Great Victorian Bike Ride

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by nashy_88, Aug 29, 2004.

  1. nashy_88

    nashy_88 New Member

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    Anyone out there experienced this annual event? I haven't but am contimplating entering ino the even after my end of year exams. Can anyone give me any details and/or experiences of the event either good or bad?

    Cheers
     
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  2. takver

    takver New Member

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    I did it with the partner several years ago. My advice is do it at least once for the experience. And it is an experience. A full range of cyclists are represented. Bicycle Victoria have the logistics down pat, but things can still go wrong when your moving and feeding the equivalent of a small town on wheels everyday. Expect queueing for dinner, showers, washing up, etc

    Most people seem to have a good time. Enjoy yourself!
     
  3. Jack Russell

    Jack Russell Guest

    takver wrote:
    > nashy_88 Wrote:
    >
    >>Anyone out there experienced this annual event? I haven't but am
    >>contimplating entering ino the even after my end of year exams. Can
    >>anyone give me any details and/or experiences of the event either good
    >>or bad?
    >>
    >>Cheers

    >
    >
    > I did it with the partner several years ago. My advice is do it at
    > least once for the experience. And it is an experience. A full range of
    > cyclists are represented. Bicycle Victoria have the logistics down pat,
    > but things can still go wrong when your moving and feeding the
    > equivalent of a small town on wheels everyday. Expect queueing for
    > dinner, showers, washing up, etc
    >
    > Most people seem to have a good time. Enjoy yourself!
    >
    >

    Try the NSW ride, less people better organised (in my opinion)
     
  4. ProfTournesol

    ProfTournesol New Member

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    It's the Great Ocean Road this year - good route. You've missed out on the free bike that came with this year's entry though.
     
  5. mfhor

    mfhor New Member

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    Not missing much, It's a BESS (bottom end supermarket special) known to unkind people as a shitter.

    Down Pat? Who's he when he's at home? It's a rolling catastrophe - but a functional one. Expect to learn to like quiche.

    M "but at least it gets people into touring" H
     
  6. ProfTournesol

    ProfTournesol New Member

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    good chance for a 'free' shitty town bike for commuting, riding over tramlines etc:)
    I'm taking my 10 year old - her first experience of a long multi-day ride.
     
  7. mfhor

    mfhor New Member

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    I'm very admiring of anyone pre-teen who does 500kms in 9 days. I've seen a few do it (serial ride-support offender). Shows a fair deal of guts and determination. Where's the Olympics after Beijing? ;)

    Getting off a nice roadie, do you really want to push 18 kg of mild steel up hills ? :O

    M "he'll be after a MH commuter special next" H
     
  8. ProfTournesol

    ProfTournesol New Member

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    I'm taking my Look on the ride but the trash bike is for commuting, rail trails etc.
    The GVBR is good practice for the Pyrenees when she's 12:)
    I hope that the presence of thousands of others will somewhat mute the "this is boring" and "why are we doing this stupid ride" comments!
     
  9. mfhor wrote:
    ....snip...

    > Expect to learn to like quiche.


    You ARE kidding?
     
  10. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch New Member

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    'Real' men need not apply :D
     
  11. Paulus

    Paulus Guest

    "flyingdutch" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    >
    > Terry Collins Wrote:
    > > mfhor wrote:
    > > ....snip...
    > >
    > > > Expect to learn to like quiche.

    > >
    > > You ARE kidding?

    >
    >
    > 'Real' men need not apply :D
    >
    >
    > --
    > flyingdutch
    >


    I'm going on the GVBR for the 1st time since 1988. Not more quiche..I still
    have nightmares over all the frozen quiche I had to eat the last time I did
    the ride!
     
  12. Paulus wrote:

    > I'm going on the GVBR for the 1st time since 1988. Not more quiche..I still
    > have nightmares over all the frozen quiche I had to eat the last time I did
    > the ride!


    It is so easy; cooking for touring bicyclists 101
    1 pot, water, + meat, cook for one hour,
    add vegetables cook for 30 minutes,
    serve.

    Then CFTC 102 is add one of 1,000 variations of herbs and spices.
     
  13. ProfTournesol

    ProfTournesol New Member

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    mmmm......... a whole week of hamburgers and pizzas then:)
     
  14. ProfTournesol wrote:

    > mmmm......... a whole week of hamburgers and pizzas then:)


    When catering, hamburgers, snags, steak, i.e. fried or baked stuff
    really chews up the gas, but back to your topic.

    This I guess would count as a cultural trip, so long as you sample local
    fare only and no franchise crap. Hint, look for the trucker stops for
    best tucker and value (generally speaking, flotation device distractions
    excepted).
     
  15. mfhor

    mfhor New Member

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    This is why I think you get gypped on large events - the food is basic and nutritious, but the catering logistics sometimes make taste an optional extra. OK, so if you are going to sample the local fare, what have you paid $600-odd for? Luggage transport? Budget hygeine facilities?

    Why not just take off with a few mates, carry your own gear, stay in B+Bs/on-site vans/country pubs/your own tent, never have to queue for a shower, or even ride if the weather looks iffy, and change your plans if you want to/need to/have to? It works out to about the same price, or a little more.

    Freedom from crowds, and to the locals, you're not just a member of a travelling circus act.

    M "touring is for life, not just for Christmas" H
     
  16. mfhor wrote:

    > This is why I think you get gypped on large events - the food is basic
    > and nutritious, but the catering logistics sometimes make taste an
    > optional extra.


    They shouldn't. Anyone with any decent cooking skills should be able to
    organise a menu with some variety.

    OK, so if you are going to sample the local fare, what
    > have you paid $600-odd for? Luggage transport? Budget hygeine
    > facilities?
    >
    > Why not just take off with a few mates, carry your own gear, stay in
    > B+Bs/on-site vans/country pubs/your own tent, never have to queue for a
    > shower, or even ride if the weather looks iffy, and change your plans if
    > you want to/need to/have to? It works out to about the same price, or a
    > little more.


    The biggest costs is the vehicle. You should really pay the full cost of
    the vehicle, not just share petrol. After food (which it helps if you
    have some agreement), the next largest is accommodation.

    It certyainly is a good way. biggest trouble is getting the time of work
    together each time.
     
  17. ProfTournesol

    ProfTournesol New Member

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    having done lots of that kind of touring, I may agree with you after my (first) experience of this kind, but 8 days of non-stop wingeing from a 10 year old (who could never lower her dignity long enough to admit that she was actually enjoying herself) makes the opportunity to share the burden a compelling one. I'll pass on the food I think.
     
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