Half Marathon, Hopefully

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Jenn, Oct 1, 2003.

  1. Jenn

    Jenn Guest

    Right now I run/walk 6 miles in about one hour. I would like to try and see how I do in a half
    marathon October 26. Any advice on how I should prepare for this? Thank you! Jenn
     
    Tags:


  2. Well You should be able to make it.

    That time gives you a little under four weeks which means a little less than three weeks of
    speed/distance training. That last week should be mostly restful with just a few short runs at
    your planed pace. Most people do better with this week of rest than if they trained hard during
    it. Some may suggest two weeks of rest before a half marathon.

    In the mean time I suggest not worrying about speed, but work on distance/time for most of your
    runs. You did not tell us how often you run but I suggest three to five times a week. At least
    two of those time you should work on distance

    Your 10 minute pace is not bad, but if you are doing it running and walking, I believe you would
    race better by running slower and less walking. Try to walk no more than one or two minutes out
    of every mile. If you can do it go without walking at all; I suspect you can. Try to add to that
    time/distance. Stretch it out as your body allows. Don't overdo it. Try to add an additional
    mile or 10 minutes each week so you will have done 1:30 or about 9 miles by the end of the
    primary training.

    Try to go for a 11 or 12 minute pace during the race, I think you can do it, but don't try any
    faster. Faster at the start will only mean a very slow finish and will result in a slower run in
    the end. You can't get back the energy you wasted at the start. You can speed up late in the
    race if you feel up to it during the last three miles. If it works for you do run/walk during
    the race. I suggest keeping that one or two minutes per
    mile. Do it from the start.

    This is rather conventional advice but it seems to work for most people. If you find something
    else works for you, then do something else. Each of us is different so cherish the difference.

    Good Luck and let us know how it works out.

    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math

    "Jenn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Right now I run/walk 6 miles in about one hour. I would like to try and see how I do in a half
    > marathon October 26. Any advice on how I should prepare for this? Thank you! Jenn
     
  3. Globaldisc

    Globaldisc Guest

    Jenn...hate to take an unsupportive posture w/your ambition however this is rec.running and not
    rec.walking and I don't think you're quite ready for a
    1/2M, unless you're content walking for the majority of the event.

    If right now you're unable to run for 6 miles...why enter a running event some weeks away wherein
    the course is 13.2Miles? You'll end up walking the majority of the course. If you're OK with that,
    go for it.

    I would more so encourage you to enter local 5K and 10K races. Based on what you've said, I say
    "running" a full 10K is a bigger achievement than finishing a 1/2M wherein you walk for half plus
    the miles.

    I just feel there's more personal achievement to be derived in conquering a venue (race) in line
    with its intent (running event). You'll have your 1/2M's and eventually full M's in days ahead of
    you...but I would never justify entering a running event knowing I will be walking for a portion of
    it. That's biting off more than you can chew...just an opinion...and that's also why I don't even
    think about Ultras...

    Andrew...
     
  4. Win

    Win Guest

    On 30 Sep 2003 20:41:28 -0700, [email protected] (Jenn) wrote:

    >Right now I run/walk 6 miles in about one hour. I would like to try and see how I do in a half
    >marathon October 26. Any advice on how I should prepare for this? Thank you! Jenn

    Oh, you'll win, I'm sure of it...
     
  5. Win

    Win Guest

    On 01 Oct 2003 10:05:36 GMT, [email protected] (Globaldisc) wrote:

    >If right now you're unable to run for 6 miles...why enter a running event some weeks away wherein
    >the course is 13.2Miles?

    Because she likes pain and injury (and she's none too bright).
     
  6. I'd support Joseph's suggestions....especially about extending your training distance. Until you
    try extending your run/walk session (building up to those 2+ hours) you won't know how your body
    will cope...

    ....for example, when I first started to build up distance (from a very low base!) my legs used to
    tighten up and I'd really lose speed/energy around 5 miles. But now I train longer distances, the
    difficult point is around 8.5 miles but goes away again around 10 miles. I know I have to take an
    energy drink with me, and I know which one works well for me.

    These are things that you may not be able to work out in time for October
    26. But why not try? Just please don't be upset with yourself if you can not make it on the
    day......it's better to stop when you body really says NO (not just grumbles) and be able
    to run again later that week than to persist and have bad injuries or quit running cos it
    was so awful.

    So yes you can do the race - it's a question of is it a bit too early for you? Maybe there is a
    shorter "fun" race attached to the 1/2M?

    Good luck if you go for it....and let us know how it went !

    Cheers, Hedgehog "Joseph Meehan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Well You should be able to make it.
    >
    > That time gives you a little under four weeks which means a little
    less
    > than three weeks of speed/distance training. That last week should be mostly restful with just a
    > few short runs at your planed pace. Most people do better with this week of rest than if they
    > trained hard during it.
    Some
    > may suggest two weeks of rest before a half marathon.
    >
    > In the mean time I suggest not worrying about speed, but work on
    > distance/time for most of your runs. You did not tell us how often you
    run
    > but I suggest three to five times a week. At least two of those time you should work on distance
    >
    > Your 10 minute pace is not bad, but if you are doing it running and walking, I believe you
    > would race better by running slower and less
    walking.
    > Try to walk no more than one or two minutes out of every mile. If you can do it go without walking
    > at all; I suspect you can. Try to add to that time/distance. Stretch it out as your body allows.
    > Don't overdo it. Try to add an additional mile or 10 minutes each week so you will have done
    27:30
    > or about 9 miles by the end of the primary training.
    >
    > Try to go for a 11 or 12 minute pace during the race, I think you can
    do
    > it, but don't try any faster. Faster at the start will only mean a very slow finish and will
    > result in a slower run in the end. You can't get
    back
    > the energy you wasted at the start. You can speed up late in the race if you feel up to it during
    > the last three miles. If it works for you do run/walk during the race. I suggest keeping that one
    > or two minutes per
    > mile. Do it from the start.
    >
    > This is rather conventional advice but it seems to work for most
    people.
    > If you find something else works for you, then do something else. Each of us is different so
    > cherish the difference.
    >
    > Good Luck and let us know how it works out.
    >
    > --
    > Joseph E. Meehan
    >
    > 26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    >
    >
    > "Jenn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Right now I run/walk 6 miles in about one hour. I would like to try and see how I do in a half
    > > marathon October 26. Any advice on how I should prepare for this? Thank you! Jenn
     
  7. Jenn

    Jenn Guest

    Thanks for your support. I agree, why not try? I'll be sure to let you know how it went! :)

    "Hedgehog & Markarina" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I'd support Joseph's suggestions....especially about extending your training distance. Until you
    > try extending your run/walk session (building up to those 2+ hours) you won't know how your body
    > will cope...
    >
    > ....for example, when I first started to build up distance (from a very low base!) my legs used to
    > tighten up and I'd really lose speed/energy around 5 miles. But now I train longer distances, the
    > difficult point is around 8.5 miles but goes away again around 10 miles. I know I have to take an
    > energy drink with me, and I know which one works well for me.
    >
    > These are things that you may not be able to work out in time for October
    > 26. But why not try? Just please don't be upset with yourself if you can not make it on the
    > day......it's better to stop when you body really says NO (not just grumbles) and be able to
    > run again later that week than to persist and have bad injuries or quit running cos it was so
    > awful.
    >
    > So yes you can do the race - it's a question of is it a bit too early for you? Maybe there is a
    > shorter "fun" race attached to the 1/2M?
    >
    > Good luck if you go for it....and let us know how it went !
    >
    > Cheers, Hedgehog "Joseph Meehan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Well You should be able to make it.
    > >
    > > That time gives you a little under four weeks which means a little
    > less
    > > than three weeks of speed/distance training. That last week should be mostly restful with just a
    > > few short runs at your planed pace. Most people do better with this week of rest than if they
    > > trained hard during it.
    > Some
    > > may suggest two weeks of rest before a half marathon.
    > >
    > > In the mean time I suggest not worrying about speed, but work on
    > > distance/time for most of your runs. You did not tell us how often you
    > run
    > > but I suggest three to five times a week. At least two of those time you should work on distance
    > >
    > > Your 10 minute pace is not bad, but if you are doing it running and walking, I believe you
    > > would race better by running slower and less
    > walking.
    > > Try to walk no more than one or two minutes out of every mile. If you can do it go without
    > > walking at all; I suspect you can. Try to add to that time/distance. Stretch it out as your
    > > body allows. Don't overdo it. Try to add an additional mile or 10 minutes each week so you will
    > > have done
    > 1:30
    > > or about 9 miles by the end of the primary training.
    > >
    > > Try to go for a 11 or 12 minute pace during the race, I think you can
    > do
    > > it, but don't try any faster. Faster at the start will only mean a very slow finish and will
    > > result in a slower run in the end. You can't get
    > back
    > > the energy you wasted at the start. You can speed up late in the race if you feel up to it
    > > during the last three miles. If it works for you do run/walk during the race. I suggest keeping
    > > that one or two minutes per
    > > mile. Do it from the start.
    > >
    > > This is rather conventional advice but it seems to work for most
    > people.
    > > If you find something else works for you, then do something else. Each of us is different so
    > > cherish the difference.
    > >
    > > Good Luck and let us know how it works out.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Joseph E. Meehan
    > >
    > > 26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
    > >
    > >
    > > "Jenn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Right now I run/walk 6 miles in about one hour. I would like to try and see how I do in a half
    > > > marathon October 26. Any advice on how I should prepare for this? Thank you! Jenn
    > >
     
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