >>Defnitely have a go!
    >>
    >>~PB
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > I see that Dyason is much cheaper than my LBS, Edinburgh Bike Coop - half
    > price in effect, even if I cycle over the Meadows to buy the stuff. Quite
    > surprising. I'll get a set of spanners and have a go.
    >
    >


    For those sort of hubs.. that is in which the balls are loose.. the
    right no of balls.. is one less than will physically fit. If you can
    fit 2 balls in the remaining space you have lost one. If you fit the
    extra ball truly nasty things will happen

    If the cones are that old.. and its making noise they will be stuffed.
    They dont have to be very stuffed to be stuffed.. If you are replacing
    cones then replace all the balls. They only cost cents.. er sorry pence.

    Its a piss easy job.. When I was racing track we would pull the hubs
    apart before every race and put em together with vasiline under the
    impression we would go faster.

    Dave
     
  9. Pete W

    Pete W Guest

    Geoff Pearson wrote:
    > I think - after 5 years of daily commuting - that I need to replace the ball
    > bearings in my hubs. They make a nice clickety-clack noise when I am sure
    > they should be silent. I've held off because I remember what a faff it was
    > greasing the bearings in pedals - getting the locknut done up just the right
    > tightness. I do most other things on the bike and quite like dismantling,
    > greasing and re-assembling. It is a 1999 Specialized A1 Comp with 8-speed
    > cassette.
    >
    > Is replacing the balls and greasing up as bad as I thought? I presume I
    > need thin spanners? Or should I just grow up and try - handing it over to
    > the LBS if I make balls-up? I'll print the Sheldon Brown advice and work
    > from that..


    if you drill a small (1.5mm) hole in the dust caps (some Shimano and
    Campag hubs come like this already), then, witha fine nozzle grease gun,
    squirt fresh grease into the hole, then the old stuff pushes out around
    the cones with any dirt being flushed out. If the bearings are adjusted
    good when you do this, then they will stay good for years without having
    to adjust them. Just do the grease twice a year. For rear Shimano MTB
    hubs, then lift the rubber seal off the LH side. Can't do too much on
    the cassette side though
     
  10. Al C-F

    Al C-F Guest

    On Fri, 18 Feb 2005 17:32:27 +0000, Simon Brooke
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >However, if it's as bad as you say the cups and cones may be knackered,
    >too. Remover, inspect, and if they aren't smooth replace (if you can
    >get the right cups and cones for your hubs).


    Learning all the while...

    ....you can repalce the cups? Is this on all hubs or only those of a
    reputable make. (I am using wheels with Shimano 'parallax' hubs).
     
  11. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Al C-F wrote:
    > ...you can repalce the cups? Is this on all hubs or only those of a
    > reputable make.


    If hub cups are replaceable at all, they tend to be pressed in so firmly
    that's it's a professional job to remove and fit.

    Cones wear out first anyway so you'll be ok if you catch the wear early
    enough, or of course prevent it in the first place.

    > (I am using wheels with Shimano 'parallax' hubs).


    Sorry I don't know about the cups in those.

    ~PB
     
  12. Al C-F

    Al C-F Guest

    On Sat, 19 Feb 2005 13:19:12 -0000, "Pete Biggs"
    <pwrinkledgrape{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    >Al C-F wrote:
    >> ...you can repalce the cups? Is this on all hubs or only those of a
    >> reputable make.

    >
    >If hub cups are replaceable at all, they tend to be pressed in so firmly
    >that's it's a professional job to remove and fit.


    I shan't be doing that then.
    >
    >Cones wear out first anyway so you'll be ok if you catch the wear early
    >enough, or of course prevent it in the first place.
    >
    >> (I am using wheels with Shimano 'parallax' hubs).

    >
    >Sorry I don't know about the cups in those.


    Very much low-end, I think. Came on a bike fitted with an Altus
    chainset. Probably not user-servicable.

    Thanks.
     
  13. m-gineering

    m-gineering Guest

    Al C-F wrote:
    >


    > >
    > >Cones wear out first anyway so you'll be ok if you catch the wear early
    > >enough, or of course prevent it in the first place.
    > >
    > >> (I am using wheels with Shimano 'parallax' hubs).

    > >
    > >Sorry I don't know about the cups in those.

    >
    > Very much low-end, I think. Came on a bike fitted with an Altus
    > chainset. Probably not user-servicable.
    >
    > Thanks.



    cones and axles should be freely available, but Shimano doesn't offer
    replacement cups. You can service these hubs just like any other
    Shimano offering
    --
    ---
    Marten Gerritsen

    INFOapestaartjeM-GINEERINGpuntNL
    www.m-gineering.nl
     
  14. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Sort of depends. Officially you can't, and cups aren't available as spares. But I've done it on an old MTB hub. Removing the cup by engaging the edge from the other side of the hub and tapping it gently with a chisel took maybe a total of 2 minutes. That time I replaced it with a sealed bearing instead. Since then I've retrieved the cups from a hub that got scrapped for other reasons and I reckon I'll be able to use them as spares if needed.
     
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