Grilled Swiss Chard Stems

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Goomba38, Mar 25, 2005.

  1. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    On Tyler Florences recent "How to Boil Water"
    show, he made wilted swiss chard. He removed the
    stems and mentioned that Italians grill these with
    olive oil. I've never had them so, has anyone?
    I am making Chick Pea and Escarole Soup, except I
    couldn't find escarole so I'm substituting swiss
    chard.
    Goomba
     
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  2. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Goomba38 wrote:
    > On Tyler Florences recent "How to Boil Water"
    > show, he made wilted swiss chard. He removed the
    > stems and mentioned that Italians grill these with
    > olive oil. I've never had them so, has anyone?
    > I am making Chick Pea and Escarole Soup, except I
    > couldn't find escarole so I'm substituting swiss
    > chard.
    > Goomba


    Yes, the stem and rib section of "greens" are like a separate
    vegetable... I grill collard stems all the time. You can also dice the
    stems and add to your soup. Btw, there are some certain people who may
    not be happy to learn that chard is beets.

    Sheldon
     
  3. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    Sheldon wrote:

    Btw, there are some certain people who may
    > not be happy to learn that chard is beets.
    >
    > Sheldon
    >


    LOL... you're so bad :)
    I looked at those sturdy stalks and thought if I
    grilled them, then dressed them in an oil/vinegar
    marinade they might make a nice little addition to
    an antipasto platter. Whatcha think?
    Goomba
     
  4. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Goomba38 wrote:
    > Sheldon wrote:
    >
    > Btw, there are some certain people who may
    > > not be happy to learn that chard is beets.
    > >
    > > Sheldon
    > >

    >
    > LOL... you're so bad :)
    > I looked at those sturdy stalks and thought if I
    > grilled them, then dressed them in an oil/vinegar
    > marinade they might make a nice little addition to
    > an antipasto platter. Whatcha think?
    > Goomba


    Yes, they're good as a hot vegetable or cold in a salad.
     
  5. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Goomba38 wrote:

    > On Tyler Florences recent "How to Boil Water"
    > show, he made wilted swiss chard. He removed the
    > stems and mentioned that Italians grill these with
    > olive oil. I've never had them so, has anyone?
    > I am making Chick Pea and Escarole Soup, except I
    > couldn't find escarole so I'm substituting swiss
    > chard.


    I never had Swiss Chard until a few months ago.
    The list of vegetables that I really hate is not very long,
    but Swiss Chard was added to it.
     
  6. There's a Swiss Chard Au Gratin on Epicurious and it's too die for!
    However, it's very labor intensive....
     
  7. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Goomba wrote:

    > On Tyler Florences recent "How to Boil Water" show, he made wilted swiss
    > chard. He removed the stems and mentioned that Italians grill these with
    > olive oil. I've never had them so, has anyone?


    I've cooked beet stalks before; I think they're pretty much the same as
    chard stalks. I just steamed them and added black pepper and butter. For a
    more elaborate treatment, you might try this recipe which I happened to see
    on TV:

    www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_16698,00.html:

    Beet Stalks with Prosciutto: Coste di Bietola con Prosciutto
    Show: Molto Mario
    Episode: Presnitz Is Love

    Recipe Summary
    Difficulty: Medium
    Prep Time: 20 minutes
    Cook Time: 30 minutes
    Yield: 4 servings

    2 bunches beet greens, beets reserved for another use
    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus 1 tablespoon
    2 ounces prosciutto di San Daniele, thinly sliced, then julienned
    2 oranges zested, plus 1 orange juiced
    Pinch cinnamon
    1/2 red onion, sliced paper thin

    Clean the beet greens, removing the leaves and setting them aside for
    another use. Trim the stalks on the cut end to 6 inches long.

    Bring 1 quart of water to a boil and set up an ice bath nearby. Cook the
    stalks for 2 to 3 minutes in the boiling water until tender, then shock in
    ice water. Once cooled, remove the stalks and pat dry. Cut the stalks into
    1/4-inch julienne and set aside.

    In a 12 to 14-inch saute pan, heat the 2 tablespoons olive oil over high
    heat until almost smoking. Add the beet stalks, prosciutto, orange zest,
    cinnamon, remaining olive oil and red onion and toss to coat, about 30
    seconds. Splash with the orange juice and toss again. Season with salt and
    pepper and divide among 4 plates. Serve immediately, with fish or grilled
    meats.


    Bob
     
  8. kalanamak

    kalanamak Guest

    Goomba38 wrote:
    > On Tyler Florences recent "How to Boil Water" show, he made wilted swiss
    > chard. He removed the stems and mentioned that Italians grill these with
    > olive oil. I've never had them so, has anyone?
    > I am making Chick Pea and Escarole Soup, except I couldn't find escarole
    > so I'm substituting swiss chard.
    > Goomba
    >

    I think them delicious grilled, and brush lightly with my standard olive
    oil, lemon juice, minced lemon thyme mix.
    blacksalt
     
  9. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Goomba38 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Tyler Florences recent "How to Boil Water"
    > show, he made wilted swiss chard. He removed the
    > stems and mentioned that Italians grill these with
    > olive oil. I've never had them so, has anyone?
    > I am making Chick Pea and Escarole Soup, except I
    > couldn't find escarole so I'm substituting swiss
    > chard.
    > Goomba
    >


    Mmmmmm... Chard is not bitter like Escarole. :)
    It's slightly tart and sweet. I just planted more out in the garden
    so I'll have some all year if all goes well!
    Slightly "meaty" flavor, similar to but better
    than fresh spinach and easier to wash clean!

    I've not tried grilling the stems, but I often use
    chard in stir fry. I sautee' the stems sliced into
    bite sized pieces and rip the leaves the same way.

    It's fabulous no matter how you cook it IMHO. I often
    just steam it and serve with a bit of lemon butter.

    But, Chard IS my #1 favorite green! I have red, green
    and rainbow chard (yellow and orange stems).

    Not tried it in soup. but that's a good idea, thanks!

    --
    K.

    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  10. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Goomba38 wrote:
    > > On Tyler Florences recent "How to Boil Water"
    > > show, he made wilted swiss chard. He removed the
    > > stems and mentioned that Italians grill these with
    > > olive oil. I've never had them so, has anyone?
    > > I am making Chick Pea and Escarole Soup, except I
    > > couldn't find escarole so I'm substituting swiss
    > > chard.
    > > Goomba

    >
    > Yes, the stem and rib section of "greens" are like a separate
    > vegetable... I grill collard stems all the time. You can also dice the
    > stems and add to your soup. Btw, there are some certain people who may
    > not be happy to learn that chard is beets.
    >
    > Sheldon
    >


    Wow, really??? Same family? The roots don't form large bulbs
    like beets do!

    Funny, I adore beet greens but not beets, and have always
    compared them to chard.

    Thanks! :)


    BTW, I _hate_ callard greens!!! Blech.
    Mustard is not much better!

    My chickens love it tho'.
    Makes their eggyolks nice and orange!

    --
    K.

    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  11. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Goomba38 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Sheldon wrote:
    >
    > Btw, there are some certain people who may
    > > not be happy to learn that chard is beets.
    > >
    > > Sheldon
    > >

    >
    > LOL... you're so bad :)
    > I looked at those sturdy stalks and thought if I
    > grilled them, then dressed them in an oil/vinegar
    > marinade they might make a nice little addition to
    > an antipasto platter. Whatcha think?
    > Goomba
    >


    Chard is not bad raw on a "dip" tray.
    --
    K.
     
  12. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Goomba38 wrote:
    >
    > > On Tyler Florences recent "How to Boil Water"
    > > show, he made wilted swiss chard. He removed the
    > > stems and mentioned that Italians grill these with
    > > olive oil. I've never had them so, has anyone?
    > > I am making Chick Pea and Escarole Soup, except I
    > > couldn't find escarole so I'm substituting swiss
    > > chard.

    >
    > I never had Swiss Chard until a few months ago.
    > The list of vegetables that I really hate is not very long,
    > but Swiss Chard was added to it.
    >
    >
    >


    How sad... :-(

    How was it prepared?

    Do you like fresh spinach?
    Chard is similar in flavor and texture
    if prepared properly, but it's slightly
    more tart.

    --
    K.

    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    There is no need to change the world. All we have to do is toilet train the world and we'll never have to change it again. -- Swami Beyondanada

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
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