Green Tea Rejuvenates Skin

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Ian Goddard, Nov 1, 2003.

  1. Ian Goddard

    Ian Goddard Guest

    Medical College of Georgia http://www.mcg.edu/news/2003NewsRel/hsu.html

    Green Tea Linked to Skin Cell Rejuvenation

    Christine Hurley Deriso

    Research into the health-promoting properties of green tea is yielding information that may lead to
    new treatments for skin diseases and wounds.

    Dr. Stephen Hsu, a cell biologist in the Medical College of Georgia Department of Oral Biology, has
    uncovered a wealth of information about green tea in the last few years. Most importantly, he
    helped determine that compounds in green tea called polyphenols help eliminate free radicals,
    which can cause cancer by altering DNA. He also found that polyphenols safeguard healthy cells
    while ushering cancer cells to their death.

    He recently began studying the most abundant green tea polyphenol, EGCG. Using pooled human
    keratinocytes (skin cells), he and his colleagues studied the normal growth of the skin cells and
    compared it to the growth of the cells when exposed to EGCG.

    To their astonishment, they found that EGCG reactivated dying skin cells. "Cells that migrate toward
    the surface of the skin normally live about 28 days, and by day 20, they basically sit on the upper
    layer of the skin getting ready to die," Dr. Hsu said. "But EGCG reactivates them. I was so
    surprised."

    The skin consists of three layers: the epidermis (outer layer), dermis (mid-layer) and hypodermis
    (inner layer). Dr. Hsu learned that green tea polyphenols aren’t absorbed beyond the epidermis, so
    any benefits are limited to that outer layer of skin. But the benefits, he stressed, seem
    significant.

    Cells in the epidermis, or keratinocytes, are in a constant state of renewal. The newly formed
    cells, stem cells, are undifferentiated but rapidly dividing. As they push through the epidermis,
    they begin differentiating. During this migration and differentiation process, the cells are very
    active, expending and consuming vast amounts of energy.

    Once they reach the surface of the skin, their metabolic activity slows dramatically and they
    prepare to die, while forming a water-proof, sheet-like structure. As they die off about a month
    into their life cycle, they are replaced by another wave of migrating cells supplied by stem cells,
    starting the process all over again.

    But EGCG seems to be a fountain of youth for skin cells. "When exposed to EGCG, the old cells found
    in the upper layers of the epidermis appear to start dividing again," Dr. Hsu said. "They make DNA
    and produce more energy. They are reactivated. There are lots of unknowns--this is the first step
    into the door--but if we can energize dying skin cells, we can probably improve the skin condition."

    In addition, the researchers found that EGCG accelerates the differentiation process among
    new cells.

    Combining these effects of EGCG on skin cells in different layers of the epidermis, Dr. Hsu noted
    potential benefits for skin conditions as diverse as aphthous ulcers, psoriasis, rosascea, wrinkles
    and wounds. "If skin cells surrounding wounds or infections don’t heal in time, fibroblasts in the
    connective tissue may rush in to fill the void and cause scar tissue formation," he said. "If we can
    spur the skin cells to differentiate and proliferate, we can potentially accelerate the
    wound-healing process and prevent scarring."

    This potential benefit is particularly exciting for conditions such as diabetes, which stubbornly
    inhibits the wound-healing process, Dr. Hsu said.

    He and his colleagues hope to identify dermatologists interested in collaborating on clinical
    studies of EGCG and other polyphenols on patients.

    Ds. Hsu’s research, which is excerpted on the online version of the Journal of Pharmacology and
    Experimental Therapeutics, is funded by the Dental Research Foundation, the MCG School of
    Dentistry and MCG Research Institute.

    http://IanGoddard.net/journal.htm

    "To lengthen thy life, lessen thy meals." Ben Franklin

    Ongoing CR monkey study update: "In the monkeys...those on reduced feeding since the study started
    are dying at a rate that is about half that of the monkeys receiving a full food ration."
    Associated Press: Eating less may extend human life. August 1, 2002 :
    http://www.msnbc.com/news/788746.asp?0si=-
     
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  2. Ian Goddard

    Ian Goddard Guest

    >http://www.mcg.edu/news/2003NewsRel/hsu.html Green Tea Linked to Skin Cell Rejuvenation

    The abstract...

    J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2003 Mar 27; [epub ahead of print]

    Green Tea Polyphenols Induce Differentiation and Proliferation in Epidermal Keratinocytes.

    Hsu SD, Bollag WB, Lewis J, Huang Q, Singh B, Sharawy M, Yamamoto T, Schuster G.

    Medical College of Georgia.

    The most abundant green tea polyphenol, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), was found to induce
    differential effects between tumor cells and normal cells. Nevertheless, how normal epithelial cells
    respond to the polyphenol at concentrations for which tumor cells undergo apoptosis is undefined.
    The current study tested exponentially growing and aged primary human epidermal keratinocytes in
    response to EGCG or a mixture of the four major green tea polyphenols. EGCG elicited cell
    differentiation with associated induction of p57/KIP2 within 24 hours in growing keratinocytes,
    measured by the expression of keratin 1, filaggrin and transglutaminase activity. Aged
    keratinocytes, which exhibited low basal cellular activities after culturing in growth medium for up
    to 25 days, renewed DNA synthesis and activated succinate dehydrogenase up to 37-fold upon exposure
    to either EGCG or the polyphenols. These results suggest that tea polyphenols may be used for
    treatment of wounds or certain skin conditions characterized by altered cellular activities or
    metabolism.

    PMID: 12663686 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12663686&dop-
    t=Abstract

    http://IanGoddard.net/journal.htm

    "To lengthen thy life, lessen thy meals." Ben Franklin

    Ongoing CR monkey study update: "In the monkeys...those on reduced feeding since the study started
    are dying at a rate that is about half that of the monkeys receiving a full food ration."
    Associated Press: Eating less may extend human life. August 1, 2002 :
    http://www.msnbc.com/news/788746.asp?0si=-
     
  3. Now that my concern regarding fluoride levels in green tea has caused me to limit my consumption
    considerably, I'm sure new studies like this one showing more and more health benefits will come
    fast and furious...

    "Ian Goddard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Medical College of Georgia http://www.mcg.edu/news/2003NewsRel/hsu.html
    >
    > Green Tea Linked to Skin Cell Rejuvenation
    >

    <snip
     
  4. Ian Goddard

    Ian Goddard Guest

    Re: http://www.mcg.edu/news/2003NewsRel/hsu.html

    On Mon, 26 May 2003, "Nelson J. Navarro" wrote:

    >Now that my concern regarding fluoride levels in green tea has caused me to limit my consumption
    >considerably, I'm sure new studies like this one showing more and more health benefits will come
    >fast and furious...

    IAN: Yeah, that and the high levels of aluminum in green tea have concerned me too. However, I've
    not cut my intake of green-tea-extract pills because there's no correlation between tea and
    Alzheimer's disease, which might serve as an indicator of toxic aluminum exposure:

    http://www.google.com/groups?selm=haccavcea5dsu7667ft0n07e9v1p819klo%404ax.com
    http://www.google.com/groups?selm=gq8havshkhetd6s78ctbgvc8iev0gtma1n%404ax.com

    Also, fluoride levels in extract might be lower than leaf:
    http://www.google.com/groups?selm=9o4cavkpkhjgpd310b2vvmsn4j74c4jof9%404ax.com

    I'm also not aware of evidence of fluorosis linked to tea consumption (except Tibetan "brick
    tea"). Although there's evidence of a correlation between improved bone density and tea drinking,
    which might be attributed to fluoride content:

    Arch Intern Med 2002 May 13;162(9):1001-6: "CONCLUSION: Habitual tea consumption, especially for
    more than 10 years, has significant beneficial effects on BMD of the total body, lumbar spine, and
    hip regions in adults."

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11996609&dop-
    t=Abstract

    That said, it still concerns me that I may be building up aluminum and fluoride from green tea and
    wish that we might causes providers to inform us about Al and fluoride content.

    http://IanGoddard.net

    "'Tis very certain the desire of life Prolongs it." Lord Byron (Don Juan, 2.64)

    Ongoing CR monkey study update: "In the monkeys...those on reduced feeding since the study started
    are dying at a rate that is about half that of the monkeys receiving a full food ration."
    Associated Press: Eating less may extend human life. August 1, 2002 :
    http://www.msnbc.com/news/788746.asp?0si=-
     
  5. Chuck

    Chuck Guest

    "Nelson J. Navarro" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Now that my concern regarding fluoride levels in green tea has caused me to limit my consumption
    > considerably, I'm sure new studies like this one showing more and more health benefits will come
    > fast and furious...

    I'm pretty sure that it has to be applied topically to get the benefits mentioned for skin.
     
  6. I'm hoping that taking calcium and magnesium supplements will provide protection from aluminum and
    fluoride (there seems to be some evidence for this).

    Regards, Nelson

    "Ian Goddard" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Re: http://www.mcg.edu/news/2003NewsRel/hsu.html
    >
    > On Mon, 26 May 2003, "Nelson J. Navarro" wrote:
    >
    > >Now that my concern regarding fluoride levels in green tea has caused me
    to
    > >limit my consumption considerably, I'm sure new studies like this one showing more and more
    > >health benefits will come fast and furious...
    >
    > IAN: Yeah, that and the high levels of aluminum in green tea have concerned me too. However,
    > I've not cut my intake of green-tea-extract pills because there's no correlation between tea and
    > Alzheimer's disease, which might serve as an indicator of toxic aluminum exposure:

    <snip
     
  7. Peter Meiers

    Peter Meiers Guest

    Ian Goddard wrote:

    > Arch Intern Med 2002 May 13;162(9):1001-6: "CONCLUSION: Habitual tea consumption, especially for
    > more than 10 years, has significant beneficial effects on BMD of the total body, lumbar spine,
    > and hip regions in adults."

    Is this an example for what they call "Jumping to conclusions"?

    --
    -History of fluorine, fluoride and fluoridation-: --- http://PMeiers.bei.t-online.de/index.htm ---
    -------------------------------------------------
     
  8. Anon

    Anon Guest

    > Also, fluoride levels in extract might be lower than leaf:
    > http://www.google.com/groups?selm=9o4cavkpkhjgpd310b2vvmsn4j74c4jof9%404ax .com
    >
    > I'm also not aware of evidence of fluorosis linked to tea consumption (except Tibetan "brick
    > tea"). Although there's evidence of a correlation between improved bone density and tea
    > drinking, which might be attributed to fluoride content:
    >
    > Arch Intern Med 2002 May 13;162(9):1001-6: "CONCLUSION: Habitual tea consumption, especially for
    > more than 10 years, has significant beneficial effects on BMD of the total body, lumbar spine,
    > and hip regions in adults."

    Then again it might have to do with the catechins being phytoestrogens. Take a look at raloxofene's
    (sp?) benefits.

    > http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_
    > uids=11996609&dopt=Abstract
    >
    > That said, it still concerns me that I may be building up aluminum and fluoride from green tea
    > and wish that we might causes providers to inform us about Al and fluoride content.

    Doesn't green tea chelate metals and transport them out? I know adding a calcium source like milk
    negates its health benefits.
     
  9. Arto Raiskio

    Arto Raiskio Guest

    "Nelson J. Navarro" wrote
    > protection from aluminum and fluoride (there seems to be some evidence for

    wonder if selenium would also work as it apparently is quite effective for mercury (will look for
    the references I was reading earlier today)
     
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