handlebar and shifter recommendation for Tandem mtb?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by tsw, Mar 3, 2004.

  1. tsw

    tsw New Member

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    I have a Cannondale MTB tandem. I'm liking it quite a bit, but noticed the otherday my wrists were bothering me. Strange, as on a ride on my MTB, straight bars don't seem to bother me.

    Also the Rapidfire or STI shifter is a pain to adjust.

    My solution- a Nitto Albatross with bar end shifters. And possibly longer stem.

    Any thoughts on good handlebar solutions for tandems- is it any different from singles?

    TIA,
    ts
     
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  2. B.C. Cletta

    B.C. Cletta Guest

    tsw <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have a Cannondale MTB tandem. I'm liking it quite a bit, but noticed the otherday my wrists were
    > bothering me. Strange, as on a ride on my MTB, straight bars don't seem to bother me.
    >
    > Also the Rapidfire or STI shifter is a pain to adjust.
    >
    > My solution- a Nitto Albatross with bar end shifters. And possibly longer stem.
    >
    > Any thoughts on good handlebar solutions for tandems- is it any different from singles?

    my HBs are about an inch closer on the long bike. i figure i need the extra muscle thru having
    them closer to me. as such the angle at which i hold the grips is slightly different. FWIW, i use
    7s top mount shifters and a SoftRide stem.
     
  3. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    Ritchey Riser Handlebars work well.
    There is more than twice the load on you and your bars for control when tandeming. The additional weight is only part of the story; the addtional leverage is even more significant. Team tandem riding takes a lot of trust and practice.
    You can attain a lot more enjoyment and satisfaction from your efforts.
    Communications without raising defensive attitude from the stoker is the key.
    I found that one way to make the point about the leverage exerted by the stoker is to put one finger on the rear saddle while walking along side the tandem. Have the stoker hold the bars while you push down and to the side with you finger. I think they will see how little side force it takes for them to feel the leverage exerted at the rear saddle.
     
  4. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    You might also check [email protected] for more threads on this topic. " [email protected]" is an international subscription based electronic mailing list for tandem bicycle enthusiasts.
     
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