Grinding Meat For Hamburgers

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by alan[remove][email protected], Sep 3, 2005.

  1. I never ground meat for hamburgers. I have a Kitchen aid mixer with
    the grinder and pasta extruder attachment. I think I can figure out
    how to use it, I have made pasta with it, but what I don't know
    anything about is what to buy.

    The last two times we had BBQs, we used ground sirloin from this local
    place that had it on sale for $2.89 and $2.69 a pound. Boneless
    sirloin on sale is usually about $3.99 and Fairway has prime sirloin
    for london broil at $4.99.

    So, how do they get down to $2.89 and $2.69. What do they add to it
    to bring down the price? This ground sirloin was 92% lean. Could
    that be from a peice of sirloin for london broil. What am I missing
    here?

    I really like the taste of sirlon, so is there anything I should add
    to a piece of sirlon london broil to get the fat content down up to
    10% or 90% lean.

    What is the difference between sirloin and top sirloin? Is prime
    sirloin better than choice top sirloin? What are the differences?

    Alan
     
    Tags:


  2. ""alan[rem????????????" <"alan[rem???????????? wrote in message
    > The last two times we had BBQs, we used ground sirloin from this local
    > place that had it on sale for $2.89 and $2.69 a pound. Boneless
    > sirloin on sale is usually about $3.99 and Fairway has prime sirloin
    > for london broil at $4.99.


    I've never seen prime at Fairway, mostly select. I don't buy beef there for
    that reason. I get choice at BJ's If they have prime, I'd grab it, but not
    for grinding.


    >
    > So, how do they get down to $2.89 and $2.69. What do they add to it
    > to bring down the price?


    Trimmings. Tiny pieces you'd not want to cook as is.


    >
    > I really like the taste of sirlon, so is there anything I should add
    > to a piece of sirlon london broil to get the fat content down up to
    > 10% or 90% lean.


    IMO, 90% lean is way to lean for a juicy burger. I like 80 to 80%. Just add
    fat.

    >
    > What is the difference between sirloin and top sirloin? Is prime
    > sirloin better than choice top sirloin? What are the differences?


    I'm not sure aside from the placement in the steer. Placement equates to
    tenderness though.
     
  3. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Edwin Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > ""alan[rem????????????" <"alan[rem???????????? wrote in message
    >> The last two times we had BBQs, we used ground sirloin from this local
    >> place that had it on sale for $2.89 and $2.69 a pound. Boneless
    >> sirloin on sale is usually about $3.99 and Fairway has prime sirloin
    >> for london broil at $4.99.

    >
    > I've never seen prime at Fairway, mostly select. I don't buy beef there
    > for that reason. I get choice at BJ's If they have prime, I'd grab it,
    > but not for grinding.
    >
    >
    >>
    >> So, how do they get down to $2.89 and $2.69. What do they add to it
    >> to bring down the price?

    >
    > Trimmings. Tiny pieces you'd not want to cook as is.
    >
    >
    >>
    >> I really like the taste of sirlon, so is there anything I should add
    >> to a piece of sirlon london broil to get the fat content down up to
    >> 10% or 90% lean.

    >
    > IMO, 90% lean is way to lean for a juicy burger. I like 80 to 80%. Just
    > add fat.
    >
    >>
    >> What is the difference between sirloin and top sirloin? Is prime
    >> sirloin better than choice top sirloin? What are the differences?

    >
    > I'm not sure aside from the placement in the steer. Placement equates to
    > tenderness though.
    >
    >


    That's right, but it's irrelevant for hamburger.


    --
    Peter Aitken
     
  4. ...

    ... Guest

    alan wrote:
    > I never ground meat for hamburgers. I have a Kitchen aid mixer with
    > the grinder and pasta extruder attachment. I think I can figure out
    > how to use it, I have made pasta with it, but what I don't know
    > anything about is what to buy.

    Alan, I'm sure Sheldon won't mind me sharing his advice to me when I
    first became GrinderGirl:
    Hi,
    I don't mind helping people. When just starting out with meat grinding
    it's best to begin on a small scale until you familiarize yourself.
    You will quickly feel comfortable and will expand on your own....

    The one main thing to keep in mind is that grinding meat is not a way
    to save money... do not get caught up in thinking to look for the
    cheapest cuts, instead look for the best cuts you can afford... there
    is no reason not to grind expensive steaks to make burgers, they'll be
    the best burgers you have had, and in fact will be better than the
    steaks had you not ground them and you'll come to prefer your steaks
    ground.

    But the most important thing is to follow the rules of food safety,
    work clean, quick, and cold... everything that comes into contact with
    the meat should be refrigerated, all bowls, the cutting board, and most
    importantly the grinder itself. If you live in a warm climate do your
    grinding during the early morning before the heat of the day.

    One of the easiest beef cuts to start out with is top round, it's
    readily available, reasonably priced, and makes excellent burgers and
    meat loaf.

    You can expand to grind all kinds of meats, including pork, chicken,
    fish, most anything.

    The thing is to just dive in.

    Enjoy.

    Sheldon
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>,
    alan[remove][email protected] wrote:

    > I never ground meat for hamburgers. I have a Kitchen aid mixer with
    > the grinder and pasta extruder attachment. I think I can figure out
    > how to use it, I have made pasta with it, but what I don't know
    > anything about is what to buy.
    >
    > The last two times we had BBQs, we used ground sirloin from this local
    > place that had it on sale for $2.89 and $2.69 a pound. Boneless
    > sirloin on sale is usually about $3.99 and Fairway has prime sirloin
    > for london broil at $4.99.
    >
    > So, how do they get down to $2.89 and $2.69. What do they add to it
    > to bring down the price? This ground sirloin was 92% lean. Could
    > that be from a peice of sirloin for london broil. What am I missing
    > here?
    >
    > I really like the taste of sirlon, so is there anything I should add
    > to a piece of sirlon london broil to get the fat content down up to
    > 10% or 90% lean.
    >
    > What is the difference between sirloin and top sirloin? Is prime
    > sirloin better than choice top sirloin? What are the differences?
    >
    > Alan


    If you are just going to grind it, get whatever is cheaper.
    It won't matter. :)

    Try ground Brisket sometime...
    It's amazing.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  6. Andy

    Andy Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    > Try ground Brisket sometime...
    > It's amazing.
    > --
    > Om.



    Om,

    I'm going to try that, as long as it's not breaking some age-old BBQ
    law. ;)

    Thanks,

    Andy
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q>
    wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > > Try ground Brisket sometime...
    > > It's amazing.
    > > --
    > > Om.

    >
    >
    > Om,
    >
    > I'm going to try that, as long as it's not breaking some age-old BBQ
    > law. ;)
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Andy


    Hee! No, it's not. :)
    I normally make it myself but was surprised the other day to find it at
    the store!

    It really has a different texture and flavor IMHO.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  8. "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > It really has a different texture and flavor IMHO.
    > --
    > Om.


    Brisket is the main ingredient in beef hot dogs.
     
  9. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > alan[remove][email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > I never ground meat for hamburgers. I have a Kitchen aid mixer with
    > > the grinder and pasta extruder attachment. I think I can figure out
    > > how to use it, I have made pasta with it, but what I don't know
    > > anything about is what to buy.
    > >
    > > The last two times we had BBQs, we used ground sirloin from this local
    > > place that had it on sale for $2.89 and $2.69 a pound. Boneless
    > > sirloin on sale is usually about $3.99 and Fairway has prime sirloin
    > > for london broil at $4.99.
    > >
    > > So, how do they get down to $2.89 and $2.69. What do they add to it
    > > to bring down the price? This ground sirloin was 92% lean. Could
    > > that be from a peice of sirloin for london broil. What am I missing
    > > here?
    > >
    > > I really like the taste of sirlon, so is there anything I should add
    > > to a piece of sirlon london broil to get the fat content down up to
    > > 10% or 90% lean.
    > >
    > > What is the difference between sirloin and top sirloin? Is prime
    > > sirloin better than choice top sirloin? What are the differences?
    > >
    > > Alan

    >
    > If you are just going to grind it, get whatever is cheaper.
    > It won't matter. :)
    >
    > Try ground Brisket sometime...
    > It's amazing.


    Since when is brisket cheap? A chunk of flat cut brisket costs about
    $6-$7/lb, and if you buy whole brisket it may seem cheaper but by the
    time you trim away enough fat to make it edible for burgers it'll cost
    as much as $6-$7/lb. Amazing, eh? Besides, even if it's ground three
    times brisket is still too tough for anything but braise.

    Sheldon
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > alan[remove][email protected] wrote:
    > >
    > > > I never ground meat for hamburgers. I have a Kitchen aid mixer with
    > > > the grinder and pasta extruder attachment. I think I can figure out
    > > > how to use it, I have made pasta with it, but what I don't know
    > > > anything about is what to buy.
    > > >
    > > > The last two times we had BBQs, we used ground sirloin from this local
    > > > place that had it on sale for $2.89 and $2.69 a pound. Boneless
    > > > sirloin on sale is usually about $3.99 and Fairway has prime sirloin
    > > > for london broil at $4.99.
    > > >
    > > > So, how do they get down to $2.89 and $2.69. What do they add to it
    > > > to bring down the price? This ground sirloin was 92% lean. Could
    > > > that be from a peice of sirloin for london broil. What am I missing
    > > > here?
    > > >
    > > > I really like the taste of sirlon, so is there anything I should add
    > > > to a piece of sirlon london broil to get the fat content down up to
    > > > 10% or 90% lean.
    > > >
    > > > What is the difference between sirloin and top sirloin? Is prime
    > > > sirloin better than choice top sirloin? What are the differences?
    > > >
    > > > Alan

    > >
    > > If you are just going to grind it, get whatever is cheaper.
    > > It won't matter. :)
    > >
    > > Try ground Brisket sometime...
    > > It's amazing.

    >
    > Since when is brisket cheap? A chunk of flat cut brisket costs about
    > $6-$7/lb, and if you buy whole brisket it may seem cheaper but by the
    > time you trim away enough fat to make it edible for burgers it'll cost
    > as much as $6-$7/lb. Amazing, eh? Besides, even if it's ground three
    > times brisket is still too tough for anything but braise.
    >
    > Sheldon
    >


    Maybe where you live luv. :)

    Even trimmed (all those huge slabs of fat trimmed off) it's only priced
    at around $2.99 per lb. around the holidays.
    The untrimmed are $1.29 per lb. or lower.

    And ground, no, it's not tough.
    Not using the kitchen aid.

    Try it. I dare ya!
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  11. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Edwin Pawlowski wrote:
    > "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >
    > > It really has a different texture and flavor IMHO.
    > > --
    > > Om.

    >
    > Brisket is the main ingredient in beef hot dogs.


    I don't think so. All commercial hot dogs are made from mystery meat.
    Non kosher beef hot dogs are made from mystery meat (scraps) from the
    *entire* animal. Kosher hot dogs are made from mystery meat too, but
    scraps from the *entire* forequarter only, it will include brisket but
    only the trimmings... still, if one had to stipulate proportions most
    would be chuck, the trimmings. No commercial hot dogs are made from
    just one specific cut, and not from parts that are usually sold as a
    named cut, and certainly not from animals that qualify for the higher
    USDA Grades, commercial hot dogs are made from Beef at the lower end of
    the USDA Grades. Hot dogs are made from trimmings... same as balogna,
    salami, and all other similar sausage/cold cuts. When made at home one
    can pick, choose, and refuse, but not when you buy commercial products,
    then it's 100% pure mystery meat and from the lowest grades...
    remember, kosher says nothing about USDA Grades, an old ox can be just
    as kosher as a young calf... there definitely was no USDA way back
    then. So there's yet another benefit of preparing your own from meat
    you grind yourself, you control which grade... not only is pre-ground
    beef of unknown cuts it's also primarily of the very lowest grades with
    only the trimmings of better grades thrown in... it's mystery meat.

    http://www.hebrewnational.com/pages/kosher/index.jsp

    Sheldon
     
  12. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > > alan[remove][email protected] wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > I never ground meat for hamburgers. I have a Kitchen aid mixer with
    > > > > the grinder and pasta extruder attachment. I think I can figure out
    > > > > how to use it, I have made pasta with it, but what I don't know
    > > > > anything about is what to buy.
    > > > >
    > > > > The last two times we had BBQs, we used ground sirloin from this local
    > > > > place that had it on sale for $2.89 and $2.69 a pound. Boneless
    > > > > sirloin on sale is usually about $3.99 and Fairway has prime sirloin
    > > > > for london broil at $4.99.
    > > > >
    > > > > So, how do they get down to $2.89 and $2.69. What do they add to it
    > > > > to bring down the price? This ground sirloin was 92% lean. Could
    > > > > that be from a peice of sirloin for london broil. What am I missing
    > > > > here?
    > > > >
    > > > > I really like the taste of sirlon, so is there anything I should add
    > > > > to a piece of sirlon london broil to get the fat content down up to
    > > > > 10% or 90% lean.
    > > > >
    > > > > What is the difference between sirloin and top sirloin? Is prime
    > > > > sirloin better than choice top sirloin? What are the differences?
    > > > >
    > > > > Alan
    > > >
    > > > If you are just going to grind it, get whatever is cheaper.
    > > > It won't matter. :)
    > > >
    > > > Try ground Brisket sometime...
    > > > It's amazing.

    > >
    > > Since when is brisket cheap? A chunk of flat cut brisket costs about
    > > $6-$7/lb, and if you buy whole brisket it may seem cheaper but by the
    > > time you trim away enough fat to make it edible for burgers it'll cost
    > > as much as $6-$7/lb. Amazing, eh? Besides, even if it's ground three
    > > times brisket is still too tough for anything but braise.
    > >
    > > Sheldon
    > >

    >
    > Maybe where you live luv. :)
    >
    > Even trimmed (all those huge slabs of fat trimmed off) it's only priced
    > at around $2.99 per lb. around the holidays.
    > The untrimmed are $1.29 per lb. or lower.
    >
    > And ground, no, it's not tough.
    > Not using the kitchen aid.
    >
    > Try it. I dare ya!


    I have, it sux... For burgers, unless heavily seasoned, it tastes
    almost gamey, and has a gritty texture, similar to partially cooked
    couscous. Even you admited it had a different texture, and flavor...
    in your last post you wrote: "It really has a different texture and
    flavor IMHO." Depends what you're used to... perhaps in your neck of
    deliverence country road kill burgers are all the rage.

    Brisket is excellent when heavily seasoned and cooked long and slow,
    I'd not recommend it for burgers.

    Btw, anyone with the mind set that grinding their own meat is a way to
    be cheap should stick to stupidmarket mystery meat.

    And that teensy toys r us KA attachment does NOT qualify as a meat
    grinder.

    Sheldon
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > "Sheldon" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    > > > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > > > alan[remove][email protected] wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > > I never ground meat for hamburgers. I have a Kitchen aid mixer with
    > > > > > the grinder and pasta extruder attachment. I think I can figure out
    > > > > > how to use it, I have made pasta with it, but what I don't know
    > > > > > anything about is what to buy.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > The last two times we had BBQs, we used ground sirloin from this local
    > > > > > place that had it on sale for $2.89 and $2.69 a pound. Boneless
    > > > > > sirloin on sale is usually about $3.99 and Fairway has prime sirloin
    > > > > > for london broil at $4.99.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > So, how do they get down to $2.89 and $2.69. What do they add to it
    > > > > > to bring down the price? This ground sirloin was 92% lean. Could
    > > > > > that be from a peice of sirloin for london broil. What am I missing
    > > > > > here?
    > > > > >
    > > > > > I really like the taste of sirlon, so is there anything I should add
    > > > > > to a piece of sirlon london broil to get the fat content down up to
    > > > > > 10% or 90% lean.
    > > > > >
    > > > > > What is the difference between sirloin and top sirloin? Is prime
    > > > > > sirloin better than choice top sirloin? What are the differences?
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Alan
    > > > >
    > > > > If you are just going to grind it, get whatever is cheaper.
    > > > > It won't matter. :)
    > > > >
    > > > > Try ground Brisket sometime...
    > > > > It's amazing.
    > > >
    > > > Since when is brisket cheap? A chunk of flat cut brisket costs about
    > > > $6-$7/lb, and if you buy whole brisket it may seem cheaper but by the
    > > > time you trim away enough fat to make it edible for burgers it'll cost
    > > > as much as $6-$7/lb. Amazing, eh? Besides, even if it's ground three
    > > > times brisket is still too tough for anything but braise.
    > > >
    > > > Sheldon
    > > >

    > >
    > > Maybe where you live luv. :)
    > >
    > > Even trimmed (all those huge slabs of fat trimmed off) it's only priced
    > > at around $2.99 per lb. around the holidays.
    > > The untrimmed are $1.29 per lb. or lower.
    > >
    > > And ground, no, it's not tough.
    > > Not using the kitchen aid.
    > >
    > > Try it. I dare ya!

    >
    > I have, it sux... For burgers, unless heavily seasoned, it tastes
    > almost gamey, and has a gritty texture, similar to partially cooked
    > couscous. Even you admited it had a different texture, and flavor...
    > in your last post you wrote: "It really has a different texture and
    > flavor IMHO." Depends what you're used to... perhaps in your neck of
    > deliverence country road kill burgers are all the rage.
    >
    > Brisket is excellent when heavily seasoned and cooked long and slow,
    > I'd not recommend it for burgers.
    >
    > Btw, anyone with the mind set that grinding their own meat is a way to
    > be cheap should stick to stupidmarket mystery meat.
    >
    > And that teensy toys r us KA attachment does NOT qualify as a meat
    > grinder.
    >
    > Sheldon
    >


    It works for small amounts...
    I don't do a lot of meat grinding.
    There is no reason too.

    Last time I used it it was with the sauasage cone to make some Boudin.

    Cheers!
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  14. Which brisket, the full or the flat cut?

    On Sun, 04 Sep 2005 04:12:29 -0500, OmManiPadmeOmelet
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > alan[remove][email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> I never ground meat for hamburgers. I have a Kitchen aid mixer with
    >> the grinder and pasta extruder attachment. I think I can figure out
    >> how to use it, I have made pasta with it, but what I don't know
    >> anything about is what to buy.
    >>
    >> The last two times we had BBQs, we used ground sirloin from this local
    >> place that had it on sale for $2.89 and $2.69 a pound. Boneless
    >> sirloin on sale is usually about $3.99 and Fairway has prime sirloin
    >> for london broil at $4.99.
    >>
    >> So, how do they get down to $2.89 and $2.69. What do they add to it
    >> to bring down the price? This ground sirloin was 92% lean. Could
    >> that be from a peice of sirloin for london broil. What am I missing
    >> here?
    >>
    >> I really like the taste of sirlon, so is there anything I should add
    >> to a piece of sirlon london broil to get the fat content down up to
    >> 10% or 90% lean.
    >>
    >> What is the difference between sirloin and top sirloin? Is prime
    >> sirloin better than choice top sirloin? What are the differences?
    >>
    >> Alan

    >
    >If you are just going to grind it, get whatever is cheaper.
    >It won't matter. :)
    >
    >Try ground Brisket sometime...
    >It's amazing.
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>,
    alan[remove][email protected] wrote:

    > Which brisket, the full or the flat cut?
    >


    I buy the cheap ones.
    The full cut with that big fat slab.

    I trim the majority of that fat slab off. ;-)
    It gets cut up for the chickens...
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
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