Hand signals

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Arpit, Aug 19, 2003.

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  1. Arpit

    Arpit Guest

    I can't do hand signals. I just cant balance that well, or bring myslef to be waving my hands. I
    want to mount some indicator lights on my bike, any ideas about how to trigger them?
     
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  2. Arpit <[email protected]> wrote:
    : I can't do hand signals. I just cant balance that well, or bring myslef to be waving my hands. I
    : want to mount some indicator lights on my bike, any ideas about how to trigger them?

    I hesitate to be facetious, but it would be far easier to ride more to develop confidence and skill
    in a safe situation such as an empty car park, than it would be to fit blinkers. Remember, the only
    thing stopping you from making a hand signal is 90% fear and 10% skill.

    Try this: walk beside your bike while pushing it, hold on to the rear of the seat, let go of the
    handlebars. Notice how the bike has an inherent stability while moving.

    Hope this helps, cheerz, Lynzz
     
  3. Megan Webb

    Megan Webb Guest

    Notice what the motor vehicle drivers do and forget about using signals. Signals are 'nice' but not
    essential or necessary and in same cases down right dangerous.

    What is essential is to improve your balance, so that if you want to be 'nice' you can signal.
    Balance needs practice. So find a safe open space and start practicing. Try riding very slowly - as
    slow as you can. Try riding one handed again as slow as you can. I found that about 15 minutes at a
    time was enough - after that you get too tired.

    Megan

    Arpit <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I can't do hand signals. I just cant balance that well, or bring myslef to be waving my hands. I
    > want to mount some indicator lights on my bike, any ideas about how to trigger them?
     
  4. Jack Russell

    Jack Russell Guest

    You can buy them in the UK, triggered by pressing the thumb and one finger.

    Arpit wrote:

    >I can't do hand signals. I just cant balance that well, or bring myslef to be waving my hands. I
    >want to mount some indicator lights on my bike, any ideas about how to trigger them?
     
  5. Andre S .

    Andre S . Guest

    On Tue, 19 Aug 2003 13:31:18 GMT, Arpit <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I can't do hand signals. I just cant balance that well, or bring myslef to be waving my hands. I
    >want to mount some indicator lights on my bike, any ideas about how to trigger them?

    I'm not sure if they'd be legal, and motorists aren't in the habit of looking for them.

    AndreS.au ===> I ride therefore I am
     
  6. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "Megan Webb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > What is essential is to improve your balance, so that if you want to be 'nice' you can signal.
    > Balance needs practice. So find a safe open space and start practicing. Try riding very slowly -
    > as slow as you can. Try riding one handed again as slow as you can. I found that about 15 minutes
    > at a time was enough - after that you get too tired.

    I'll just add that, riding on grass might help remove some of the fear of falling off. It is also a
    little trickier to balance on uneven grass so may speed up your one-armed skills. hippy
     
  7. troyq

    troyq New Member

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    I remember at the bike show (exhibition building) in Melbourne a couple of years ago, there was a stall there with the exact thing you were after...

    It was basically a standard, bright green vest that had orange blinkers attached on each shoulder and the buttons were mounted on the handle bars (i think). At the time I remember thinking it was just another wacky invention though, and I have yet to see anyone ever wear one... I wonder if they're still around?

    Ah, hand signals for me though.
     
  8. "Andre S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 19 Aug 2003 13:31:18 GMT, Arpit <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >
    > >I can't do hand signals. I just cant balance that well, or bring myslef to be waving my hands. I
    > >want to mount some indicator lights on my bike, any ideas about how to trigger them?
    >
    > I'm not sure if they'd be legal, and motorists aren't in the habit of
    looking for them.
    >
    > AndreS.au ===> I ride therefore I am

    Have to agree with this, I think most drivers wont beware of the indicators. Try changing to longer
    handlebars, you will have more control of your bike compared to narrow bars.

    Dave
     
  9. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

  10. "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Try changing to longer handlebars, you will have more control of your
    > bike
    > > compared to narrow bars.
    >
    > But any wobbles he/she has will be magnified unless they are holding near the stem.
    >
    > hip
    >

    In fact it is the opposite, you have to move you hands much further to get the wheel to turn, a
    narrow bar is more 'twitchy'. With a longer bar you also have more leverage, so if you hit
    something, it is easier to keep the wheel going the direction yo want it to, this is why wider bars
    are favoured on DH bikes.

    Dave
     
  11. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In fact it is the opposite, you have to move you hands much further to
    get
    > the wheel to turn, a narrow bar is more 'twitchy'.

    But isn't it easier to move the bars, albiet not as far? I'm just recalling what I felt after
    swapping bars on a few bikes.. like going from 22" to 27" bars! It might've had more to do with the
    frame and fork than the bars though so you are probably right. I feel way more stable though on a
    road bike than I do a mtb. Hmm?

    hip
     
  12. "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > In fact it is the opposite, you have to move you hands much further to
    > get
    > > the wheel to turn, a narrow bar is more 'twitchy'.
    >
    > But isn't it easier to move the bars, albiet not as far? I'm just recalling what I felt after
    > swapping bars on a few bikes.. like going from 22" to 27" bars! It might've had more to do with
    > the frame and fork than the bars though so you are probably right. I feel way more stable though
    > on a road bike than I do a mtb. Hmm?
    >
    > hip

    This is just from personal experience, but I find it is easier to control larger movements of the
    body compared to smaller detailed movements. This is especially true when cold or tired (easier to
    control raising your arm than to pick up a key and open a door- if you follow what I mean). With
    wider bars I am more confident turning tighter corners than with narrow bars, I can control to a
    finer degree, and find wide bars are more forgiving, if I turn too sharp, I have the extra leverage
    to straighten up. When I go from my dually with wide bars back to the narrow bars on the HT, it
    almost feels as if I'm on a tight-rope (again this might be because of different head angle + the
    seat on my HT is set a lot higher).

    Must be horses for courses I guess - or whatever the bike equivalent is :)

    Dave
     
  13. "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Try changing to longer handlebars, you will have more control of your
    > > bike
    > > > compared to narrow bars.
    > >
    > > But any wobbles he/she has will be magnified unless they are holding near the stem.
    > >
    > > hip
    > >
    >
    > In fact it is the opposite, you have to move you hands much further to get the wheel to turn, a
    > narrow bar is more 'twitchy'. With a longer bar you also have more leverage, so if you hit
    > something, it is easier to keep the wheel going the direction yo want it to, this is why wider
    > bars are favoured on DH bikes.

    Rubbish - get someone to ride rollers for the firts time and see what's easier, gripping wide or
    close - it's far easier to stay upright holding close to the stem. We are talking trying to ride in
    a straight line here.... Gemma
     
  14. John Staines

    John Staines Guest

    I agree with Ms Gemma. Having just got a set of rollers myself :eek:)

    Gemma Kernich wrote:
    >
    > "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > Try changing to longer handlebars, you will have more control of your
    > > > bike
    > > > > compared to narrow bars.
    > > >
    > > > But any wobbles he/she has will be magnified unless they are holding near the stem.
    > > >
    > > > hip
    > > >
    > >
    > > In fact it is the opposite, you have to move you hands much further to get the wheel to turn, a
    > > narrow bar is more 'twitchy'. With a longer bar you also have more leverage, so if you hit
    > > something, it is easier to keep the wheel going the direction yo want it to, this is why wider
    > > bars are favoured on DH bikes.
    >
    > Rubbish - get someone to ride rollers for the firts time and see what's easier, gripping wide or
    > close - it's far easier to stay upright holding close to the stem. We are talking trying to ride
    > in a straight line here.... Gemma
     
  15. Andrew Swan

    Andrew Swan Guest

    Arpit wrote:
    > I can't do hand signals. I just cant balance that well, or bring myslef to be waving my hands. I
    > want to mount some indicator lights on my bike, any ideas about how to trigger them?

    I know you asked about indicating when turning, not when stopping, but did you know the Aust Road
    Rules exempt cyclists from making stop signals:

    http://www.rta.nsw.gov.au/rulesregulations/downloads/p5.pdf

    This link is to the NSW RTA web site, but the rules are Aus-wide.

    By the way, in response to the debate about whether narrower or wider bars are more stable, when
    riding with one hand (e.g. when signalling, which is what you asked about) you're definitely more
    stable with your hand as close to the stem as possible. With your hand out wide, the extra leverage
    tends to magnify any inadvertent steering movements, whereas near the stem, this isn't a problem.
    Try it for yourself and see which feels more comfortable. In reality, many of the times that you
    need to signal a turn, you also need to brake, so you don't get much choice of where your
    non-signalling hand goes, unless of course you have those old-style "panic bars" that you sometimes
    saw on road bikes.

    HTH,

    &roo
     
  16. Andre S .

    Andre S . Guest

    On Wed, 20 Aug 2003 19:06:56 +1000, Andrew Swan <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I know you asked about indicating when turning, not when stopping, but did you know the Aust Road
    >Rules exempt cyclists from making stop signals:
    >
    > http://www.rta.nsw.gov.au/rulesregulations/downloads/p5.pdf
    >
    >This link is to the NSW RTA web site, but the rules are Aus-wide.

    more so, vehicles without indicators are not required to signal for roundabouts and when turning
    left. and cyclists are specifically exempted when stopping. ie you only have to signal when turning
    right - unless you get indicators!

    AndreS.au ===> I ride therefore I am
     
  17. You can do all of those things but honestly, if you are going to ride on the road, you have to feel
    conident enough to be able to take one hand off the handlebars. If not, then you should probably
    practice on a bike track for a little while.

    "John Staines" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I agree with Ms Gemma. Having just got a set of rollers myself :eek:)
    >
    > Gemma Kernich wrote:
    > >
    > > "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > > Try changing to longer handlebars, you will have more control of
    your
    > > > > bike
    > > > > > compared to narrow bars.
    > > > >
    > > > > But any wobbles he/she has will be magnified unless they are holding near the stem.
    > > > >
    > > > > hip
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > In fact it is the opposite, you have to move you hands much further to
    get
    > > > the wheel to turn, a narrow bar is more 'twitchy'. With a longer bar you also have more
    > > > leverage, so if you hit
    something, it
    > > > is easier to keep the wheel going the direction yo want it to, this is
    why
    > > > wider bars are favoured on DH bikes.
    > >
    > > Rubbish - get someone to ride rollers for the firts time and see what's easier, gripping wide or
    > > close - it's far easier to stay upright holding close to the stem. We are talking trying to ride
    > > in a straight line here.... Gemma
     
  18. Andrew Swan

    Andrew Swan Guest

    Andre S. wrote:
    > vehicles without indicators are not required to signal for roundabouts and when turning left. and
    > cyclists are specifically exempted when stopping. ie you only have to signal when turning right -
    > unless you get indicators!
    >
    > AndreS.au ===> I ride therefore I am

    And that's why the back brake is on the left of the handlebars and the front brake is on the right -
    because it's deemed safe to use the back brake by itself but not the front brake. But I suspect
    everyone here knew that was the thinking already (now agreeing with it is a different thing
    altogether)... :)

    &roo
     
  19. > > In fact it is the opposite, you have to move you hands much further to
    get
    > > the wheel to turn, a narrow bar is more 'twitchy'. With a longer bar you also have more
    > > leverage, so if you hit something,
    it
    > > is easier to keep the wheel going the direction yo want it to, this is
    why
    > > wider bars are favoured on DH bikes.
    >
    > Rubbish - get someone to ride rollers for the firts time and see what's easier, gripping wide or
    > close - it's far easier to stay upright holding close to the stem. We are talking trying to ride
    > in a straight line here.... Gemma

    But if you are using hand signals, you are usually going to turn. I've never used rollers, but I
    imagine they are like riding on a perfectly smoth surface going in a straight line.

    Dave
     
  20. Gags

    Gags Guest

    Here's a thought for the budding handypeople amongst us........

    Hows about a system attached to a backpack that is activated via a switch on each hand and uses a
    couple of servos to raise an "arm" made out of plywood or similar to the appropriate side??

    The arms (one each side) could be painted in suitable reflective paint and you could even connect up
    some orange LEDs for better visibility at night.

    Could even make it so that if you press both buttons, both arms come out and red LEDs come on (act
    as wind brakes as well as indicating a stop ;) ).

    Could also have a "third arm" with middle digit raised to allow for appropriate and safe (both hands
    still on bars) signalling to inconsiderate motorists.

    I coulda stumbled onto a gold mine here..........ehehehhehe

    Gags "What's the point of having an electrical engineering degree if you don't come up with
    hair-brained schemes once in a while?"

    "Andrew Swan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:2A%[email protected]...
    > Andre S. wrote:
    > > vehicles without indicators are not required to signal for roundabouts
    and when turning left.
    > > and cyclists are specifically exempted when stopping. ie you only have to signal when turning
    > > right - unless you get
    indicators!
    > >
    > > AndreS.au ===> I ride therefore I am
    >
    > And that's why the back brake is on the left of the handlebars and the front brake is on the right
    > - because it's deemed safe to use the back brake by itself but not the front brake. But I suspect
    > everyone here knew that was the thinking already (now agreeing with it is a different thing
    > altogether)... :)
    >
    > &roo
     
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