HALLIBURTON BRIBES, LOOTS ... AND MAKES A "HEALTHY PROFIT"

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Polybus, Jan 24, 2004.

  1. Polybus

    Polybus Guest

    Halliburton staff sacked 'for taking bribes'

    Halliburton, the oil services company formerly run by the US vice-president, Dick Cheney, was
    yesterday embroiled in new accusations of corruption after it sacked two workers over allegations
    that they took kickbacks for awarding sub-contracts in Iraq. The company disclosed that
    investigations were going on into whether two of its staff took up to $6m (£3.3m) from a Kuwaiti-
    based company providing support for US troops.

    The revelation is likely to intensify the scrutiny of Halliburton, which has reaped huge contracts
    to rebuild Iraq and provide logistical support for the army. The total value of their contracts is
    more than $9bn, by far the largest sum handed out to a US firm in Iraq.

    American Democrats have accused the Bush administration of cronyism in Iraq.

    Halliburton is already facing allegations that it overcharged the US government for importing fuel
    to Iraq. The top defence department auditor last week asked the inspector general's office at the
    Pentagon to investigate whether the firm overcharged for petrol deliveries by more than $61m.

    Halliburton gave no further details about the two executives who allegedly accepted kickbacks, or
    the company that allegedly paid the bribes. The workers were based in the Kuwaiti office that also
    handled the petrol contract.

    The Kuwaiti firm overcharged by around $6m, and Halliburton said the two workers may have accepted
    improper payments as part of the over-billing.

    A Halliburton spokeswoman stressed that the company had brought the bribery allegations to the
    attention of the Penta gon itself. "Halliburton internal auditors found the irregularity, which is a
    violation of our company's philosophy, policy and our code of ethics. We found it quickly, and we
    immediately reported it to the inspector general," she said. "We do not tolerate this kind of
    behaviour by anyone at any level in any Halliburton company."

    If proven, the disclosures could expose the business to fraud charges or fines.

    The Pentagon is also reported to have raised broader questions about Halliburton's financial
    controls and billing for work in Iraq.

    The company's initial contract for rebuilding oil wells was secretly awarded to its Kellogg Brown &
    Root division without a competitive tender process, in March, before the invasion of Iraq.

    Last week, the company won the $1.2bn contract to replace that original deal after a long- awaited
    tender process.

    Henry Waxman, a California Democrat, said the granting of further work to Halliburton while an
    investigation into overcharging was going on was "mindboggling".

    Mr Cheney, who received a $33m severance package when he left Halliburton to run for office in 2000,
    defended the company in a radio interview this week. "They get unfairly maligned simply because of
    their past association with me," he said.

    Halliburton is also facing corruption charges in Nigeria. A French judge has reportedly said Mr
    Cheney himself could be charged over allegations that Halliburton paid bribes of $180m to the
    Nigerian government to secure rights to build a gas plant. Halliburton has denied any wrongdoing.
    January 24, 2004 The Guardian

    http://www.americanpolitics.com/20010217Halliburton.html
    http://www.americanpolitics.com/20010226Cheney.html

    Halliburton fires workers for kickbacks Compiled by IHT Staff From Dispatches (AP, Bloomberg)
    Saturday, January 24, 2004

    WASHINGTON: Halliburton announced Friday that it had dismissed employees who were accused of taking
    kickbacks from a Kuwaiti subcontractor helping to supply U.S. troops in Iraq.

    The disclosure is the first admission by Halliburton that its employees have been involved in
    possible corruption involving Iraq contracts. Wendy Hall, a spokeswoman, said Friday that the
    company had reported the "irregularities" to Pentagon auditors and criminal investigators.

    The Wall Street Journal reported Friday that two employees of a Halliburton subsidiary, KBR, had
    accepted up to $6 million in kickbacks from an unnamed Kuwaiti company. Hall said the company could
    not discuss specifics of the charges.

    "We found it quickly, and we immediately reported it," Hall said in a statement. "We do not tolerate
    this kind of behavior by anyone at any level in any Halliburton company."

    Critics have cited Halliburton's contracts as evidence of the Bush administration's favoritism
    toward its corporate friends. White House and Pentagon officials say the Defense Department's
    contract decisions are not affected by political concerns.

    The kickback allegations involve KBR's contract to supply U.S. Army troops in Iraq, not its separate
    contract to rebuild Iraqi oil facilities and deliver gasoline to civilians. Pentagon auditors are
    seeking a criminal investigation into findings that KBR and a Kuwaiti firm, Altanmia Marketing
    Company, overcharged by $61 million for fuel deliveries.

    Halliburton, which Vice President Dick Cheney used to run, has denied overcharging on that contract.

    The Pentagon's inspector general's office, which is investigating both allegations, declined to
    comment Friday.

    Halliburton disclosed last year that another KBR employee had paid more than $2 million in bribes to
    a Nigerian official to get favorable tax treatment. A French judge investigating a KBR joint venture
    in Nigeria with a French company has reportedly warned that Cheney, who headed Halliburton from 1995
    until 2000, could be subject to criminal charges in France. Cheney has denied any wrongdoing.

    On Friday, Democrats renewed their criticism of Halliburton and their demands for further
    investigations into the company's contracts.

    "All of Halliburton's contracts with the government need to be terminated," said Senator Frank
    Lautenberg, Democrat of New Jersey. "This is a fatal blow to the company's credibility and the
    administration's ability to defend these contracts."

    "This demands, this begs for an investigation, and this Congress has an obligation to do it,"
    Senator Byron Dorgan, Democrat of North Dakota, said on the Senate floor. "Let's suspend these
    contracts right now."

    Last week, Halliburton, Parsons and Worley Group won $2 billion in U.S. government contracts to
    replace a no-bid contract in Iraq won by Halliburton's Kellogg Brown Root unit.

    (AP, Bloomberg)
     
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  2. Anthony

    Anthony Guest

    "Polybus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]ing.google.com...
    > Halliburton staff sacked 'for taking bribes'
    >
    <nip of *huge* irrelevant post>

    Really have to wonder about posts like these. Sent to a bunch of newsgroups, to many of which it was
    quite irrelevant. And why send it anyway? Presumably anyone interested in this stuff already gets it
    from newspapers or whatever. Weird.
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, Polybus
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Halliburton staff sacked 'for taking bribes'
    >
    > Halliburton, the oil services company formerly run by the US vice-president, Dick Cheney, was
    > yesterday embroiled in new accusations of corruption after it sacked two workers over allegations
    > that they took kickbacks for awarding sub-contracts in Iraq. The company disclosed that
    > investigations were going on into whether two of its staff took up to $6m (£3.3m) from a Kuwaiti-
    > based company providing support for US troops.
    >

    The company detected the irregularity with their own internal controls, reported it promptly to the
    government, fired the employees involved, and volunteered to repay the overcharge.

    Your problem with that is...?
     
  4. Me

    Me Guest

    In article <240120041230047932%[email protected]>,
    "John‰] 
                                                                   "
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > The company detected the irregularity with their own internal controls, reported it promptly to
    > the government, fired the employees involved, and volunteered to repay the overcharge.
    >
    > Your problem with that is...?

    Halliburton is under deep scrutiny from the public and the news media as a result of the sweetheart
    deal the company got for the work in Iraq. Of course it is going to be very sensitive to such
    activities. If Halliburton hadn't received all the bad publicity about its no-bid contract in Iraq,
    I seriously doubt this problem would have been addressed.
     
  5. "John?] "
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:240120041230047932%[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Polybus
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Halliburton staff sacked 'for taking bribes'
    > >
    > > Halliburton, the oil services company formerly run by the US vice-president, Dick Cheney, was
    > > yesterday embroiled in new accusations of corruption after it sacked two workers over
    > > allegations that they took kickbacks for awarding sub-contracts in Iraq. The company disclosed
    > > that investigations were going on into whether two of its staff took up to $6m (£3.3m) from a
    > > Kuwaiti-based company providing support for US troops.
    > >
    >
    > The company detected the irregularity with their own internal controls, reported it promptly to
    > the government, fired the employees involved, and volunteered to repay the overcharge.
    >
    > Your problem with that is...?

    Schlumberger is the only other choice on Earth.

    He wants the French to get the work.
     
  6. "Me" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <240120041230047932%[email protected]>, "John?] "
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > The company detected the irregularity with their own internal controls, reported it promptly to
    > > the government, fired the employees involved, and volunteered to repay the overcharge.
    > >
    > > Your problem with that is...?
    >
    > Halliburton is under deep scrutiny from the public and the news media as a result of the
    > sweetheart deal the company got for the work in Iraq.

    As opposed to letting the work to Schlumberger; get a clue.
     
  7. Steve Hix

    Steve Hix Guest

    In article <240120041230047932%[email protected]>,
    "John‰] 
                                                                   "
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, Polybus
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Halliburton staff sacked 'for taking bribes'
    > >
    > > Halliburton, the oil services company formerly run by the US vice-president, Dick Cheney, was
    > > yesterday embroiled in new accusations of corruption after it sacked two workers over
    > > allegations that they took kickbacks for awarding sub-contracts in Iraq. The company disclosed
    > > that investigations were going on into whether two of its staff took up to $6m (£3.3m) from a
    > > Kuwaiti-based company providing support for US troops.
    > >
    >
    > The company detected the irregularity with their own internal controls, reported it promptly to
    > the government, fired the employees involved, and volunteered to repay the overcharge.
    >
    > Your problem with that is...?

    They didn't fix the problem before it happened.
     
  8. stan

    stan Guest

    In rec.food.cooking Tarver Engineering <[email protected]> wrote:

    > As opposed to letting the work to Schlumberger; get a clue.

    The Iraqi people managed their oil refineries quite well before Halliburton arrived on the scene.
    There are also other companies that could do the same work such as Bechtel and probably some foreign
    companies as well.

    A no-bid contract with a company who's former head just happens to be one of the most powerful men
    in Washington and who is still on the payroll doesn't bother you at all? If so, I have a bridge in
    New York City to sell you.
     
  9. <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In rec.food.cooking Tarver Engineering <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > As opposed to letting the work to Schlumberger; get a clue.
    >
    > The Iraqi people managed their oil refineries quite well before Halliburton arrived on the scene.

    Total managed the Iraqi's oil before the US got there and the aquifer shows the French abused
    the fields.

    > There are also other companies that could do the same work such as Bechtel and probably some
    > foreign companies as well.

    Bectel is already in Iraq, repairing the electric inferstructure.

    Bectel is not an oil field service company.

    > A no-bid contract with a company who's former head just happens to be one of the most powerful men
    > in Washington and who is still on the payroll doesn't bother you at all?

    Better Halliburton than Schlumberger.

    Didn't you undrerstand what $10 oil has done to oilfield service companies?

    > If so, I have a bridge in New York City to sell you.

    You have a buttload of ignorance that only the stupid are buying.
     
  10. Tarver Engineering <[email protected]> writes
    >> The Iraqi people managed their oil refineries quite well before Halliburton arrived on the scene.
    >
    >Total managed the Iraqi's oil before the US got there and the aquifer shows the French abused
    >the fields.

    Interesting. Can you elaborate on this?

    >> There are also other companies that could do the same work such as Bechtel and probably some
    >> foreign companies as well.
    >
    >Bectel is already in Iraq, repairing the electric inferstructure.

    You should put "repairing" in inverted commas.

    >> A no-bid contract with a company who's former head just happens to be one of the most powerful
    >> men in Washington and who is still on the payroll doesn't bother you at all?
    >
    >Better Halliburton than Schlumberger.

    Why do you think Halliburton are any better than Schlumberger?

    --
    Simon Elliott http://www.ctsn.co.uk/
     
  11. "Simon Elliott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Tarver Engineering <[email protected]> writes
    > >> The Iraqi people managed their oil refineries quite well before Halliburton arrived on the
    > >> scene.
    > >
    > >Total managed the Iraqi's oil before the US got there and the aquifer
    shows
    > >the French abused the fields.
    >
    > Interesting. Can you elaborate on this?

    The story was in the newsgroups a couple of weeks ago.

    > >> There are also other companies that could do the same work such as Bechtel and probably some
    > >> foreign companies as well.
    > >
    > >Bectel is already in Iraq, repairing the electric inferstructure.
    >
    > You should put "repairing" in inverted commas.

    Bechtel built the Iraqi electrical system in the first place.

    > >> A no-bid contract with a company who's former head just happens to be one of the most powerful
    > >> men in Washington and who is still on the payroll doesn't bother you at all?
    > >
    > >Better Halliburton than Schlumberger.
    >
    > Why do you think Halliburton are any better than Schlumberger?

    Schlumberger are French.
     
  12. Tarver Engineering <[email protected]> writes
    >> >Total managed the Iraqi's oil before the US got there and the aquifer
    >shows
    >> >the French abused the fields.
    >>
    >> Interesting. Can you elaborate on this?
    >
    >The story was in the newsgroups a couple of weeks ago.

    A quick google search doesn't find anything. Can you give me some pointers?

    BTW, not all the oilfield services companies in Iraq were French. I worked for an exploration
    company which was wholly owned by Raytheon, which had some major contracts in Iraq in the 1980s.

    >> >> There are also other companies that could do the same work such as Bechtel and probably some
    >> >> foreign companies as well.
    >> >
    >> >Bectel is already in Iraq, repairing the electric inferstructure.
    >>
    >> You should put "repairing" in inverted commas.
    >
    >Bechtel built the Iraqi electrical system in the first place.

    And have made a slow business of getting it back up and running.

    >> >> A no-bid contract with a company who's former head just happens to be one of the most powerful
    >> >> men in Washington and who is still on the payroll doesn't bother you at all?
    >> >
    >> >Better Halliburton than Schlumberger.
    >>
    >> Why do you think Halliburton are any better than Schlumberger?
    >
    >Schlumberger are French.

    a) Schlumberger isn't French.

    b) Even if they were, so what?
    --
    Simon Elliott http://www.ctsn.co.uk/
     
  13. "Simon Elliott" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Tarver Engineering <[email protected]> writes
    > >> >Total managed the Iraqi's oil before the US got there and the aquifer
    > >shows
    > >> >the French abused the fields.
    > >>
    > >> Interesting. Can you elaborate on this?
    > >
    > >The story was in the newsgroups a couple of weeks ago.
    >
    > A quick google search doesn't find anything. Can you give me some pointers?

    I don't see the articles on google, but it was a "blame Bush" set of threads on
    alt.politics.usa.republican.

    > BTW, not all the oilfield services companies in Iraq were French. I worked for an exploration
    > company which was wholly owned by Raytheon, which had some major contracts in Iraq in the 1980s.

    20 years is a long time ago.

    Total has been the main supplier since Desert Storm.
     
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