haluzak owners, tell me what you think .



D

Douglas Cole

Guest
Looking at the Haluzak horizon or hybrid, but would like to know others experiences with
these 'bents.

It would be my first USS 'bent, and SWB (well they look like an SWB/MWB) and wonder how folks have
liked theirs or not.

The seat doesn't look as adjustable as my Burley Taiko, but maybe I just don't see it .

I am 6'2" so hopefully it would fit me.

Snow is mostly gone now and no ice, maybe I go riding soon :^)

tia for any input

peace

Doug Spokane,WA
 
S

Stratrider

Guest
Doug, I do not own a Haluzak but I have ridden the Horizon a number of times including at Haluzak's
shop in Santa Rosa. If you are locked into USS, I think the Horizon is an outstanding bike. It's
well made, nicely finished, and competitively priced. Haluzak uses a linkage mechanism (like Ryan
Vanguard) to connect the handlebars to the front wheel. I like that set up much better than Vision's
direct connect. I do have issues with the sling seat. I think you are right. It is not as adjustable
as your Burley. That's something that you will have to wrestle with. If you are not locked into USS,
take a look at the high racers before you buy. I bought a Bacchetta Strada in the Spring. At 6'2",
you'll have no problem with the seat height. With pricing that is close to the Horizon I think it's
worth a look.

Jim Reilly Reading, PA RANS Stratus & Bacchetta Strada
 
T

Tracy

Guest
The handling, balance, manuverability, stability, steering, braking and fun factor are first rate.
The underseat steering is perfectly egronomic, the brakes and bar end shifters are wonderfully
placed. The unobstructed view and stable ride give you a fighter pilot feeling that does not go away
after owning one for a couple of years.

The seat angle is adjustable. You will be able to find the perfect angle after a little time getting
used to the bike. The seat bottom is not comfortable, I supplement it with a pad. The seat is the
weakest link of the bike, but overall the seat is not that bad.

I recommend knee-savers. They not only helped my knees, they help prevent your heel from hitting the
wheel. They also make clicking out easier.

Buy the fenders with the bike, unless you enjoy getting tad pole slime flung on the back of your
neck everytime you have to ride through a puddle. (I live in Houston, the water stays on the trail
where I ride for long periods of time in certain places.)

Douglas Cole wrote:

>Looking at the Haluzak horizon or hybrid, but would like to know others experiences with
>these 'bents.
>
>It would be my first USS 'bent, and SWB (well they look like an SWB/MWB) and wonder how folks have
>liked theirs or not.
>
>The seat doesn't look as adjustable as my Burley Taiko, but maybe I just don't see it .
>
>I am 6'2" so hopefully it would fit me.
>
>
>Snow is mostly gone now and no ice, maybe I go riding soon :^)
>
>tia for any input
>
>peace
>
>Doug Spokane,WA
>
 
C

Chris Crawford

Guest
Douglas - talk to Kelvin at Angletec (or Greg at Haluzak) regarding the new modified Horizon that
Kelvin and I came up with. I think they've had some success with it. It's a stiffer bike with the
weight further back. A pretty good bike if you don't want to get into the low-racer high BB variety.

Regards Chris Crawford

Douglas Cole wrote:
> Looking at the Haluzak horizon or hybrid, but would like to know others experiences with
> these 'bents.
>
> It would be my first USS 'bent, and SWB (well they look like an SWB/MWB) and wonder how folks have
> liked theirs or not.
>
> The seat doesn't look as adjustable as my Burley Taiko, but maybe I just don't see it .
>
> I am 6'2" so hopefully it would fit me.
>
>
> Snow is mostly gone now and no ice, maybe I go riding soon :^)
>
> tia for any input
>
> peace
>
> Doug Spokane,WA
 
C

<Chas>

Guest
"Douglas Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:p[email protected]...
> Looking at the Haluzak horizon or hybrid, but would like to know others experiences with
> these 'bents.
>
> It would be my first USS 'bent, and SWB (well they look like an SWB/MWB) and wonder how folks have
> liked theirs or not.
>
> The seat doesn't look as adjustable as my Burley Taiko, but maybe I just don't see it .
>
> I am 6'2" so hopefully it would fit me.
>
>
> Snow is mostly gone now and no ice, maybe I go riding soon :^)
>
> tia for any input
>
> peace
>
> Doug Spokane,WA

I've ridden my Hybrid Race for almost 5,000 miles in three years (yeah I know it's no record but
it's wonderful for me). I commuted 2 or 3 days a week from April to Augustthis year, 22 miles each
way in heavy Silicon Valley traffic. I've ridden a couple of centuries, and many 50-60 mile
recreational rides.

Pros: The Haluzak bikes are extremely well made. The USS is very ergonomic, with the bar ends and
shifters falling exactly where my hands are in a fully relaxed position. The Hybrid Race I purchased
is built of 0.043 tubing rather than the 0.039 that is normally spec'ed (I weighed 200+ when I
bought the bike). In that configuration, the bike weighed 31 lbs. In the 451/700 configuration, the
bottom bracket and seat height are almost exactly equal at ~23" The bike is elegant looking with
very clean lines and no extraneous parts or protrusions. The factory is very responsive to telephone
calls. The component quality is higher than what you will find on bikes of similar price (at least
this was true when I bought mine 3 years ago). The HHR is truly a SWB, with mine measuring 42". It
fits the Yakima Copperhead tray on my car rack perfectly.

Cons: In the 451/700 configuration, there is no possibility of a rear fender, so road spooge gets
all over the back of your head when you ride in the wet. The weight distribution is 60% front/40%
rear, which makes handling on loose or wet surfaces a little twitchy. The seat front rises as the
seat back reclines-when combined with the ~23" seat height, it means you had better have long legs
if you want to lay the seat back very much, or you should order the bike with the 409 front wheel.
The 451 front wheel limits the choice of tires, and further limits the availability of tires. I have
to special order every new front tire through my local bike shop - which I do out of choice rather
than order from the more plentiful suppliers on the net. The factory doesn't do email. I sent them
an email in July and haven't received a reply. I called them last week and spoke directly to Bill
Haluzak immediately.

In 2,200 miles of riding this year, I have had zero mechanical problems. I highly recommend the
bike. But I'm prejudiced, I own one. Feel free to contact me directly (you'll have to REMOVE THIS
from my address to reply) if you'd like to discuss it more.

HTH

<Chas> Back on his Haluzak Hybrid Race after 4 months of recovery from a back injury
 
M

Mark Leuck

Guest
"Tracy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> The handling, balance, manuverability, stability, steering, braking and fun factor are first rate.
> The underseat steering is perfectly egronomic, the brakes and bar end shifters are wonderfully
> placed. The unobstructed view and stable ride give you a fighter pilot feeling that does not go
> away after owning one for a couple of years.
>
> The seat angle is adjustable. You will be able to find the perfect angle after a little time
> getting used to the bike. The seat bottom is not comfortable, I supplement it with a pad. The seat
> is the weakest link of the bike, but overall the seat is not that bad.

The problem I had was if you lean back the seat at all my feet would no longer touch the ground, had
they split the seat like my Vision it wouldn't have been a big deal. (I'm 5'10")

Other than that the bike was excellent
 
G

Grant Knupfer

Guest
"Douglas Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> Looking at the Haluzak horizon or hybrid, but would like to know others experiences with
> these 'bents.
>
> It would be my first USS 'bent, and SWB (well they look like an SWB/MWB) and wonder how folks have
> liked theirs or not.
>
> The seat doesn't look as adjustable as my Burley Taiko, but maybe I just don't see it .
>
> I am 6'2" so hopefully it would fit me.
>
>
> Snow is mostly gone now and no ice, maybe I go riding soon :^)
>
> tia for any input
>
> peace
>
> Doug Spokane,WA

Hi Doug I am 6'6" and over(well over) 300lbs and ride a Horizion, Now mine is not your standard
Horizion but the people a Haluzak were more than willing to work with me. The standard frame was
just to short for me but I was able to test ride it so it can handle a pretty good size person. Mine
is not only longer but it is made from larger tubes than the standard. The bike has been great and I
am about 60lbs lighter than when I got it so it has done some good. Good luck Grant
 
B

Bruce

Guest
Doug, I had my HHR for 10,000 miles The more you ride it the better it feels. The seat will mold in
and get very comfy. cooler that most other seats. I am 6' 1'' and 175lbs. The bike rides smooth and
stable. I give it high marks on all counts. Once you dial in the adjustments to fit your needs you
will love this bike. Good luck-- BE
 
G

Gary Krause

Guest
Hi Doug, I own a Haluzak Horizon which I purchased last summer. I'm 5'7" and weigh 150 lbs. I bought
the Horizon at a new recumbent shop. I had never seen one in real life before, only in pictures. I
originally went to the shop, which is 50 miles from me, to see a Rans V2. I had a USS recumbent on
my list of recumbents that I would some day like to own. After being somewhat dissapointed with the
V2, I decided to try the Horizon. WOW! This bent is a blast to ride! It also has the passive
suspension in the rear, similar to the Burley bents. The seat isn't as adjustable as my V-rex but,
it really doesn't matter to me. I did notice some recumbent butt. Adjusting the straps on the base
of the seat which are velcro pretty much took care of that. It's just a matter of losening or
tightening them to your liking. The seat, believe it or not, is more comfortable than it looks.

I feel just as fast on the Horizon as I am on my V-Rex. It's like driving a sports car. The
components are Shimano LX with 105 cranks. It's very quiet and smooth. The new bikes are more
adjustable in the seat angle due to a different adjusting mechanism.

Bill Haluzak is also very good to deal with and is willing to go the extra mile to make sure that
his customers are happy. I can see why there is such a loyal following of Haluzak enthusiasts. They
really stand behind their products.

While at the recumbent shop, a man brought in a 96 model to have it surviced. It had thousands of
miles on it and was still going strong. He wasn't the original owner but, had the bike overhauled.
It looke like it had been through WWII when he brought it in.

You won't be dissapointed with this bent. For me, it's a keeper along with my V-Rex. This is the
fifth recumbent I have owned in the past five years and I have ridden quite a few different designs.

Gary Krause Haluzak Horizon and Rans V-Rex
 
B

Bentbiker

Guest
very nice bike, but for the money, the organicengines.com vapor uss is a better, and more
performance orientated. The new uss actionbents are hard to beat for less than 1/2 the price also.

Tracy wrote:
> The handling, balance, manuverability, stability, steering, braking and fun factor are first rate.
> The underseat steering is perfectly egronomic, the brakes and bar end shifters are wonderfully
> placed. The unobstructed view and stable ride give you a fighter pilot feeling that does not go
> away after owning one for a couple of years.
>
> The seat angle is adjustable. You will be able to find the perfect angle after a little time
> getting used to the bike. The seat bottom is not comfortable, I supplement it with a pad. The seat
> is the weakest link of the bike, but overall the seat is not that bad.
>
> I recommend knee-savers. They not only helped my knees, they help prevent your heel from hitting
> the wheel. They also make clicking out easier.
>
> Buy the fenders with the bike, unless you enjoy getting tad pole slime flung on the back of your
> neck everytime you have to ride through a puddle. (I live in Houston, the water stays on the trail
> where I ride for long periods of time in certain places.)
>
> Douglas Cole wrote:
>
>> Looking at the Haluzak horizon or hybrid, but would like to know others experiences with these
>> 'bents.
>>
>> It would be my first USS 'bent, and SWB (well they look like an SWB/MWB) and wonder how folks
>> have liked theirs or not.
>>
>> The seat doesn't look as adjustable as my Burley Taiko, but maybe I just don't see it .
>>
>> I am 6'2" so hopefully it would fit me.
>>
>>
>> Snow is mostly gone now and no ice, maybe I go riding soon :^)
>>
>> tia for any input peace
>>
>> Doug Spokane,WA
>>
>>
>
 
R

Rorschandt

Guest
I used to have a HP Velotechnik StreetMachine GT(SM or SM-GT for brevity) and currently ride (when
its not cold out) a Haluzak Hybrid Race. For comparison, I rarely bumped my foot while steering the
front wheel on the StreetMachine; happens almost everytime I ride the Haluzak. The ride quality,
handling and stabilty of the SM was remarkable, and so I am quite disappointed with both of those
lacking traits w/ the Haluzak. The SM was quite portly though, and weighed about 9 pounds more than
the Haluzak(with a rather old Answer suspension fork on the latter). The reason I switched? My neck.
The SM's seat angle is much more reclined, and the Haluzak can be bolt upright if you wish. If I get
my neck back in shape, I would trade the Haluzak on a Challenge Hurricane USS or another SM-GT.

rorschandt

bentbiker <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

> very nice bike, but for the money, the organicengines.com vapor uss is a better, and more
> performance orientated. The new uss actionbents are hard to beat for less than 1/2 the price also.
>
> Tracy wrote:
>> The handling, balance, manuverability, stability, steering, braking and fun factor are first
>> rate. The underseat steering is perfectly egronomic, the brakes and bar end shifters are
>> wonderfully placed. The unobstructed view and stable ride give you a fighter pilot feeling that
>> does not go away after owning one for a couple of years.
>>
>> The seat angle is adjustable. You will be able to find the perfect angle after a little time
>> getting used to the bike. The seat bottom is not comfortable, I supplement it with a pad. The
>> seat is the weakest link of the bike, but overall the seat is not that bad.
 
T

Tracy

Guest
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The seat is a little high, which was a little scary during the learning faze. My wife is a little
shorter, and I'm a little taller than you are and we really don't notice the height problem anymore.
If height is a problem, the lightning bikes are very Harley like in the seating position and height.

I personally could not stand the Vision handle bar position. To be fair, no attempt to determine if
it was adjustable so that my hands weren't pinned behind my shoulders was attempted as it was a
rental tandem.

I have adjusted the seat (hammock) so that it is very loose at the front, and a couple of
notches reclined.

Mark Leuck wrote:

>"Tracy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
>
>>The handling, balance, manuverability, stability, steering, braking and fun factor are first rate.
>>The underseat steering is perfectly egronomic, the brakes and bar end shifters are wonderfully
>>placed. The unobstructed view and stable ride give you a fighter pilot feeling that does not go
>>away after owning one for a couple of years.
>>
>>The seat angle is adjustable. You will be able to find the perfect angle after a little time
>>getting used to the bike. The seat bottom is not comfortable, I supplement it with a pad. The seat
>>is the weakest link of the bike, but overall the seat is not that bad.
>>
>>
>
>The problem I had was if you lean back the seat at all my feet would no longer touch the ground,
>had they split the seat like my Vision it wouldn't have been a big deal. (I'm 5'10")
>
>Other than that the bike was excellent
>
>
>
>
>

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Encoding: 7bit

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <title></title>
</head> <body> The seat is a little high, which was a little scary during the learning faze.
My wife is a little shorter, and I'm<br> a little taller than you are and we really don't
notice the height problem anymore. If height is a problem, the<br> lightning bikes are very
Harley like in the seating position and height.<br> <br> I personally could not stand the Vision
handle bar position. To be fair, no attempt to determine if it was adjustable<br> so that my
hands weren't pinned behind my shoulders was attempted as it was a rental tandem.<br> <br> I have
adjusted the seat (hammock) so that it is very loose at the front, and a couple of notches reclined.
<br> <br> <br> Mark Leuck wrote:<br> <blockquote type="cite"
cite="[email protected]_s04"> <pre wrap="">"Tracy" <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E"
href="mailto:[email protected]"><[email protected]></a> wrote in message <a class="moz-txt-link-
freetext" href="news:[email protected]">news:[email protected]</a>... </pre>
<blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">The handling, balance, manuverability, stability, steering,
braking and fun factor are first rate. The underseat steering is perfectly egronomic, the brakes and
bar end shifters are wonderfully placed. The unobstructed view and stable ride give you a fighter
pilot feeling that does not go away after owning one for a couple of years.

The seat angle is adjustable. You will be able to find the perfect angle after a little time getting
used to the bike. The seat bottom is not comfortable, I supplement it with a pad. The seat is the
weakest link of the bike, but overall the seat is not that bad. </pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!----
> The problem I had was if you lean back the seat at all my feet would no longer touch the ground,
had they split the seat like my Vision it wouldn't have been a big deal. (I'm 5'10")

Other than that the bike was excellent

</pre> </blockquote> <br> </body> </html>

--------------050507040101080209070407--
 
T

Tracy

Guest
--------------050206060701000106080806
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed
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Douglas Cole wrote:

>Thanks for the input Tracy, as I have not ridden a USS 'bent yet, I was hoping to get some input in
>this respect, I am not a very heavy 6'2" (lite 165#) so I am not sure that I will worry too much
>about the frame flexing unless of course it is that flimsy (others have mentioned this)... I just
>like the idea of not having that tiller in front of my face when riding (the only thing I don't
>like about my Taiko by the way) so that was the appeal of the USS 'zack besides the looks (I have
>seen one in a Portland shop but didn't get to test ride it, back pains at the time).
>
I weigh more than you do and don't notice any problems with weight. You extra leg lenght will make
foot to wheel problems highly unlikely unless you like to sit close to the pedals.

>hours...
>
>
>
>>I recommend knee-savers. They not only helped my knees, they help prevent your heel from hitting
>>the wheel. They also make clicking out easier.
>>
>>
>
>Could you explain what "knee-savers" are ? I am not familiar with them and so don't have a clue as
>to what they might be. I don't seem to have troubles with my heels hitting my front tire on my
>Taiko, but then again it is a longer frame bike and OSS.
>
>
Knee savers are a piece of round shafting that has been machined so that you can screw your pedals
into them and the knee savers then screw into the crank. The effect is to move your feet out farther
from the centerline of the bike. Before I got them, I was having knee pain. They solved the problem
completely, as well as making it easier to click out of my Speedplay frogs and eliminated my heel
hitting the wheel in extreem sharp, slow speed parking lot turns. I believe the knee savers work by
preventing twisting at the knee. On a wedgie your hips are free to rotate easily and keep your knees
under your hips (my only theory.) On a recumbent your hips do not rotate easily and I guess this
results in your knees somehow getting extra forces put on them.

>
>
>>Buy the fenders with the bike, unless you enjoy getting tad pole slime flung on the back of your
>>neck everytime you have to ride through a puddle. (I live in Houston, the water stays on the trail
>>where I ride for long periods of time in certain places.)
>>
>>
>
>Oh yes, the first thing I picked up were some fenders for my Taiko, we get enough rain around here
>and the trails can get muddy, but I really want to find a better fitting fender, as the ones I got
>don't fit my tires snugly enough to my liking (apex fender).
>
>And I have been through a few of your "rains" down in Houston, man! All I remember was the parking
>lot of the Hotel I was staying at turned into a lake and we couldn't get out for about 3 hours and
>it was like that every evening while we were there. I figured out really quickly why you have all
>those extra large culverts and drain sloughs all over the place :^}
>
>Thanks again for any input you can give.
>
>Doug
>
>

--------------050206060701000106080806 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-
Encoding: 7bit

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-
Type" content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1"> <title></title> </head> <body> <br> <br> Douglas Cole
wrote: <blockquote type="cite" cite="[email protected]"> <pre
wrap=""></pre> <pre wrap=""><!---->Thanks for the input Tracy, as I have not ridden a USS 'bent yet,
I was hoping to get some input in this respect, I am not a very heavy 6'2" (lite 165#) so I am not
sure that I will worry too much about the frame flexing unless of course it is that flimsy (others
have mentioned this)... I just like the idea of not having that tiller in front of my face when
riding (the only thing I don't like about my Taiko by the way) so that was the appeal of the USS
'zack besides the looks (I have seen one in a Portland shop but didn't get to test ride it, back
pains at the time).</pre> </blockquote> I weigh more than you do and don't notice any problems with
weight. You extra leg lenght will make<br> foot to wheel problems highly unlikely unless you
like to sit close to the pedals.<br> <blockquote type="cite"
cite="[email protected]"> <pre wrap=""> hours...

</pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">I recommend knee-savers. They not only helped my
knees, they help prevent your heel from hitting the wheel. They also make clicking out easier.
</pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!----> Could you explain what "knee-savers" are ? I am not
familiar with them and so don't have a clue as to what they might be. I don't seem to have
troubles with my heels hitting my front tire on my Taiko, but then again it is a longer frame bike
and OSS. </pre> </blockquote> Knee savers are a piece of round shafting that has been machined so
that you can screw your pedals<br> into them and the knee savers then screw into the crank.
The effect is to move your feet out farther from<br> the centerline of the bike.
Before I got them, I was having knee pain. They solved the problem completely,<br> as
well as making it easier to click out of my Speedplay frogs and eliminated my heel hitting the
wheel in <br> extreem sharp, slow speed parking lot turns. I believe the knee savers work by
preventing twisting at the knee.<br> On a wedgie your hips are free to rotate easily and keep your
knees under your hips (my only theory.) On a <br> recumbent your hips do not rotate easily
and I guess this results in your knees somehow getting extra forces<br> put on them.<br>
<blockquote type="cite" cite="[email protected]"> <pre wrap=""> </pre>
<blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">Buy the fenders with the bike, unless you enjoy getting tad
pole slime flung on the back of your neck everytime you have to ride through a puddle. (I live in
Houston, the water stays on the trail where I ride for long periods of time in certain places.)
</pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!----> Oh yes, the first thing I picked up were some fenders
for my Taiko, we get enough rain around here and the trails can get muddy, but I really want to
find a better fitting fender, as the ones I got don't fit my tires snugly enough to my liking
(apex fender).

And I have been through a few of your "rains" down in Houston, man! All I remember was the parking
lot of the Hotel I was staying at turned into a lake and we couldn't get out for about 3 hours and
it was like that every evening while we were there. I figured out really quickly why you have all
those extra large culverts and drain sloughs all over the place :^}

Thanks again for any input you can give.

Doug </pre> </blockquote> <br> </body> </html>

--------------050206060701000106080806--
 
M

Mark Leuck

Guest
"rorschandt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I used to have a HP Velotechnik StreetMachine GT(SM or SM-GT for brevity) and currently ride (when
> its not cold out) a Haluzak Hybrid Race.

I thought you sold the Haluzak? (or had it for sale)
 
R

Rorschandt

Guest
"Mark Leuck" <[email protected]> wrote in
news:[email protected]_s53:

>
> "rorschandt" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>> I used to have a HP Velotechnik StreetMachine GT(SM or SM-GT for brevity) and currently ride
>> (when its not cold out) a Haluzak Hybrid Race.
>
>
> I thought you sold the Haluzak? (or had it for sale)
>
>

It was for sale. I've decided to keep the Aerospoke wheels, and have fitted it with some more
conventional wheels. I'll probably sell it when I line up or build my next bike. Not quite sure what
that will be as the questions regarding my neck still exist. I may recline the trike seat a bunch
and try it for a while to see if my neck continues to be adversely affected. I've been doing some
therapy that has helped immensely. Thanks for remembering.

rorschandt

-
 
I

Ian Boag

Guest
Here's one from New Zealand even

I have a Horizon and a Linear LWB. The Linear has a padded seat which eventually numbs my bum. No
such problems - ever - with the zak. I like the zak better & will probably sell the Linear. I had to
try LWB ....

IB
 
M

Madog

Guest
I don't own a Haluzak, but I'd still like to add my 2 cents to this conversation. I ride a Longbikes
Slipstream, which I would NEVER sell. I've ridden 3 Horizons, for about 80 miles total. The first
bent I rode was a Horizon, and I'd have bought it but the shop I was dealing with told me I was too
heavy, and I was too naive to talk to Bill directly and have him build one for me. I've been in love
with the Horizon from the first time I sat on one. They're very sporty, quick to accelerate, easy
(VERY easy) to steer and comfortable to ride distance on. The seat is nice (then again, I like the
sling seat - see the Longbikes) I like the bar end shifters, the handlebar position and the
adjustability of the bike is supurb.

I love my Slipstream, it's the most comfortable long distance rider I've ever been on, but for a
swb, the Haluzak would be hard to beat. I have to say that if I were in the market for a new bike,
I'd have to rate the Haluzak as one of the top 3 bikes I'd love to own. The other two are the
Longbikes Eliminator - note, another swb/uss, and a Tour Easy or maybe a GRR. I'm happiest with uss,
but having put a few miles on a TE I've got to say that I'm VERY impressed with the ride. Still, all
in all, for my second bike (and likely my first bike for in town riding) I'd take ANY of the Haluzak
bikes in a second.

Still, I must say that my experience with recumbents is very true to what I've read time after
time in this newsgroup - you've got to find the one YOU are comfortable with. What works for me is
your trash. I know that RANS has a big following here, but to be honest, if you gave me a RANS -
ANY RANS - I'd sell it and buy a GOOD bike instead (yeah, I know, here come the flames!). But
that's my opinon.

As always, YMMV.

Mark

--
Mark Gregory Longbikes Slipstream O \ _____,%) (*)-'------------(*)

"Douglas Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:p[email protected]...
> Looking at the Haluzak horizon or hybrid, but would like to know others experiences with
> these 'bents.
>
> It would be my first USS 'bent, and SWB (well they look like an SWB/MWB) and wonder how folks have
> liked theirs or not.
>
> The seat doesn't look as adjustable as my Burley Taiko, but maybe I just don't see it .
>
> I am 6'2" so hopefully it would fit me.
>
>
> Snow is mostly gone now and no ice, maybe I go riding soon :^)
>
> tia for any input
>
> peace
>
> Doug Spokane,WA
 
D

Douglas Cole

Guest
On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 00:36:29 -0700, MaDoG wrote:

> I don't own a Haluzak, but I'd still like to add my 2 cents to this conversation. I ride a
> Longbikes Slipstream, which I would NEVER sell. I've ridden 3 Horizons, for about 80 miles total.
> The first bent I rode was a Horizon, and I'd have bought it but the shop I was dealing with told
> me I was too heavy, and I was too naive to talk to Bill directly and have him build one for me.
> I've been in love with the Horizon from the first time I sat on one. They're very sporty, quick to
> accelerate, easy (VERY easy) to steer and comfortable to ride distance on. The seat is nice (then
> again, I like the sling seat - see the Longbikes) I like the bar end shifters, the handlebar
> position and the adjustability of the bike is supurb.
>
> I love my Slipstream, it's the most comfortable long distance rider I've ever been on, but for a
> swb, the Haluzak would be hard to beat. I have to say that if I were in the market for a new bike,
> I'd have to rate the Haluzak as one of the top 3 bikes I'd love to own. The other two are the
> Longbikes Eliminator - note, another swb/uss, and a Tour Easy or maybe a GRR. I'm happiest with
> uss, but having put a few miles on a TE I've got to say that I'm VERY impressed with the ride.
> Still, all in all, for my second bike (and likely my first bike for in town riding) I'd take ANY
> of the Haluzak bikes in a second.
>
> Still, I must say that my experience with recumbents is very true to what I've read time after
> time in this newsgroup - you've got to find the one YOU are comfortable with. What works for me is
> your trash. I know that RANS has a big following here, but to be honest, if you gave me a RANS -
> ANY RANS - I'd sell it and buy a GOOD bike instead (yeah, I know, here come the flames!). But
> that's my opinon.
>
> As always, YMMV.
>
> Mark

Thanks Mark, I tend you agree with your sentiment about one persons gold is anothers garbage, it is
so true, that is why I was hoping to get enough postings of people who didn't necessarily like the
'zaks as well as those that did, because I like to digest everyones input and then make my own
decision based on the test rides.

But the test ride isn't going to tell me if the bike will survive 2 years of riding without falling
apart etc. And like I said in another posting, I am no mechanical engineer, and am not good at
really telling whether or not a bike is built "correctly", but at first glance I liked what I saw
when I first saw the Horizon, and will be giving Bill a call next spring to see what I can do and if
there are any shops closer that have one I can test ride...

As this purchase is meant to be a bike for in city short rides (twenty miles or less) I thought I
would give the SWB a try .

Snow is coming down solid, looks like another "in house" day :^(

peace

Douglas Cole Burley Taiko Spokane, WA
 
M

Madog

Guest
Douglas:

I think you're on the right track about the advice you're seeking. As I said, I'm not a Haluzak
owner, but I've never met anyone who had problems with the bike not standing up to use. The only bad
thing I've ever heard with any consistency is if you get the 20 inch front wheel (the Horizon), it's
hard for many people to get their feet on the ground at a stop.

Sorry to hear it's snowing in Spokane. I left Bellevue WA three years ago because I couldn't stand
the rain any longer (after 20 years in the area plus 6 when I was a kid). After two years of
wandering the country I ended up in Phoenix. Just to rub it in a little, my ride today was in shorts
and T shirt. It was in the mid 70s and sunshine. Thirty four nice miles this afternoon.

Sorry about the salt in the wound, I just couldn't resist!

Mark

--
Mark Gregory Longbikes Slipstream O \ _____,%) (*)-'------------(*)

"Douglas Cole" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:p[email protected]...
> On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 00:36:29 -0700, MaDoG wrote:
>
> > I don't own a Haluzak, but I'd still like to add my 2 cents to this conversation. I ride a
> > Longbikes Slipstream, which I would NEVER sell.
I've
> > ridden 3 Horizons, for about 80 miles total. The first bent I rode was a Horizon, and I'd have
> > bought it but the shop I was dealing with told me
I
> > was too heavy, and I was too naive to talk to Bill directly and have him build one for me. I've
> > been in love with the Horizon from the first time
I
> > sat on one. They're very sporty, quick to accelerate, easy (VERY easy)
to
> > steer and comfortable to ride distance on. The seat is nice (then again,
I
> > like the sling seat - see the Longbikes) I like the bar end shifters,
the
> > handlebar position and the adjustability of the bike is supurb.
> >
> > I love my Slipstream, it's the most comfortable long distance rider I've ever been on, but for a
> > swb, the Haluzak would be hard to beat. I have
to
> > say that if I were in the market for a new bike, I'd have to rate the Haluzak as one of the top
> > 3 bikes I'd love to own. The other two are the Longbikes Eliminator - note, another swb/uss, and
> > a Tour Easy or maybe a GRR. I'm happiest with uss, but having put a few miles on a TE I've got
to
> > say that I'm VERY impressed with the ride. Still, all in all, for my
second
> > bike (and likely my first bike for in town riding) I'd take ANY of the Haluzak bikes in a
> > second.
> >
> > Still, I must say that my experience with recumbents is very true to
what
> > I've read time after time in this newsgroup - you've got to find the one
YOU
> > are comfortable with. What works for me is your trash. I know that RANS
has
> > a big following here, but to be honest, if you gave me a RANS - ANY
RANS -
> > I'd sell it and buy a GOOD bike instead (yeah, I know, here come the flames!). But that's my
> > opinon.
> >
> > As always, YMMV.
> >
> > Mark
>
> Thanks Mark, I tend you agree with your sentiment about one persons gold is anothers garbage, it
> is so true, that is why I was hoping to get enough postings of people who didn't necessarily like
> the 'zaks as well as those that did, because I like to digest everyones input and then make my own
> decision based on the test rides.
>
> But the test ride isn't going to tell me if the bike will survive 2 years of riding without
> falling apart etc. And like I said in another posting, I am no mechanical engineer, and am not
> good at really telling whether or not a bike is built "correctly", but at first glance I liked
> what I saw when I first saw the Horizon, and will be giving Bill a call next spring to see what I
> can do and if there are any shops closer that have one I can test ride...
>
> As this purchase is meant to be a bike for in city short rides (twenty miles or less) I thought I
> would give the SWB a try .
>
>
> Snow is coming down solid, looks like another "in house" day :^(
>
> peace
>
> Douglas Cole Burley Taiko Spokane, WA
>
 
D

Dean Arthur

Guest
MaDoG wrote:
>
> Douglas:
>
...

> After two years of wandering the country I ended up in Phoenix. Just to rub it in a little, my
> ride today was in shorts and T shirt. It was in the mid 70s and sunshine. Thirty four nice miles
> this afternoon.
>
> Sorry about the salt in the wound, I just couldn't resist!
>
> Mark

Salt in the wound, huh? Wait until it's 100+ in the shade and you have to take salt tablets to
replace what you sweat out.

Or do you have a portable air conditioner on your 'bent?

I spent a couple of years in Phoenix and Yuma as a kid. Used to get reamed by my dad for hiking the
desert with only two canteens of water. He'd sweat like crazy just standing under the carport.
Didn't understand that an active kid lost moisture very slowly even walking in the hot sun.

Now freezing my cojones off in Wyoming where temps sometimes go to -50 in winter and 100 in summer!
Still, we have many lovely 'benting days and I take advantage of every one.