H*****s

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Simon Brooke, Sep 15, 2004.

  1. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    Aren't they bloody uncomfortable?

    I wore mine for tonight's time trial - first time in ages - and I'd
    forgotten. It's a good one and it fits properly, but... Crikey, people
    really ride in these things? Voluntarily? They need their heads
    examined.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    Morning had broken. I found a rather battered tube of Araldite
    resin in the bottom of the toolbag.
     
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  2. elyob

    elyob Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Aren't they bloody uncomfortable?
    >
    > I wore mine for tonight's time trial - first time in ages - and I'd
    > forgotten. It's a good one and it fits properly, but... Crikey, people
    > really ride in these things? Voluntarily? They need their heads
    > examined.


    Hate them myself. I do a thousand miles a quarter and haven't needed one
    yet. Occasionaly I turn off my headphones ;)
     
  3. Woody

    Woody Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Aren't they bloody uncomfortable?

    Not for me

    >
    > I wore mine for tonight's time trial - first time in ages - and I'd
    > forgotten. It's a good one and it fits properly,

    then it should not be uncomfortable!

    > but... Crikey, people
    > really ride in these things? Voluntarily? They need their heads
    > examined.
    >

    No, just that everyone has their own opinon. You can choose to not wear one
    and I can choose to wear one and we should respect each other's choice
    rather than have a go at those who don't agree with yours.

    I choose to wear a helmet but I totally oppose any compulsion to make anyone
    else wear one.

    Woody
     
  4. Ian

    Ian Guest

    On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 23:05:04 GMT, Simon Brooke <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Aren't they bloody uncomfortable?


    I thought these bu**ers were compulsory. It's a Trek Vapor2, very
    light. So when I bought a bike, I bought a helmet. Went 1/2 mile. then
    cycled back home to put it back in box before proceeding any further.

    Not impressed. When I have fallen, it's been my shins, knees and
    elbows that have copped it. Pads in these regions would have been a
    better investment.
     
  5. >Aren't they bloody uncomfortable?
    >
    >I wore mine for tonight's time trial - first time in ages - and I'd
    >forgotten. It's a good one and it fits properly, but... Crikey, people
    >really ride in these things? Voluntarily? They need their heads
    >examined.


    Okay Simon - you don't like them, but I like mine. No, it's not uncomfortable
    either and it's not too hot. Funnily enough, Vernon doesn't find his
    uncomfortable and Nathan finds his Louis Garneau TT and his Met Stradivaruis
    positively *kewl*. Not everyone finds them uncomfortable. If yours is, I
    suggest it isn't actually the correct one for you.

    Cheers, helen s


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  6. Gonzalez

    Gonzalez Guest

    On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 23:05:04 GMT, Simon Brooke <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Aren't they bloody uncomfortable?
    >
    >I wore mine for tonight's time trial - first time in ages - and I'd
    >forgotten. It's a good one and it fits properly, but... Crikey, people
    >really ride in these things? Voluntarily? They need their heads
    >examined.


    I bought my helmet when I started teaching - and wore it religiously
    for five years commuting to and from school to set a good example to
    the children.

    However, having read this NG for the last three years and the
    arguments concerning helmets, I have stopped using mine. This is to
    promote cycling to the children as a safe healthy activity which needs
    no special safety equipment commonly used by rock climbers, miners,
    racing car drivers and motorcyclists.
     
  7. >This is to
    >promote cycling to the children as a safe healthy activity which needs
    >no special safety equipment commonly used by rock climbers, miners,
    >racing car drivers and motorcyclists.


    And on the other hand, the wearing of a helmet has not put off my son from
    cycling, nor has it made him view cycling as a particularly dangerous activity.
    He cycles for leisure, to commute to college & back and competitively in local
    time trials. He *knows* his Met Stradivarius and his Louis Garneau helmets are
    *kewl*. He knows the risks and the benefits of cycling and he loves cycling. He
    knows that the wearing of a helmet does not render him invincible as he has
    been taught to cycle safely and assertively by his parents and by encouragement
    from members of the club we belong to. He's happy to use lights,
    flourescent/reflectives, and wear a helmet. He even stops at red lights and he
    doesn't cycle on the pavement as that's for little kids and he has a quite
    stunning look of disdain for any adults he sees cycling on a footpath.

    Cheers, helen s










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  8. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers [email protected]omcom opined the
    following...
    > Okay Simon - you don't like them, but I like mine. No, it's not uncomfortable
    > either and it's not too hot.


    Without wishing to drag this one into another h*lm*t flame war, how far
    had you ridden without a helmet before you started wearing one?

    I strongly suspect that those who have "always" worn one will consider
    the discomfort to be normal and thus not register it. Those who
    habitually cycle without one will notice the difference when forced to
    wear one.

    > Funnily enough, Vernon doesn't find his
    > uncomfortable and Nathan finds his Louis Garneau TT and his Met Stradivaruis
    > positively *kewl*. Not everyone finds them uncomfortable. If yours is, I
    > suggest it isn't actually the correct one for you.


    The correct one for me (From past experience) would basically consist of
    a polystyrene hairnet. I overheat rapidly otherwise. The (already
    arguable) benefits would then be so small as to make it a public gesture
    rather than a practical consideration.

    We seem to have a problem in this country where an individual is not
    able to take full legal responsibility for their actions. It is a
    problem that the climbing centres have suffered from as well. You are
    asked to sign a document that shows that you understand the risks and
    take responsibility for your actions and their consequences. Despite
    this, people who have hurt themselves while climbing (Through no fault
    of the centres) have successfully sued the centres with the aid of the
    ambulance chasers. The result? Increased insurance premiums and thus
    increased entry fees.

    I would like to see a legal waiver that would hold up in court that
    would allow a rider to opt out of helmet wearing and accept that
    responsibility themselves. Until this is possible, I fail to see how
    race events can allow competitors any choice.

    Jon
     
  9. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    elyob wrote:


    >
    >
    > Occasionaly I turn off my headphones ;)
    >


    Presumably worn to protect your ears if you fall off ;-)

    Tony
     
  10. "Woody" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<%[email protected]>...
    >
    > I choose to wear a helmet but I totally oppose any compulsion to make anyone
    > else wear one.
    >


    Couldn't agree more - I choose to wear a helmet, but that's not
    everybody's choice and nor should it be; 'each to his/her own' is the
    best policy here (as opposed to one of compulsory helmets).

    David E. Belcher
     
  11. Ian <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 23:05:04 GMT, Simon Brooke <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    > I thought these bu**ers were compulsory.


    Nope. Not even for racing, in some cases; helmets are still optional
    (for now) for time trials run under CTT rules & regs.

    David E. Belcher
     
  12. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers wrote:

    > He's happy to use lights,
    > flourescent/reflectives, and wear a helmet.


    Thread running on the Cambridge Cycling Campaign newsgroup at the moment
    triggered by an anecdotal observation by a cyclist who found he had far
    more close calls wearing a fluorescent jacket than not. Response has
    been overwhelmingly to confirm that experience. Lots of speculation as
    to why that might be.

    Tony
     
  13. >Without wishing to drag this one into another h*lm*t flame war, how far
    >had you ridden without a helmet before you started wearing one?


    The above has nothing whatsoever to do with my choice to wear a helmet.

    >I strongly suspect that those who have "always" worn one will consider
    >the discomfort to be normal and thus not register it. Those who
    >habitually cycle without one will notice the difference when forced to
    >wear one.


    Suspect all you like. As far as my bonce is concerned, I know if something on
    it is uncomfortable. Let me repeat, when I wear a helmet when cycling it is
    *not* uncomfortable. Let me repeat, neither Vernon nor Nathan find it
    uncomfortable.

    >The correct one for me (From past experience) would basically consist of
    >a polystyrene hairnet. I overheat rapidly otherwise. The (already
    >arguable) benefits would then be so small as to make it a public gesture
    >rather than a practical consideration.


    If you choose not to wear one, that is entirely your choice. What I find mildly
    amusing to mildy irritating is the view along the lines of "how can *anyone*
    wear one of these hot and uncomfortable things? They must be out of their
    minds!" especially when it clearly isn't being said in a funny way.

    Cheers, helen s





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  14. >Couldn't agree more - I choose to wear a helmet, but that's not
    >everybody's choice and nor should it be; 'each to his/her own' is the
    >best policy here (as opposed to one of compulsory helmets).


    Quite and a bit less of the patronising bullshit towards those of us who do
    choose to wear a helmet wouldn't go amiss either :)

    Cheers, helen s


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  15. >helmets are still optional
    >(for now) for time trials run under CTT rules & regs.


    For adults, yes, but for the under 18s they are compulsory.

    Cheers, helen s


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  16. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 16/9/04 8:35 am, in article [email protected], "Tony Raven"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers wrote:
    >
    >> He's happy to use lights,
    >> flourescent/reflectives, and wear a helmet.

    >
    > Thread running on the Cambridge Cycling Campaign newsgroup at the moment
    > triggered by an anecdotal observation by a cyclist who found he had far
    > more close calls wearing a fluorescent jacket than not. Response has
    > been overwhelmingly to confirm that experience. Lots of speculation as
    > to why that might be.


    Hmm.. seeing as I normally ride into work in a fluo bike jacket, I'm
    beginning to wonder..

    I had some dozy *** start to pull out on me this morning. I'm doing about 25
    down hill, middle of the lane and the road is damp. He looks through me, I
    recognise the vacant look and start to brake, he moves when I am about 10m
    away, I brake hard, shout loud enough for most of Dundee to hear (Pete, that
    was the loud shout at just gone 8am) and manage to slide the back wheel a
    bit as the front takes most of the braking load. Fortunately the driver
    stopped before I could make up my mind whether to hit him sideways or head
    on so I went round the front.

    Was he dazzled by my dirty yellow coat on a drizzly day, or was it a
    SMIWL...

    ...d
     
  17. Roos Eisma

    Roos Eisma Guest

    Jon Senior <jon_AT_restlesslemon_DOTco_DOT_uk> writes:

    >I strongly suspect that those who have "always" worn one will consider
    >the discomfort to be normal and thus not register it. Those who
    >habitually cycle without one will notice the difference when forced to
    >wear one.


    I wore one last Sunday when we were mountainbiking in Glentress. I had the
    same problem as with my kayaking helmet, that when I get sweaty I get
    incredibly itchy in my hair and then find myself riding with one hand
    while the other hand tries to find the right hole in the helmet to scratch
    the itchy spot :)

    And I didn't fall off.

    Roos
     
  18. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    dirtylitterboxofferingstospammers wrote:

    > Okay Simon - you don't like them, but I like mine. No, it's not uncomfortable
    > either and it's not too hot. Funnily enough, Vernon doesn't find his
    > uncomfortable and Nathan finds his Louis Garneau TT and his Met Stradivaruis
    > positively *kewl*.


    Levels of discomfort are relative. Does Nathan think his is so cool he
    wears it around the house? If it's "not uncomfortable", period, then by
    my reckoning one shouldn't notice it at all. "Not uncomfortable" and
    "not /too/ uncomfortable" strike me as different things.

    Mine isn't too uncomfortable that I didn't wear it zooming around
    Glentress on the MTB last Sunday, or indeed for every trip I made on a
    bike up until the not too distant past, but it's still less comfortable
    than when it isn't there, so I hung it off the bars for the ride back
    into Peebles, and usually have a cotton Bianchi cap as my usual cycling
    headwear (and I'm sure you'll agree that that's a /much/ cooler colour
    than your lid!).

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  19. >
    >Levels of discomfort are relative. Does Nathan think his is so cool he
    >wears it around the house?


    Actually yes. He acquired the Met Strad last night - a present for doing well
    in his GCSEs - it had to be prised from his head before going to bed. It was on
    top of his bonce as he set off this morning to cycle to college, complete with
    him wearing CSC long-sleeved jersey with CSC short-sleeved jersey underneath.
    No doubt he can dream about being in the peloton as he cycles along. Teenagers
    are a strange breed, aren't they;-.

    >If it's "not uncomfortable", period, then by
    >my reckoning one shouldn't notice it at all.


    Quite. It's *not* uncomfortable.Why should it appear to be strange to find that
    some people actually don't find the wearing of a helmet uncomfortable, too hot,
    too sweaty??

    > "Not uncomfortable" and
    >"not /too/ uncomfortable" strike me as different things.


    Let me repeat - mine is not uncomfortable. YMMV :)

    Cheers, helen s


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  20. Woody wrote:

    >> Aren't they bloody uncomfortable?

    > Not for me


    I used to think so too until I started riding without one more of the time.
    And then I realised that actually they are bloody uncomfortable ;-)

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington
    University
     
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