Haggling?

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by RedRider2009, Jan 30, 2008.

  1. RedRider2009

    RedRider2009 New Member

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    Howdy, I am about to buy my first road bike because the bike I currently ride is an old hand-me down. When buying something this expensive is there any sway in prices? Are bike stores like car dealer who get comission and are looking to sell a lot at the end of the month? I am just wondering so I do not make a foolish mistake. Thanks
     
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  2. Cycler6n

    Cycler6n New Member

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    where I by my bikes there isn't haggling, but look around for good deals, I found my bike on a sale with $600 off.
     
  3. TheDarkLord

    TheDarkLord New Member

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    I think the general wisdom is that one shouldn't haggle too much about bike prices at the shops. Instead of haggling about the price, it is better if you can negotiate deals with the shops regarding services (e.g. a free tune-up), or get other accessories for reduced price. I *think* most of the profit for bike shops comes from selling accessories and not from selling bikes.

    Oh, and one way to get a good sale is when the shop wants to sell off their inventory of a model of the previous year.
     
  4. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    Most bicycle shops pay their sales people a salary without a commission on bikes sold. Those that do pay a commission pay only very small commission. Attempting to haggle is not generally tolerated. As Cycler6n suggested, the best thing is to shop around and look for a deal. The best time to shop is past as bicycle shops, like other businesses, try to move inventory prior to the end of the year. You might still find a good buy on a 2006 or 2007 bike. There are also still some good buys to be had on line.

    The one thing that you want is a bike that fits you. You can haggle a little here by asking the bike shop to throw in a fitting for free as long as you purchase a bike from them. A good, comprehensive fitting costs anywhere from $75.00 up to $120.00, so getting them to fit you at no charge would be a pretty good deal;).
     
  5. Jdub410

    Jdub410 New Member

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    what exactly is a fitting?
     
  6. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    Click on the link below and it will take you through a fitting.
    http://www.competitivecyclist.com/za/CCY?PAGE=FIT_CALCULATOR_INTRO
    Basically a fitting is taking measurements of your body such as your inseam, reach, height, etc., and using this information to get the correct frame that fits your body and setting it up with the best seat post, stem, and other items that fits you bodily dimensions.

    A simple example where fitting is used is in the following situation. Someone with very long legs would need a tall frame. However, if he has a short torso, he will be stretched out like Superman in flight. Therefore he would need a bike with a shorter top tube. To take care of him, his LBS would probably go down a size smaller from the frame with the optimum seat tube length to get a shorter top tube. They would then adjust the seat post to get the optimum seat height for his leg length. If he has long arms, they can put a longer stem on the bike, or a shorter one if he has short arms.

    One really important part of fit is the saddle. The distance between your ischial tuberosities (sit bones) needs to be determined so that the proper width seat can be put on your bike. Your LBS will probably have you sit on some kind of cushion or cardboard and measure the impression to determine the width between your sit bones. They will then suggest that you use a certain width of saddle so that your weight is supported by your sit bones and not the soft flesh in between them. If your saddle is not wide enough, you will experience some very intense pain during and after each ride. They will also adjust the tilt of the saddle so that you are not putting too much pressure on other parts of your anatomy.

    In a nutshell, fitting is getting the right size bicycle to ensure a comfortable ride. Fitting is essential! You won't ride if it is not comfortable.
     
  7. Jdub410

    Jdub410 New Member

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    wow, thanks for the useful info. that really helps answer some of the additional questions i had. i appreciate it.
     
  8. Camilo

    Camilo New Member

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    My opinion is that it is always acceptable to do polite haggling. Example: "Can you discount that at all?" or "Is that price firm or is there some give?". Some such thing. Also, I'm usually up front about alternative pricing. Example (say for wheels the shop's selling for $500). "I can get them from XYZ for $450 including shipping. Can you get you match that or get a little closer? I'd rather buy locally." In this example, I'd be happy to pay $475 locally. I will almost always be willing to pay something to buy locally because of convenience and service, but not a lot. Most shops I think understand this, and want to be reasonable if they can. On the other hand, I buy almost everything locally if they have it in stock the day I'm looking for it, without haggling!

    If you can get the same product or equivalent locally for less, by all means mention that and give your favorite shop a chance to get your business.

    Depending on the merchant, you can get aggressive or just make one polite request like that. For bike stuff, I'd tend to at least give it a shot, but not aggressive. It would be pretty common to be countered with some accessories, since they're giving them to me at wholesale and I'm valuing them at retail. I wouldn't be at all surprised if they'd throw in $100 of accessories rather than discount $100.
     
  9. swimmer88

    swimmer88 New Member

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    I haggled for my first bike...it was listed for $1100 and I told them I didn't want to spend more than $1000. The sales guy went to talk to his manager and came back and said he would give me the bike tax free. So i saved about 7-8%.

    When it comes to haggling...do your homework. Go into the shop at the end of the day, and at the end of the month. The store probably is desperate to sell bikes at that point so their sales look good on the books for that month. This is the optimal time to haggle. Also, shop around for deals at other places, you can use it as leverage.

    The most important point is to be polite, no one is going to give you a discount if you are a jerk.
     
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