Handlebar Advice



coolrunnin

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Nov 1, 2007
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I've been riding a road bike for a couple of years nowand could use some advice. When I ride, after just a few miles my thumb and the valley of my palm really start to ache. I, of course, wear gloves, but to no avail. What do you think about flat top handlebars to relieve the pressure? Can anyone recommend a good one? Thanks, Cool.
 

rwinthenorth

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Aug 27, 2006
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coolrunnin said:
I've been riding a road bike for a couple of years nowand could use some advice. When I ride, after just a few miles my thumb and the valley of my palm really start to ache. I, of course, wear gloves, but to no avail. What do you think about flat top handlebars to relieve the pressure? Can anyone recommend a good one? Thanks, Cool.
Could be lots of things, but flat handle bars won't help much IMO. They actually have fewer places to put your hands on long rides so the get numb quicker with fewer reliefs.

It sounds like fit. I had this problem when I started. To much weight on the bars. Try tilting your saddle back just enough so your not sliding forward. You can also try slightly bending your arms to relieve pressure and weight. Finally, for me I changed glove manufacturers. They all put padding in different places that can put pressure where you're not comfortable having it. I use Pearl Izumi Gel lites. They don't put padding on that nerve that's bothering you. My 2¢.:)
 

artemidorus

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Mar 10, 2004
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Consider moving your seat rearwards, shortening your stem, or even getting a frame with a shorter top tube. You can also experiment with the tilt of the handlebar and the position of the shifters on the handlebar. In general, you need to try to find a position that has your rear end further back and your torso more erect, to put more weight on your bum and feet.
A flat handlebar might solve your problem, as it will move your torso up and back, but as another poster has mentioned, it will give you fewer alternative positions.
 

PeterF

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Sep 13, 2004
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coolrunnin said:
I've been riding a road bike for a couple of years nowand could use some advice. When I ride, after just a few miles my thumb and the valley of my palm really start to ache. I, of course, wear gloves, but to no avail. What do you think about flat top handlebars to relieve the pressure? Can anyone recommend a good one? Thanks, Cool.
Assuming your overall position on the bike is good, then a couple things I would consider. experiment with hood position and tilt as recommended. I find that the best position for my Campy hoods is fairly high so the bends of the bar form a nice straight line with the hood tops. This gives my a nice platform to do most of my riding from. Also, if the tilt is right, I feel like my hands can just rest on the hoods. A couple degrees to far forward and my hands get tired quickly. I still get some numbness over time if I don't move my hands around every few miles. I try do spend time in the drops as well as the tops. Handlebars are such a personal choice that it's hard to really recommend anything, but I use alloy 3TTT Less XL and 3TTT Zepp XL's. I just like the shape of the bends and the reach/drop works for me. For bar wrap, I use Deda Nastro tape. Good grip, tough and spongy enough without feeling mushy.
 

PeterF

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Sep 13, 2004
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rwinthenorth said:
Could be lots of things, but flat handle bars won't help much IMO. They actually have fewer places to put your hands on long rides so the get numb quicker with fewer reliefs.

It sounds like fit. I had this problem when I started. To much weight on the bars. Try tilting your saddle back just enough so your not sliding forward. You can also try slightly bending your arms to relieve pressure and weight. Finally, for me I changed glove manufacturers. They all put padding in different places that can put pressure where you're not comfortable having it. I use Pearl Izumi Gel lites. They don't put padding on that nerve that's bothering you. My 2¢.:)
Ditto on PI Gel Lites. Nice padding, good price and well made.
 

coolrunnin

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Nov 1, 2007
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Folks, thanks for the advice, I really appreciate it and the nerve in my hands will appreciate it too. I probably should mention that I am 6'7" (200 centimeters) and as a result there is a lot of weight that those hands have to hold up. My bike is a Trek T1000, 63cm, and I have the handlebars turned up just a touch for a slightly easier reach. I think my seat posiiton is good, and if I went back any further, it would just mean more weight on my hands, not less. Perhaps a shorter stem makes sense. I'll talk to my mechanic about that and I will definitely try the gloves as well. Kind Regards, Cool.
 

coolrunnin

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Nov 1, 2007
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coolrunnin said:
Folks, thanks for the advice, I really appreciate it and the nerve in my hands will appreciate it too. I probably should mention that I am 6'7" (200 centimeters) and as a result there is a lot of weight that those hands have to hold up. My bike is a Trek T1000, 63cm, and I have the handlebars turned up just a touch for a slightly easier reach. I think my seat posiiton is good, and if I went back any further, it would just mean more weight on my hands, not less. Perhaps a shorter stem makes sense. I'll talk to my mechanic about that and I will definitely try the gloves as well. Kind Regards, Cool.
Any tall riders out there have this problem as well?
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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coolrunnin said:
Any tall riders out there have this problem as well?

Nope, and the skeletal history of my upper body extremeties is quite discontinuous. Making sure that your saddle is in the right spot with respect to the BB is essential. With the saddle too far forward, you will weight your hands too much.
 

artemidorus

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Mar 10, 2004
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coolrunnin said:
I think my seat posiiton is good, and if I went back any further, it would just mean more weight on my hands, not less.
Not true. If your weight goes back, your centre of gravity moves further over the pedals and seat, even if it bends you over more.