Ham

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by John Gaughan, Dec 21, 2003.

  1. John Gaughan

    John Gaughan Guest

    I have a nine pound ham, spiral sliced, bone-in, brown sugar cured, fully cooked.

    The label says to wrap it in foil and bake it in a pan for about two hours (based on its weight),
    until 120 degrees F.

    Any suggestions? After brining and baking turkey with aeromatics I wonder what I could do to a ham
    to make it even better... oh, by the way, this will be my first time baking a ham, so I am quite
    inexperienced when it comes to hams.

    The label also has a recipe for a praline glaze to be applied during the final half hour of cooking:

    1 1/2 cups brown sugar 6 Tbsp butter, melted 8 Tbsp honey 1 cup pecans, finely chopped

    Thoughts, suggestions?

    I am going to serve this with the mashed cauliflower recipe posted about a month ago, and probably
    baked potatoes with butter, sour cream, cheese, chives, and crumbled bacon. Mmmm... bacon...

    --
    John Gaughan
    http://www.johngaughan.net/
    [email protected]
     
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  2. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    John Gaughan wrote:
    > I have a nine pound ham, spiral sliced, bone-in, brown sugar cured, fully cooked.
    >
    > The label says to wrap it in foil and bake it in a pan for about two hours (based on its weight),
    > until 120 degrees F.
    >
    > Any suggestions?

    Sounds like you don't need suggestions. Why mess with a good thing?

    Jill
     
  3. "John Gaughan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have a nine pound ham, spiral sliced, bone-in, brown sugar cured, fully cooked.
    >
    > The label says to wrap it in foil and bake it in a pan for about two hours (based on its weight),
    > until 120 degrees F.
    >
    > Any suggestions? After brining and baking turkey with aeromatics

    *Aero*matics? Wow! ;-)

    >I wonder what I could do to a ham to make it even better... oh, by the way, this will be my first
    >time baking a ham, so I am quite inexperienced when it comes to hams.
    >
    > The label also has a recipe for a praline glaze to be applied during the final half hour of
    > cooking:
    >
    > 1 1/2 cups brown sugar 6 Tbsp butter, melted 8 Tbsp honey 1 cup pecans, finely chopped
    >
    > Thoughts, suggestions?
    >

    I don't know there's much you can do to improve on ham unless you're curing it yourself. As it is, I
    think the glaze you posted sounds quite nice. I think I would prefer that glaze to any of the ones
    I've had (involving pineapple juice or orange and brown sugar) and I think I'm going to use it this
    year. Thanks! I might leave some of the nuts whole, though. I like their texture better whole than
    finely chopped.

    I like ham served with cranberry sauce. Yum!

    rona

    --
    ***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the inconvenience!***
     
  4. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, John Gaughan
    <[email protected]> writes:

    >I have a nine pound ham, spiral sliced, bone-in, brown sugar cured, fully cooked.
    >
    >The label says to wrap it in foil and bake it in a pan for about two hours (based on its weight),
    >until 120 degrees F.
    >
    >Any suggestions? After brining and baking turkey with aeromatics I wonder what I could do to a ham
    >to make it even better... oh, by the way, this will be my first time baking a ham, so I am quite
    >inexperienced when it comes to hams.

    You won't be baking a ham, you'll be reheating a ham. Since it's already fully prepared by the
    purveyer there's not much you can do to make it better other than perhaps putting some effort into
    the presentation... I'd prepare and offer some interesting homemade breads and condiments; homemade
    mustards and horseradish dressings, with ryes and pumpernickles... serve with assorted cheeses.

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  5. Kent H.

    Kent H. Guest

    AS P-01 and Jill say, just heat the ham up and eat it. You shouldn't do anything other than applying
    glaze. Precooked ham only needs to be heated to about 110F. Heat it up as little as possible so it
    will dry less when you heat it up the second time, though with a spiral sliced ham you have to be
    careful not to dry it out with repetitive heating. Happy Hol..... Kent

    John Gaughan wrote:
    >
    > I have a nine pound ham, spiral sliced, bone-in, brown sugar cured, fully cooked.
    >
    > The label says to wrap it in foil and bake it in a pan for about two hours (based on its weight),
    > until 120 degrees F.
    >
    > Any suggestions? After brining and baking turkey with aeromatics I wonder what I could do to a ham
    > to make it even better... oh, by the way, this will be my first time baking a ham, so I am quite
    > inexperienced when it comes to hams.
    >
    > The label also has a recipe for a praline glaze to be applied during the final half hour of
    > cooking:
    >
    > 1 1/2 cups brown sugar 6 Tbsp butter, melted 8 Tbsp honey 1 cup pecans, finely chopped
    >
    > Thoughts, suggestions?
    >
    > I am going to serve this with the mashed cauliflower recipe posted about a month ago, and probably
    > baked potatoes with butter, sour cream, cheese, chives, and crumbled bacon. Mmmm... bacon...
    >
    > --
    > John Gaughan http://www.johngaughan.net/ [email protected]
     
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